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FSI Newsroom

FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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China Program Faculty in Beijing for Pilot Program at SCPKU

News / November 9, 2018

A group of 8 Stanford graduate and undergraduate students entered the gates of Stanford Center at Peking University (SCPKU) on September 21st. They are participating in the inaugural fall quarter of China Studies in Beijing, an overseas, pilot program being offered by the Freeman Spogli institute for International Studies in partnership with Peking University. Jay Gonzalez, a Stanford junior, already described his experience as “life-changing” – “exactly what I dreamed of and more.”

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A student reflects on matrix multiplication

News / November 8, 2018

A matrix with m rows and n columns looks like a rectangle filled with tiny boxes: m times n boxes, to be exact. But after visiting the Stanford Center at Peking University (SCPKU) for three months, my mental matrix of the world looked more like a weird trapezoid. New acquaintances added rows and their unique perspectives added columns. My brain drew lines from geography to economics to politics, but the lines were on crumpled paper. Ah and don't forget history. So multiply the rectangle by time t and out comes a 3D trapezoid.

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Understanding the link between preeclampsia and heart disease later in life

News / November 7, 2018

Stanford researchers are awarded a 4-year, $6 million NIH grant to study the links between preeclampsia and subsequent risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) as they grow older.

 

 
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It's a win-win: Hospitals should apologize for mistakes

Q&A / November 6, 2018

Research by Stanford Health Policy’s Michelle Mello looks at what happens when a group of hospitals started systematically acknowledging adverse outcomes in care by  apologizing and proactively offering compensation where substandard care caused serious harm. 

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License to Kill

Commentary / November 6, 2018

"We must make it clear, not only to the Saudi monarchy but to all the world’s dictators, that they cannot murder their opponents with impunity," writes Larry Diamond. Read here

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Midterm Election Hacking Concerns

News / November 5, 2018

Voter registration systems provide an additional target for hackers intending to disrupt the US midterm elections; if voting machines themselves are too disperse or too obvious a target, removing voters from the rolls could have a similar effect. in Esquire, Jack Holmes explains that election security experts consider this one of many nightmare scenarios facing the American voting public—and thus, American democracy itself—on the eve of the 2018 midterm elections. (Allison Berke, Executive Director of the Stanford Cyber Initiative, quoted.)

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Panel Explores K-pop's Impact on Korean Studies

News / November 5, 2018

On November 2, the Korea Program’s Future Visions conference closed with a panel featuring Siwon Choi — a member of Korean boy band Super Junior — and SM Entertainment USA director and music producer Dominique Rodriguez. Panelists spoke about the global reach of Korean pop music (K-pop) and how it could be a key stimulator of Korean studies in America and the rest of the West.

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John Bolton keeps citing this 2002 pact as an arms-control model. It’s really not.

Commentary / November 5, 2018

When the subject of extending the 2010 New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) arises, National Security Advisor John Bolton suggests the 2002 Treaty of Moscow model as a possible alternative. The Russians, however, would never agree to that now. Moreover, the Treaty of Moscow was not good arms control. Trying to replace New START with something like it would be foolish.

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RIP INF: The end of a landmark treaty

Commentary / October 31, 2018

President Donald Trump announced at a campaign rally on October 20 that the United States would withdraw from the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. During his October 22–23 visit to Moscow, National Security Advisor John Bolton confirmed that the president intended to withdraw from the treaty.

Keeping the treaty in place presumably would require that Trump change his mind, which at a minimum would require that the Kremlin agree to take corrective action to come back into compliance. That’s not going to happen.

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APARC Alumni Gather in Beijing and Tokyo, Reflect on Stanford Experience

News / October 26, 2018

5,100 miles separate Tokyo from Stanford. But for Hiroyuki Fukano, the distance was measured in more than miles. It was also a journey of time and memory–of 30 years, to be precise.

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The Sanctions Effect in North Korea: Observations from Rason

Commentary / October 24, 2018
“Prices for some products [in North Korea] have fluctuated slightly, but shortages are not reported, and consumption still continues, " writes Andray Abrahamian for 38 North following a visit to North Korea for the 8th International Rason Trade Fair.
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Break Through: Women in Silicon Valley, Womenomics in Japan Conference Final Report

News / October 24, 2018

On August 9, 2018 the Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center (APARC) Japan Program hosted a conference, "Break Through: Women in Silicon Valley, Womenomics in Japan." Women thought-leaders and entrepreneurs from Stanford, Silicon Valley, and Japan came together to discuss innovative ideas for narrowing the gender gap, and cultivating interpersonal support networks and collaboration across the pacific.

