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Incoming fellows bring expertise on NKorea and Asia's higher education system

News / June 30, 2014
The Korean Studies Program at Shorenstein APARC welcomes Mike Cowin, the deputy head of mission at the British Embassy in Pyongyang as a Pantech Fellow, and Oh Yeon-Cheon, the president of Seoul National University as a Koret Fellow.
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Stanford students win global food security fellowships

News / June 30, 2014
One Ph.D. candidate and two undergraduates from Stanford have won competitive fellowships to study global food security issues.
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财新专栏10: 为什么辍学?

Commentary / June 30, 2014

中国农村每年有上百万初中生辍学,辍学原因已经清晰,难在如何改善

 

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财新专栏10: 为什么辍学?

Commentary / June 30, 2014

中国农村每年有上百万初中生辍学,辍学原因已经清晰,难在如何改善

 

    教育, 尤其是中学阶段的教育,被认为是促进一个国家经济发展最重要的推动力之一。“二战”以来从中等收入转型到高等收入的大部分国家,经济发展恰与中学高入学率 一致。但中国则不然。尤其在农村,贫困地区学生完成中学教育的人数比例很低,只有不到40%学生上了高中。在城市,这个比率是90%。

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Faculty Spotlight: Phillip Lipscy

News / June 27, 2014
Phillip Lipscy, the Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow at FSI and assistant professor in the Department of Political Science, talks about his time at Stanford as a student and teacher. In conversation with Shorenstein APARC, Lipscy highlights current projects and motivations to research in the fields of East Asian political economy and international relations.
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British diplomat to Pyongyang to join Shorenstein APARC as Pantech Fellow

News / June 26, 2014
Mike Cowin, the deputy head of mission at the British Embassy in Pyongyang, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), will join the Korean Studies Program at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center as the 2014–15 Pantech Fellow.
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Why the massive black market trade in cigarettes affects you even if you don't smoke

News / June 25, 2014
A National Academy of Sciences committee meets this week to study a large, growing and little-understood black market in drugs. But rather than cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine, the committee members will be discussing tobacco cigarettes. The global black market in tobacco is estimated to supply 11.6% of the world’s consumption, a startling 650 billion cigarettes a year. And there are two components to this market that have drawn the particular scrutiny of law enforcement: fake cigarettes and tax avoidance.
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Fukushima: Japan’s political leadership helped save country from worst-case disaster, Stanford researcher says

News / June 25, 2014
Kenji Kushida, the Takahashi Research Associate in Japanese Studies at FSI’s Shorenstein APARC, argues Japan’s political leadership under Prime Minister Naoto Kan and the Democratic Party of Japan was beneficial, giving direction at a critical time, and when the government lacked capacity and systems of emergency planning.
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Shorenstein APARC fosters dialogue on Muslim experience in Asia through new book

News / June 25, 2014
Rafiq Dossani, a former senior research scholar at Shorenstein APARC, examines the paradox of Muslim minority decline in Asia within a new book, "Modes of Engagement: Muslim Minorities in Asia." He says a way forward is for governments to focus on the poorest and connect education to development, thereby incorporating this peripheral group.
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Korean university president selected as Koret Fellow

News / June 25, 2014
Oh Yeon-Cheon, the president of Seoul National University (SNU), has been named the 2014–15 Koret Fellow. He will join the Korean Studies Program at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center this fall after completing his four-year term as SNU’s president.
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Journal Article: "Legislative Activity and Gridlock in the European Union," written by Christophe Crombez and Simon Hix

News / June 24, 2014
The latest publication by Stanford Consulting Professor Christophe Crombez and LSE Professor Simon Hix on European Union (EU) policy making.
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Journal Article: "Preferences for International Redistribution: The Divide over the Eurozone Bailouts," written by Michael Bechtel, Jens Hainmueller and Yotam Margalit

