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FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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Evidence suggests paid family leave yields long-term child and maternal health benefits

News / March 29, 2019

Maya Rossin-Slater lays out the evidence that suggests the introduction of paid family leave for up to one year in duration may yield significant child and maternal health benefits, both in the short and long term. 

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8th annual writing prize in Korean studies

News / March 29, 2019

The Korea Program Prize for Writing in Korean Studies recognizes and rewards outstanding examples of writing in an essay, term paper, or thesis produced during the current academic year in any discipline within the area of Korean studies, broadly defined. This competition is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. The prize will be awarded at a special ceremony in the fall, and the first place winner will receive a certificate and $1,000; Honorable mention winner(s) will receive a certificate.

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Effects of Climate Change on Suicide Rates

News / March 29, 2019

As global temperatures rise, climate change’s impacts on mental health are becoming increasingly evident. Recent research has linked elevated temperatures to an increase in violence, stress and decreased cognitive function leading to impacts such as reduced test scores, lowered worker productivity and impaired decision-making.

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Academic Prize Awarded to Korea Program Deputy Director

News / March 29, 2019

We are happy to share that FSI’s SK Center Fellow and APARC's Korea Program Deputy Director Yong Suk Lee is the recipient of the 2018 Urban Land Institute United Kingdom Academic Prize for his paper “Entrepreneurship, small business and economic growth in cities.”

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Scholars, Journalists, and Former Commander of U.S. Forces Korea Discuss North Korea’s Future

News / March 28, 2019

On the heels of the abrupt ending of the Hanoi summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, with the future of the diplomacy of denuclearization in question, the Korea Program at Shorenstein APARC convened the 11th Koret Workshop, appropriately titled this year “North Korea and the World in Flux.”

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Michael McFaul Testifies Before House Intelligence Committee

News / March 28, 2019

The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence held a public hearing on Thursday, March 28, 2019, as part of its investigation into Russian influence during and after the 2016 election campaign.

The hearing, "Putin’s Playbook: The Kremlin’s Use of Oligarchs, Money and Intelligence in 2016 and Beyond” included testimony by Michael McFaul, former U.S.

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Physicians with multiple malpractice claims are more likely to stop practicing or go solo

News / March 27, 2019

Stanford researchers find that physicians with poor malpractice liability records are no more likely than physicians who did not experience claims to relocate for a fresh start elsewhere. However, they were more likely to cease practice or to shift to smaller practice groups or to solo practice.

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VIDEO: Francis Fukuyama: This is what SA must do to recover and thrive

Commentary / March 27, 2019

Francis Fukuyama tells News24 that South Africa must ensure that its institutions are protected and remain committed to its constitution if it is to overcome the last decade and become competitive in the global economy. 

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BOOK REVIEW: A Grand Fresco: The Origins of Political Order

Commentary / March 25, 2019

Global Inequality reviews Francis Fukuyama's book, "The Origins of Political Order."

Read it here.

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AIT Director Addresses Significance of Taiwan Relations Act's 40th Anniversary

News / March 25, 2019

On March 4, Brent Christensen, Director of the American Institute in Taiwan’s Taipei office, delivered the keynote speech at the Taiwan Democracy and Security Project's annual workshop. A video recording of the event is available below for 30 days (additionally, a transcript of Mr. Christensen's prepared remarks is available on the American Institute in Taiwan website).

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MIP Feature Friday: Lisa Einstein

Q&A / March 22, 2019

"There is this sense of possibility - this sense of 'if this is your idea, just do it."

Our graduate student, Lisa Einstein, approaches her work and studies by this motto. Find out why she chose MIP as the graduate program for her on our FSI blog. #MIPFeatureFriday

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Study finds China’s population control policy before the One Child Policy was responsible for 200,000 'Missing Girls'

News / March 21, 2019

An estimated 210,000 girls may have “gone missing” due to China’s “Later, Longer, Fewer” campaign, a birth planning policy predating the One Child Policy, according to a new study led by Stanford Health Policy researchers published by the Center for Global Development. 

 

 
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Diplomacy Turned Personal for Brett McGurk and Jason Rezaian

News / March 21, 2019

Secret negotiations between the U.S. government and Iran’s intelligence services over the fate of political prisoners led to a lasting friendship.


When Secretary of State John Kerry first asked Brett McGurk to lead secret negotiations with Iran to secure the release of Jason Rezaian, Brett’s initial reaction was that he did not have the time to give the new mission the attention it deserved.

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Identity Politics – The Demand for Dignity and the Nation State’s Future

Commentary / March 20, 2019

Watch Francis Fukuyama's lecture he gave in Vienna in March, 2019 on Identity and the Nation State’s Future as part of The ERSTE Foundation Tipping Point Talks 2019. Full video here.

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Karl Eikenberry Discusses the Second Report of the Task Force on U.S.-China Policy and Its Recommendations for Managing the Increasingly Competitive U.S.-China Relationship

Commentary / March 20, 2019

Three years into the Trump administration, “the United States and the People’s Republic of China find their bilateral relationship at a dangerous crossroads,” write Orville Schell of the Asia Society and Susan Shirk of the University of California San Diego (UCSD), co-chairs of the Task Force on U.S.-China Policy, at the opening of a recently published report,

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Effects of Climate Change on Hunger

News / March 19, 2019

As the climate changes, where plants grow best is predicted to shift. Crops that once thrived as a staple in one region may no longer be plentiful enough to feed a community that formerly depended on it. Beyond where plants grow, there’s also the issue of how they grow. Evidence suggests that plants grown in the presence of high carbon dioxide levels aren’t as nutritious.

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Stanford News: Computer Science College Seniors in U.S. Outperform Peers in China, India and Russia, New Research Says

News / March 19, 2019

Writer Alex Shashkavech writes about Prashant Loyalka's new study that "found that undergraduate seniors studying computer science in the United States outperformed final-year students in China, India and Russia on a standardized exam measuring their skills. The research results were published on March 18 in a new paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences." Read the full article in Stanford News.

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Five years after Crimea’s illegal annexation, the issue is no closer to resolution

Commentary / March 18, 2019

March 18 marks the fifth anniversary of Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea, which capped the most blatant land grab in Europe since World War II. While the simmering conflict in Donbas now dominates the headlines, it is possible to see a path to resolution there. It is much more difficult with Crimea, which will remain a problem between Kyiv and Moscow, and between the West and Russia, for years—if not decades—to come.

THE TAKING OF CRIMEA

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SCPKU announces its newest fellows

News / March 15, 2019

The Stanford Center at Peking University announced its newest faculty and pre-doctoral fellows from January 2019 application round.

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Douglas K. Owens named chair of USPSTF, the body of experts behind many health-care decisions

News / March 14, 2019

Stanford Health Policy’s Douglas K. Owens was named chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Tasks Force, an independent panel of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine that makes health-care recommendations to Congress and the American public.

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