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FSI Newsroom

FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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Shorenstein Postdoc Spotlight: Hannah Kim

Q&A / March 12, 2020

Living and studying all over East Asia, some of Hannah Kim’s most favorite activities were to meet and talk to diverse people from different backgrounds. Those conversations sparked her interest in how public opinion and perceptions of democracy differ across societies — a question that turned into the focus of her doctoral dissertation, which she completed last year at the University of California, Irvine.

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Global Populism Is On the Rise But There Are Solutions, Say FSI Experts

News / March 12, 2020

Once associated with Latin American and post-communist democracies, populist parties and politicians have now gained support and power in established democracies.

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Populism is a political problem that is putting democracy at risk, Anna Grzymala-Busse says

News / March 11, 2020

The rise of populism – a political argument that pits ordinary people against a corrupt, government elite – is putting democracy at risk, said Stanford scholars in a new white paper released today.

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Polish Presidential Election 2020: Two Months Out

Blog / March 10, 2020

For a broader look at the upcoming Polish election, its stakes and major figures, see our scene-setter.

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Waseda University and Stanford University: From 1905 to 2020 and Beyond

Blog / March 10, 2020

With the start of baseball season, a fun fact to note is that on April 16, 1905, the Tokyo-based Waseda University baseball team played the Stanford baseball team in California. Stanford beat Waseda 9-1. This game may have been the first formal event between Stanford and Waseda.

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Is This the End of the Open Skies Treaty?

Commentary / March 7, 2020

Senior Trump administration officials reportedly will meet the week of March 9 to decide on withdrawing from the 1992 Open Skies Treaty. Doing so would constitute another mistake by an administration that increasingly seems set against arms control.

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China’s Great Firewall Is Built on Friction-based Censorship, Says Margaret Roberts

News / March 6, 2020

The Great Wall of China is one of Asia’s most photographed and visited landmarks. Built over thousands of years and winding through a total of 13,170 miles, this wide-reaching network of defenses was constructed as a barrier against China’s northern neighbors. But within the digital landscape of China is a much less conspicuous yet far more pervasive set of fortifications: the Great Firewall.

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How Taiwan Used Big Data, Transparency and a Central Command to Protect Its People from Coronavirus

News / March 3, 2020
Taiwan is only 81 miles off the coast of mainland China and was expected to be hard hit by the coronavirus, due to its proximity and the number of flights between the island nation and its massive neighbor to the west. Yet it has so far managed to prevent the coronavirus from heavily impacting its 23 million citizens, despite hundreds of thousands of them working and residing in China.
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The Education Partnership for Internationalizing Curriculum: Reflections on Collaborating with Community College Educators

Blog / March 3, 2020

A primary goal of SPICE is to support educators who wish to infuse their teaching with global perspectives. One of the most important ways in which we strive to do this is through our collaboration with Stanford Global Studies (SGS) on the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI-funded Education Partnership for Internationalizing Curriculum, also known as EPIC.

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Task Force Makes Final Recommendation to Screen All Adults for Hepatitis C

News / March 2, 2020
A task force of national health experts recommends clinicians screen all adults 18 to 79 for the hepatitis C virus (HCV), noting that the viral infection is now associated with more deaths in the United States than the top 60 reportable infectious diseases combined.
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Video: Karen Eggleston Advises Proactive Preparation for COVID-19 Spread in US

News / March 2, 2020

Deputy Director of APARC and Director of the Asia Health Policy Program Karen Eggleston recently spoke to Bloomberg Markets about the new cases and the further spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus in the United States.

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Look Beyond GDP to Measure Prosperity, Urges Amit Kapoor

News / February 27, 2020

When economists, policymakers, and media commentators discuss growth or compare living standards across countries, they typically turn to a single measure: Gross Domestic Product (GDP). In layman’s terms, GDP is the monetary value of all goods and services made or exchanged in a country during a specific period of time.

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Karen Eggleston Examines China’s Looming Demographic Crisis, in Fateful Decisions

Q&A / February 26, 2020

China has tremendous resources, both human and financial, but it may now be facing a perfect storm of challenges. Its future is neither inevitable nor immutable, and its further evolution will be highly contingent on the content and efficacy of complex policy choices.

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Task Force: Not Enough Evidence to Recommend Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Elderly

News / February 25, 2020
More evidence-based research is needed before the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force can recommend that clinicians screen their older patients for cognitive impairment such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.
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What You Need To Know About the Coronavirus

News / February 24, 2020

The coronavirus — officially known as COVID-19 — has infected more than 75,000 people and killed more than 2,000 since it was first identified in Wuhan, China, in late December. Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) experts Karen Eggleston and David Relman joined host Michael McFaul on the World Class podcast to discuss what you should know about the virus, its impact on China and the world, and whether there is any truth to the rumors about its origins. 

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Spring 2020 Session of Stanford e-Japan Online Course Begins

News / February 24, 2020

The Stanford University Scholars Program for Japanese High School Students or “Stanford e-Japan” is an online course sponsored by the Yanai Tadashi Foundation and the Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE), Stanford University. This online course teaches Japanese high school students about U.S. society and underscores the importance of U.S.–Japan relations.

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How to Beat a Populist

Commentary / February 24, 2020

"Democrats don’t need to peddle in falsehood or invective to find lively and creative ways to communicate their message of hope, inspiration, and concrete policy alternatives, and to do so with passion and conviction," writes Larry Diamond in The American Interest.

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Francis Fukuyama: Populism is a threat to democracy

Commentary / February 24, 2020

Countries retreating into closed systems and deciding to protect only their own groups could prevent international cooperation on climate change issues which is the only way to avert climate catastrophe, says Francis Fukuyama in conversation with Ana Kasparian. Watch here.

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U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam Meets with Stanford Experts

News / February 21, 2020

APARC’s Southeast Asia Program recently hosted the U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam Dan Kritenbrink, who joined faculty members from the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and other Stanford experts for a roundtable discussion about U.S.-Vietnam relations and U.S. strategy in Southeast Asia.

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Ukraine: Six Years After the Maidan

Commentary / February 20, 2020

February 21 marks the sixth anniversary of the end of Ukraine’s Maidan Revolution. Three months of largely peaceful protests concluded in a spasm of deadly violence. President Victor Yanukovych fled Kyiv and later Ukraine, prompting the Rada (Ukraine’s parliament) to appoint acting leaders pending early elections. 

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Leaving Afghanistan: Pulling out without Pulling the Rug out

Commentary / February 19, 2020

The United States must at some point depart from Afghanistan and bring this costly “forever war” to a conclusion. With over 2,400 U.S. servicemembers killed, many more wounded, and nearly a trillion dollars spent to date, America’s leaders are under an obligation to design and execute a plan that stops a decades-long hemorrhaging of American blood and treasure.

 

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APARC Names 2020-21 Postdoctoral Fellows

News / February 19, 2020

APARC is pleased to announce that two young scholars, Jeffrey Weng and Nhu Truong, have been selected as our 2020-21 Shorenstein postdoctoral fellows on contemporary Asia. They will begin their appointments at Stanford in autumn 2020.

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