News / June 24, 2014
Research by Stanford professor Jens Hainmueller and co-writers Michael Bechtel and Yotam Margalit looks at the question of why European Union voters choose to support the financial bail out of other countries.
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Journal Article: "Technology and the Era of the Mass Army," written by Massimiliano Gaetano Onorato, Kenneth Scheve and David Stasavage

News / June 24, 2014
Written by Massimiliano Gaetano Onorato (IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca), Kenneth Scheve (Stanford University), and David Stasavage (New York University), this article investigates the influence of technology on the size of armies, using data from thirteen great powers between the years of 1600 of 2000.
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Journal Article: "A Nation of Immigrants: Assimilation and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration," written by Ran Abramitzky, Leah Platt Boustan and Katherine Eriksson

News / June 24, 2014
This article challenges previous findings on the assimilation and economic outcomes of immigrants during the Age of Mass Migration. This soon to be published research was conducted and written by Stanford professor Ran Abramitzky, UCLA professor Leah Platt Boustan and Cal Poly professor Katherine Eriksson.
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Journal Article: "German Jewish Émigrés and U.S. Invention," written by Petra Moser, Alessandra Voena, and Fabian Waldinger

News / June 24, 2014
The soon to be published journal article written by professors Petra Moser (Stanford), Alessandra Voena (University of Chicago) and Fabian Waldinger (University of Warwick) looks at the impact that Jewish émigrés from Nazi Germany had on US science.
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Ben Abdallah leaves Stanford for the UK

News / June 24, 2014
Prince Moulay Hicham Ben Abdallah, a consulting professor at CDDRL is leaving Stanford at the end of this academic year to pursue research in Islamic studies in the United Kingdom. Ben Abdallah joined CDDRL as a visiting scholar in 2007, and then became a consulting professor. He worked with CDDRL Director Larry Diamond to launch the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy.
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Should the US Be Bullish or Bearish on China?

Commentary / June 20, 2014

CISAC Co-Director Amy Zegart writes in The American Interest that a strong and rising China, as well as a weak an unstable one, should concern the United States. But perhaps most troubling is the uncertainty about which scenario will eventually play out, and Washington’s strategic orientation toward Europe and the Middle East.

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Zegart: Should the US be bullish or bearish on China's rapid rise?

Commentary / June 20, 2014
CISAC Co-Director Amy Zegart writes in The American Interest that a strong and rising China, as well as a weak and unstable one, should concern the United States. But perhaps most troubling is the uncertainty about which scenario will eventually play out.
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White House reappoints Ewing to nuclear waste review board

News / June 20, 2014
The White House has reappointed CISAC's Rod Ewing as chairman of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, which oversees the Department of Energy activities related to the safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste.
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Burmese human rights activist on new interfaith marriage bill in Burma

News / June 20, 2014
In a piece for The Irrawaddy, Draper Hills Summer Fellow Zin Mar Aung ('13), a Burmese human rights activist, writes on recent attempts by nationalist monks in Burma to lobby for a new law, which would restrict interfaith marriages and interrupt individual freedoms. Aung critiques the so-called reformist government, calling all people of Burma, no matter gender, ethnicity or faith, to unite during Burma's democratic reform process.
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SCPKU faculty fellow speaks on innovation in mobile healthcare

News / June 19, 2014

Robert Chang, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Stanford University Medical Center and SCPKU Faculty Fellow, gave a public talk at the center earlier this month focused on mobile healthcare innovation and the growing adoption of smartphones as medical devices.

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Cyber fellow Jonathan Mayer takes the true interdisciplinary path

News / June 18, 2014
Jonathan Mayer's education path is unusuall: He has earned a Stanford law degree while working on his Ph.D. in computer science. His research on the NSA claims sensitive information about Americans can be gleaned in "metadata" gathered by the spy agency.
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Stanford Global Development and Poverty initiative awards $4.6 million for research aimed at alleviating poverty

News / June 18, 2014
Fourteen Stanford researchers addressing global poverty through a range of academic disciplines are receiving the money from the university-wide Global Development and Poverty initiative. The initiative is part of the Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Economies and is administered in partnership with Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.
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