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FSI Newsroom

FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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Identity: The Demand for Dignity and The Politics of Resentment

Commentary / December 20, 2018

"The way that the economy has developed over the past generation is actually gone contrary to a lot of the existing economic models. The Simon Kuznetz phenomenon says it's not just globalization, it's economic growth. As the country is modernizing, as it's growing economically, it does lead to an increase in inequality. When you reach a  certain level of income, the inequality starts to decrease. That was the experience in Europe, in the 19th and 20th century, that was the case in the United States and so forth.

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Why will it take at least ten years for North Korea to abandon its nuclear program? Q&A with Dr. Siegfried Hecker

Q&A / December 19, 2018

Recently, the leaders of the two Koreas met again, and they signed a joint declaration which they said would bring peace to the Peninsula. How do you like the meeting and the declaration? Do you think it helpful to the denuclearizing? If so, how will it help?

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Bloomberg Businessweek: China Built a Global Economy in 40 Years. Now it Has a New Plan

News / December 16, 2018

Bloomberg Businessweek writes on China's historic economic reforms and the future to come, quoting Scott Rozelle and REAP's work on education and human capacity building in rural China. Read full text here.

 

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KF-APARC Korea Program Postdoctoral Fellowship

News / December 14, 2018

The Korea Program at Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University (APARC) welcomes affiliation requests from those applying for the Korea Foundation’s KF Fellowship for Postdoctoral Research. 

Eligibility:

Scholars with a recent PhD in a subject related to Korea within five years who do not currently hold a regular faculty position are eligible to apply. Applicants must have citizenship or permanent residency in a country outside Korea.

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Democratic Capitalism’s Future

Commentary / December 13, 2018

"Are democracy and capitalism compatible? Or, to put it differently: What made democracy and capitalism compatible for decades, even centuries, and what strains this relationship today? The end of the Cold War seemed to settle longstanding debates about the political and economic institutions best able to achieve freedom and security. But a few decades have passed, and our institutions now seem brittle. Longstanding critiques of capitalism are being dusted off and repackaged," writes Didi Kuo in Democracy Journal.

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The divide between Silicon Valley and Washington is a national-security threat

Commentary / December 13, 2018

A silent divide is weakening America’s national security, and it has nothing to do with President Donald Trump or party polarization. It’s the growing gulf between the tech community in Silicon Valley and the policy-making community in Washington.

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Paul Wise: Yemen's cholera epidemic hits children hardest

News / December 11, 2018

Since 2016, two severe cholera outbreaks have impacted more than 1.2 million people. Children account for 30 percent of the infections; more than 2,500 people have died.

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MIP Internship Q&A: Nancy Zhang

Q&A / December 10, 2018

Nancy Zhang is a Ford Dorsey Master's in International Policy (MIP) at Stanford University in the Class of 2019. She spent this past summer working on public sectore reform in Liberia for the World Bank's Development Impact Evaluation (DIME). Funding is made available to MIP students for 10-week summer internships with organizations that work on international policy issues.

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Timothy Josling dies at age 78

News / December 10, 2018

Timothy Josling, a professor emeritus at the former Food Research Institute and an affiliate of The Europe Center known for his encyclopedic knowledge of international agricultural policy, died on Nov. 27.

Timothy Josling, a Stanford professor emeritus of agricultural economics, died at his home in Davis, California, on Nov. 27 after a two-year battle with cancer. He was 78.

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China Studies in Beijing Program: Students Travel to Shandong Province

News / December 8, 2018

As Stanford’s fall quarter draws to a close, the first cohort of students who are participating in Freeman Spogli Institute’s (FSI) inaugural overseas program in Beijing embarked on their final field excursion. The 8 students and 4 Stanford faculty traveled first to Jinan city (济南) (capital of Shandong province), then to Zouping county (邹平), both located in China’s eastern region of Shandong (山东).

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Scholars Discuss Growing Evidence of China’s Interference in American Government and Society

News / December 7, 2018

While Americans may be well acquainted with China’s quest for influence through the projection of power in the diplomatic, economic, and military spheres, they are less aware of the various ways in which Beijing has more recently been exerting cultural and informational influence. According to a new report, some of these ways challenge and even undermine our democratic processes, norms, and institutions.

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A Lecture on the History of Native Americans at SCPKU

News / December 6, 2018

The lecture started with George Sword and described the “colonizing process” from a free life to one of constant negotiation with the federal government and the pressures on the Native Americans to give up their way of life, but most importantly their land.  She also talked about his wife who still despite pressure to "colonize", in the photograph maintained her long hair (in two long neat braids) and traditional attitude in the way she dressed.  This is important because women are the "culture keepers" who often teach language to children and maintain the traditional ways.

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Gi-Wook Shin Appointed William J. Perry Professor of Contemporary Korea

News / December 6, 2018
Stanford Korean studies expert Gi-Wook Shin has been named the William J. Perry Professor of Contemporary Korea, an endowed professorship established jointly by the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) and the School of Humanities and Sciences (H&S). Shin is a professor in the Department of Sociology, senior fellow at FSI, director of the Walter H.
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A Q&A with Hank Greeley: The First Gene-Edited Babies

Q&A / December 6, 2018

Last month, He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, announced the birth of the world’s first gene-edited babies, whose DNA had been edited to reduce the risk of HIV infection.

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New report from Stanford scholars seeks to demystify the biosecurity landscape

News / December 5, 2018

From genome editing to “hacking” the microbiome, advances in the life sciences and its associated technological revolution have already altered the biosecurity landscape, and will continue to do so. What does this new landscape look like, and how can policymakers and other stakeholders navigate this space?

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Report cites concerns about Chinese influence on American institutions

News / December 5, 2018

The following report was originally published by the Hoover Institution.

Scholars from the Hoover Institution, the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and other organizations today issued a report that examines China’s efforts to influence US institutions and calls for protecting American values, norms, and laws from such interference, while also warning against “demonizing” any group of people.

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Francis Fukuyama on the Root of 'Identity' Politics

Q&A / December 4, 2018

CDDRL director Francis Fukuyama believes America's increased political polarization can be traced back to a universal desire for recognition. His latest book, "Identity," digs into the factors that gave rise to President Trump, Brexit and even violent extremist groups.

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Are 'identity politics’ really a threat to democracy?

Q&A / December 4, 2018

CDDRL Director, Francis Fukuyama talks in an interview for Al Jazeera how identity policy is hurting democracy. Watch here.

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