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Hong Kong localism and independence

Commentary / August 16, 2018

Hong Kong’s democrats need to focus on ‘prize’ of universal suffrage rather than independence, leading US academic Larry Diamond says. Read the article here.

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The Freeman Foundation: Supporting the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia for 20 Years

News / August 15, 2018

I vividly remember the first time I met Houghton “Buck” Freeman (former Chairman of the Freeman Foundation) in New York City nearly 20 years ago. A short time after this meeting, he and his wife, Doreen (former Trustee of the Freeman Foundation), kindly took the time to visit me at Stanford University. I never imagined then that SPICE would have remained a grantee of the Freeman Foundation for so many years.

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Saving the world’s food and water supplies with Ertharin Cousin

Q&A / August 13, 2018

The Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University is pleased to announce that former U.S. Ambassador and World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director Ertharin Cousin will return for a second year at Stanford. We caught up with Cousin to ask about her plans for this upcoming school year.

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The Decline of American Public Administration

Commentary / August 13, 2018

"If you want some notion of the problem, just try uttering the words “public administration” before a roomful of students and watch them look at their phones or start to fall asleep. Nonetheless, the classic field of public administration is one of the most important today, and its decline (at least in the United States) is one of the reasons why we get poor service from government," writes CDDRL Director Francis Fukuyama.

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Is America Breaking up the International Order? Q&A with D. Holloway

Q&A / August 10, 2018

We caught him to hear his views on recent developments in U.S.-Russia relations one last time and to talk about his time at Stanford.

 

At the NATO summit, Trump claimed that Germany “is a captive of Russia.” Is there any foundation to this claim?

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Social Media and Censorship

Commentary / August 9, 2018

"The idea that the big internet platforms are not media companies has never really been tenable, and the contradictions in their public protestations of neutrality have become ever more apparent over time," writes Francis Fukuyama in The American Interest. Read the article here

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Asia Health Policy Program Assembles Conferences in Beijing on Healthy Aging and Primary Care

News / August 8, 2018

In the summer of 2018, the Asia Health Policy Program (AHPP) at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (co)hosted two conferences in Beijing. From June 25-26, AHPP hosted “Healthy Aging and Chronic Disease Management in China and India in International Comparison” at the Stanford Center at Peking University in Beijing.

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CVID approach to North Korea's nuclear program faces significant challenges

News / August 8, 2018

The recent development of the North Korea's summit diplomacy and feasibility of CVID (Complete, Verifiable and Irreversible Dismantlement) of the nuclear program have received unprecedented responses, both optimistic and pessimistic, from the international community.

Please stay tuned to this page for the APARC researchers' commentary and analysis on the CVID of the North Korean nuclear program through articles published in various news media.

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Teaching Public Policy, part 2

News / August 7, 2018

"In my previous post, I noted how public policy education needs to shift its focus from training policy analysts to training leaders who are capable of actually implementing good policies.

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Legal US immigrants may be scared to sign up for benefits

News / August 3, 2018

The Trump administration's immigration crackdown may be leading to an unintended consequence: a drop-off in benefits enrollment among legal Hispanic immigrants, according to new research by Stanford Health Policy's Marcella Alsan.

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Gi-Wook Shin on Korea

Commentary / August 3, 2018

Gi-Wook Shin, director of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, regularly writes on Korean affairs for Korean audience. The links to his recent articles appeared in Munwha Ilbo, a South Korean news mediaare listed below. Note: The articles are written in Korean.

The Danger of a Compromised Alliance (Gi-Wook Shin, August 1, 2018)

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Cybersecurity expert Alex Stamos joins Stanford University as fellow

News / August 1, 2018

 

Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Hoover Institution announced today the appointment of Alex Stamos as a William J. Perry Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC), Cyber Initiative fellow, and Hoover visiting scholar.

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Should we enroll kids in coding classes?

Q&A / August 1, 2018

"I do think that there is a certain digital language that will be beneficial to young people, students, in the very near future," says Yong Suk Lee, deputy director of the Korea Program, in a recent interview with head of Friedrick Nauman Foundation Global Innovation Hub.

Read the full interview here.

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Michael McFaul named the new Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Professor of International Studies

News / July 24, 2018

To recognize his exceptional contributions to political science, FSI Director Michael McFaul has been named the Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Professor of International Studies, effective June 14, 2018.

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Stanford researchers find warming temperatures could increase suicide rates across the U.S. and Mexico

News / July 23, 2018

Suicide rates are likely to rise as the earth warms, according to new research published July 23 in Nature Climate Change. The study, led by Stanford economist Marshall Burke, finds that projected temperature increases through 2050 could lead to an additional 21,000 suicides in the United States and Mexico.

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A better way to measure progress toward the UN Sustainable Development Goals

News / July 23, 2018

A new calculation that combines health and economic well-being at the population level could help to better measure progress toward the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals and illuminate major disparities in health and living standards across countries, and between men and women, according to a new study by Stanford and Harvard researchers.

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More racial diversity among physicians would lead to better health among black men, research shows

News / July 18, 2018

African-American doctors could help reduce cardiovascular mortality among black men by 19 percent — if there was more racial diversity among physicians, according to a new study led by Stanford Health Policy’s Marcella Alsan.

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Siegfried Hecker's 'Solution' to North Korean Denuclearization - Interview with SisaIN (Korea)

News / July 16, 2018

SisaIN: You suggested that the best way for denuclearization is to convert N. Korea's nuclear and missile programs for civilian use rather than total denuclearization. Is it because 'total denuclearization' or 'complete denuclearization' as agreed between Trump and Kim Jung Un is impossible to achieve under any circumstances?

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Web-Event: E. Donahoe in 'Pulling at the Strings: Kremlin's Interference in Elections'

News / July 16, 2018

Today, while the President of the United States challenged the US intelligence agencies’ conclusion on Russia’s interference in 2016 election, the Atlantic Council and the Alliance of Democracies

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Rosenkranz Prize winner hopes to develop malaria vaccine targeting pregnant women

News / July 11, 2018

Pregnant women and their unborn children are more susceptible to the adverse consequences of malaria. This year's Rosenkranz Prize winner, Prasanna Jagannathan, is investigating new strategies to lay the foundation for a vaccine to prevent malaria in pregnancy.

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Stanford scholars discuss the benefits and risks of using talking software to address mental health

News / July 10, 2018

Interacting with a machine may seem like a strange and impersonal way to seek mental health care, but advances in technology and artificial intelligence are making that type of engagement more and more a reality. Online sites such as 7 Cups of Tea and Crisis Text Line are providing counseling services via web and text, but this style of treatment has not been widely utilized by hospitals and mental health facilities.

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