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FSI Newsroom

FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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Stanford Legal Experts on the Oklahoma Opioids Verdict and Ongoing Litigation

Q&A / August 29, 2019

On August 26, Judge Thad Balkman delivered a $572 million judgment against pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson for the company’s role in fueling the opioid epidemic in Oklahoma. In the discussion that follows, Stanford Law Professors Michelle Mello and Nora Freeman Engstrom discuss the decision and how other cases tied to the national opioid crisis are developing.

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All Adults Should Be Tested for Hepatitis C; It Now Kills More Americans Than All Other Reportable Infectious Diseases Combined

News / August 27, 2019

A task force of national health experts has released a draft recommendation to screen all adults 18 to 79 years for the hepatitis C virus (HCV), noting the opioid epidemic has fueled what has become the most common chronic bloodborne pathogen in the United States.

 

 
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A ‘Democratic Depression’ Could Be Around the Corner

News / August 26, 2019

Democratic institutions worldwide have reached a unique and precarious turning point, said Larry Diamond on a recent episode of the World Class podcast by the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI).

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Surprise Out-of-Network Billing Skyrockets

News / August 26, 2019

Surprise, out-of-network charges billed to privately insured Americans who received inpatient care at in-network hospitals more than doubled between 2010 and 2016, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Taiwan: Presidential Election 2020 Scene Setter

News / August 26, 2019

This is the first of a series of pieces we intend to publish on societies and elections at risk from online disinformation. Our goal is to draw the attention of the media, tech platforms and other academics to these risks and to provide a basic background that could be useful to those who wish to study the information environment in these areas.

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Fukushima Cesium-Enriched Microparticle (CSMP) Update (Interview with Rod Ewing)

Q&A / August 21, 2019

An interesting paper  was recently published by a team headed by Dr. Satoshi Utsunomiya of Kyushu University on the subject of Fukushima-derived cesium-enriched microparticles (CsMPs).

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SPICE’s Waka Takahashi Brown Receives 2019 Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award

News / August 20, 2019

SPICE’s Stanford e-Japan Manager and Instructor Waka Takahashi Brown has won the 2019 Elgin Heinz Outstanding Teacher Award for her teaching excellence with Stanford e-Japan, an online course that introduces U.S. society and culture and U.S.–Japan relations to high school students in Japan. Stanford e-Japan is currently supported by the Yanai Tadashi Foundation.

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Task Force: Breast and Ovarian Cancer Survivors and Women of Certain At-Risk Ancestry Added to Patients Who Should Be Assessed for Risk of Having the BRCA1/2 Gene Mutation

News / August 20, 2019

The risks of ovarian and breast cancer are as high as 45% and 70%, respectively, in women carrying genetic mutations. So the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is updating its recommendation for primary-care clinicians: They should now consider women with previous breast cancer or ovarian cancer who are considered cancer-free for genetic counseling — and more explicitly include ancestry as a risk factor.

 

 
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Twenty High School Students Accepted into Stanford Online Course on Modern China

News / August 13, 2019

The Stanford China Scholars Program (CSP) is about to launch its fifth session this fall, with 20 high school students from across the country participating in the online course. The Northeast, South, Midwest, Pacific Northwest, Texas, and California are all represented in this cohort of 10th through 12th graders.

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Korea’s Migrants: Towards Diversity and Transnationalism

News / August 9, 2019

South Korea (hereafter Korea) is widely regarded as among the world’s most ethnically and linguistically homogeneous countries. In 1990, Korea counted only 49,000 foreigners amongst its population. But over the last two decades, the number of migrants in the country has grown dramatically, reaching 2.3 million (or 4.5% of the population) in 2018. Just as important is the growing diversity of migrants coming to Korea.

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Going Outside the Bubble to Understand Threats to Democracy

News / August 9, 2019

As a former business executive with IBM and a veteran policymaker, Bonnie Glick is well-equipped to bridge the Silicon Valley — Washington, DC divide.

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Are Strong Parties the Answer?

Commentary / August 8, 2019

"Responsible Parties convincingly shows that across many countries narrow interests can subvert or coopt the policy-making process. This perversion of majoritarianism is epitomized by the 2010 Affordable Care Act, whose creation and implementation were heavily influenced by the insurance lobby, the pharmaceutical lobby, and the states.

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Mass Shootings: Public Face of a Much Larger Epidemic

News / August 8, 2019

Americans have witnessed repeated mass shootings. The carnage in Texas and Ohio last weekend, which claimed 31 lives, has left the nation stunned and angry. Stanford Health Policy's David Studdert notes, however, that mass shootings only represent less than 1% of all the firearms deaths in the United States each year.

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The wrong US response to Russia and China may trigger a “new Cold War.”

Commentary / August 8, 2019

If America frames its response to Russia and China as one of “civilizational struggle,” Diamond says, Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping will only get stronger. Listen and read here

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What to eat in Beijing if you can't handle the heat

Blog / August 8, 2019

This summer I was very fortunate to be able to spend three weeks at the Stanford Center at Peking University (Běidà) for a short course on rheology. It was a really special opportunity for me to experience student life at my dad’s alma mater and get to know friends from Stanford, Peking, Tsinghua and Beihang University.

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The RSP: A Stepping Stone in My Journey with Japan

Blog / August 7, 2019

The following reflection is a guest post written by Stacy Shimanuki, SPICE student intern and a 2018 alum and honoree of the Reischauer Scholars Program. In the fall, she will be a freshman at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Two Experts to Join the Korea Program as Koret Fellows in Korean Studies

News / August 7, 2019

The Korea Program at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center is pleased to welcome Robert R. King and Victor Cha as Koret fellows in Korean studies during the 2019-20 academic year.

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Unpacking the Escalating U.S.-China Conflict: Q&A with David M. Lampton

Q&A / August 6, 2019

The U.S.-China relationship is in a dangerous downward spiral. The crisis in the relationship has spread virtually to every arena, from the intensifying trade war between the two largest economies to their escalating technology rivalry that is rippling into a U.S. government crackdown on foreign influence on research, and from security concerns over China’s growing military power in the Asia-Pacific region to mounting tensions over the antigovernment protests in Hong Kong and over longstanding frictions with respect to Taiwan.

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Draper Hills 2019 Summer Fellows Reflect on Activism, Democracy and the Importance of Collaboration

News / August 5, 2019

Every summer, the Draper Hills Summer Fellows Program brings together international leaders who are pioneering new approaches to advance social and political change in some of the most challenging global contexts. The fellows spend three weeks living and taking classes on the Stanford campus, visiting Silicon Valley tech companies and building a network.

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SPICE Welcomes Summer Student Intern Stacy Shimanuki

News / July 30, 2019

Nearly one year ago on August 10, 2018, SPICE honored the top three students in the 2018 Reischauer Scholars Program (RSP). The students gave presentations based on their final research papers and were honored by their instructor, Naomi Funahashi. One of the RSP honorees was Stacy Shimanuki, then a senior at Amador Valley High School in Pleasanton, California.

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Playing with Fire on Election Security

Commentary / July 29, 2019

"If one foreign power continues to shred, on an ever-more daring basis, the integrity and inviolability of our electoral process, other foreign powers will draw lessons and follow. And they won’t all be pitching in on the Republican side," writes Larry Diamond in The American Interest. Read here.  

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