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FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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Illustrating the Health Effects of Smoking Reduction

News / December 16, 2019

Tobacco use is responsible for the death of approximately eight million people worldwide, estimates the World Health Organization, and countries are increasingly making tobacco control a priority. Indeed the relationship between smoking and the burden of chronic diseases such as cancer, lung disease, and heart disease, and, in turn, premature mortality, is well documented. Yet little is known about the health effects of smoking interventions among subgroups of smokers.

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Ratcheting up the Pressure: Assessing the Risks of Trump's Iran Policy

Q&A / December 15, 2019

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A Season of Caesars

Commentary / December 12, 2019

"Ideologically, today’s autocrats are a more motley and pragmatic crew. They generally claim to be market friendly, but mainly they are crony capitalists, who, like Putin in Russia, Orban in Hungary, and Erdogan in Turkey, are first concerned with enriching themselves, their families, and their parties and support networks.

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Taiwan Election: The Final Countdown

Blog / December 12, 2019

This post is an update to our Presidential Election 2020 Scene Setter published August 26, 2019. 

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Francis Fukuyama on Why We Should All Be Paying Attention to Ukraine

News / December 12, 2019

Of all of the countries in the world attempting a transition to democracy, Francis Fukuyama thinks that Ukraine is the most promising.

“The election of [Volodymyr] Zelensky and the new parliament is just a miracle,” Fukuyama told Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) Director Michael McFaul on the World Class podcast. “Can you imagine, a country getting rid of two-thirds of its parliament and starting over with new people, many of whom are under 35 years old?” 

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What we learned from the Afghanistan Papers

News / December 11, 2019

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Stanford Researchers Find No ‘Magnet Effect’ When States Extend Public Health Insurance to Immigrants

News / December 9, 2019

Immigrants, once settled in a particular state, will not move to another state in search of public health benefits, Stanford researchers find.

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SPICE’s Rylan Sekiguchi and Jonas Edman Share Stage with Secretary Norman Mineta

News / December 9, 2019

“Let’s bring all the planes down”—Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta’s words to ground all U.S. planes on 9/11—elicited a moment of riveted silence in the audience of educators attending the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference in Austin, Texas, as they listened to Secretary Mineta’s keynote address on November 23, 2019. Upon hearing those words, many were transported back to a time when most people probably remember exactly where and what they were doing at the time that they heard of the events unfolding on September 11, 2001.

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Life after Yucca Mountain: The time has come to reset US nuclear waste policy

Commentary / December 9, 2019

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Reduced Soil Tilling Helps Both Soils and Yields, Stanford Researchers Find

News / December 6, 2019

Agriculture degrades over 24 million acres of fertile soil every year, raising concerns about meeting the rising global demand for food. But a simple farming practice born from the 1930’s Dust Bowl could provide a solution, according to new Stanford research. The study, published Dec.

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Presidential candidates advance by being divisive. We can do better than that.

Commentary / December 6, 2019

"What if we had a better way to select presidential nominees, one that didn’t reward appeals to the most ideologically committed voters and donors in each party? What if we weren’t trying to excite the already convinced — to vote, to contribute and to volunteer on campaigns? This pulls each party toward more militant postures and deepens polarization. What if we prized substantive dialogue across the partisan divides over intense mobilization within them?

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Why care about Ukraine and the Budapest Memorandum

Commentary / December 5, 2019

Original written for Brookings.Com

 

Since 2014, when Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine, the United States has provided Ukraine with $3 billion in reform and military assistance and $3 billion in loan guarantees. U.S. troops in western Ukraine train their Ukrainian colleagues. Washington, in concert with the European Union, has taken steps to isolate Moscow politically and imposed a series of economic and visa sanctions on Russia and Russians.

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Nominations Open for 2020 Shorenstein Journalism Award

News / December 3, 2019

STANFORD, CA, December 3, 2019 — The Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), Stanford University’s hub for interdisciplinary research, education, and engagement on contemporary Asia, invites nominations for the 2020 Shorenstein Journalism Award.

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An Existential Moment for Democracy?

Commentary / December 2, 2019

“What saves citizens from the knock on the door in the dead of night, from the risk of being silenced or removed, is a constitution, a robust body of laws, an independent judiciary to enforce them, and a culture that insists on free elections, human rights, and human dignity,” says Larry Diamond for Stanford Magazine.

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Stanford e-Japan: My Window to the Wider World

Blog / December 2, 2019

The following reflection is a guest post written by Miyu Hayashi, a Spring 2016 alum and honoree of the Stanford e-Japan Program, which is currently accepting applications for Spring 2020. She is now a medical student at Mie University, Faculty of Medicine.

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Q & A: Brett McGurk, former envoy for coalition fighting ISIS under Obama, Trump

Q&A / December 2, 2019

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Stanford e-Tottori: Reflections

Blog / November 27, 2019

Stanford e-Tottori is a distance-learning course sponsored by the Tottori Prefectural Board of Education and the Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) at Stanford University. Tottori Governor Shinji Hirai and Superintendent Hitoshi Yamamoto of the Tottori Prefectural Board of Education were instrumental in its establishment. Offered for the first time in 2016, Stanford e-Tottori presents a creative and innovative approach to teaching Japanese high school students about U.S. society and culture.

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Engineering and Technology Expert Cautions Against U.S. Restrictions on Collaboration with Chinese Nationals

News / November 26, 2019

As a U.S.-China trade deal hangs in the balance and the world’s two largest economies are locked in a race for technological supremacy, concerns have arisen about China’s counterintelligence threat to the United States. In July 2019, FBI Director Christopher Wray told members of the U.S.

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Naimark's New Book Makes Financial Times Best History Books List

News / November 22, 2019

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CDC Supports Salomon's Prevention Policy Modeling Lab

News / November 22, 2019

Stanford Health Policy researchers, led by Josh Salomon, have been awarded a five-year grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to conduct health and economic modeling to guide national and local policies and programs focusing on some of the most important infectious diseases in the United States.

 
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‘Tough Love’ from Family Led Susan Rice to a Life of Public Service and the White House

News / November 21, 2019

In front of a crowd of more than 750 people, Susan Rice, national security advisor in the Obama administration, sat down with Michael McFaul to talk about her new memoir “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For.” McFaul, the director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, is also a  former member of the Obama administration, having served as the U.S. Ambassador to Russia. Together they discussed her service under President Obama, the political divisions in the U.S., and her book’s focus on family and the importance of learning from your mistakes.

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How to End the War in Ukraine

Commentary / November 21, 2019

For more than five years, Russian forces and their proxies have waged a bloody war against Ukrainian forces in the Donbas region of eastern Ukraine. The conflict has claimed more than 13,000 lives, driven almost two million people from their homes, and caused immense material damage. France and Germany have together sought to broker peace but failed to produce a durable cease-fire—let alone a political settlement....

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Post-political uncertainties: Governing nuclear controversies in post-Fukushima Japan

News / November 21, 2019

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