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Indonesian Foreign Policy: Between Two Reefs Again?

Commentary / October 22, 2018
“Now and in years to come, Indonesia will do well to avoid shackling itself to a reactive-passive neutrality between the US and China,” writes Donald K. Emmerson for The Jakarta Post ahead of the 2018 Conference on Indonesian Foreign Policy, held on October 20 in Kota Kasablanka, Jakarta.
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Facing the Demographic Tidal Wave: Collaborative Solutions for an Aging World

News / October 19, 2018

In Beijing’s bustling Chaoyang District stands a multi-story building known as the Gonghe Senior Apartments: a 400-bed nursing home for middle-income seniors who are disabled or suffer from dementia. Why is Gonghe unique and why is it worth considering? Because Gonghe is a public-private partnership (PPP), a collaborative organizational structure supported by the District Civil Affairs Bureau Welfare Division that donated the land and building and the nonprofit Yuecheng Senior Living that operates the facility.

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David M. Lampton Appointed the Oksenberg-Rohlen Fellow at FSI

News / October 17, 2018

The Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University is pleased to announce that renowned China scholar David Michael (“Mike”) Lampton, Hyman Professor of China Studies and Director of the China Studies Program at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies Emeritus, has been appointed the Oksenberg-Rohlen Fellow at FSI. Lampton will be affiliated with FSI’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (Shorenstein APARC), where he will conduct research on contemporary China and U.S.-China relations. Currently he is working on a book with two colleagues on the development of high-speed railways from southern China to Singapore.

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Video: Karen Eggleston on China's Health System

News / October 17, 2018

In this recent lecture at Cornell University’s Contemporary China Initiative, Karen Eggleston, Shorenstein APARC deputy director and the Asia Health Policy Program director, talks about China’s health system reforms, including progress to date in achieving effective universal coverage, priorities set in the national health meetings, Healthy China 2030 goals, and local experiments in strengthening patient-centered integrated care.

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PESD workshop tackles electricity market challenges in a highly-renewables world

News / October 17, 2018

Program on Energy and Sustainable Development (PESD) Director Frank Wolak, Associate DIrector Mark Thurber, and doctoral candidate Trevor Davis led an Electricity Market Simulation Workshop as part of the 2018 Western Electricity Market Forum September 20-21 in Boise, Idaho.  The audience was comprised of regulators and regulatory staff as well as policy makers representing states from across the western U.S.

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Q&A: Paul Wise and World Bank leader Jim Yong Kim

Q&A / October 15, 2018

Stanford Health Policy's Paul Wise held a conversation with Dr. Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank Group about improving the health of the poorest communities around the world.

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Connecting food and agriculture professionals

Q&A / October 12, 2018

The recently launched Stanford Alumni in Food & Ag group aims to bring together Stanford graduates with a background or interest in food and agriculture issues. Tannis Thorlakson, one of the group’s creators, works as the environmental lead for Driscoll’s in the U.S. and Canada, and recently earned her Ph.D. from Stanford’s E-IPER program. She hopes the group will help alumni stay connected with cutting-edge research and stay up-to-date on news within the food and agriculture space.

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Russia vs. Ukraine: More of the same?

Commentary / October 10, 2018

The aggression that Russia unleashed against Ukraine in 2014 is now well into its fifth year. Unfortunately, Moscow has shown no readiness to end the conflict it keeps simmering in the Donbas region in eastern Ukraine, let alone address the status of Crimea. Hopes of a year ago that a U.N. peacekeeping force might offer a path out of the Donbas morass have dimmed. It appears the Kremlin will wait another year, until after the presidential and parliamentary elections in Ukraine, to reconsider its policy.

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Subsidizing private insurance plans to provide Medicare and Medicaid benefits. Is it working?

News / October 10, 2018

U.S. social insurance programs traditionally have been paid out to beneficiaries directly by the federal government. But the last two decades have seen an accelerated effort to subsidize private health insurance plans to provide Medicare and Medicaid benefits.

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