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FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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My trip to Puerto Rico: Learning from the Past How to Better Combat Malaria Today

Blog / May 10, 2019

About the author: Manuel Ramos Maqueda is a Ford Dorsey Master's in International Policy student at Stanford University and a recipient of an FSI research grant, which he used in support of his field research travel to Puerto Rico.

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MIP Feature Friday: Keunwang Nah

Blog / May 10, 2019

Our MIP student, Keunwang Nah, chose Stanford “because it is the birthplace of innovations that change the world, but it can also be the birthplace of sound policy that can manage the potentially negative impacts technology can have on society.” Find out more on our FSI blog. #MIPFeatureFriday 

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A View from the United States

Commentary / May 9, 2019

APARC Postdoctoral Fellow in Contemporary Asia Ketian Zhang provides commentary on U.S. policies toward Southeast Asia in the South China Sea.

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Can Trust Be Verified? Managing 5G Risk in Southeast Asia

Commentary / May 9, 2019

Nothing can fully protect a country from secret malfeasance involving the company it hires to provide and maintain its 5th generation wireless system (5G). But certain steps can lessen the risk.

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Giving voice to the Chinese railroad workers on the 150th anniversary of the First Transcontinental Railroad

Blog / May 9, 2019

Tomorrow marks the 150th anniversary of the completion of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The tracks of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads met at Promontory, Utah, on May 10, 1869. In a ceremony, Central Pacific Railroad President Leland Stanford drove the last spike, now usually referred to as the “Golden Spike,” at Promontory Summit. What has largely been left out of the narrative of the First Transcontinental Railroad is the estimated 15,000 to 20,000 Chinese laborers who worked on the Central Pacific Railroad.

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Facebook’s Former Chief Security Officer Weighs in On the Mueller Report

News / May 8, 2019

Former Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos is relieved that the Mueller Report has finally been released, he confessed to Michael McFaul, director of the Freeman Spogli Institute (FSI), on an episode of the World Class podcast.

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Do Innovation Subsidies Make Chinese Firms More Innovative?

Commentary / May 7, 2019

Motivated by the realization that China’s economic growth model is about to become obsolete, the Chinese government has been using various subsidies to encourage innovations by Chinese firms. This study examines the allocation and impacts of innovation subsidies, using the data from the China Employer Employee Survey (CEES).

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China Economics Expert Urges Pragmatic Approach to U.S. Engagement with China

News / May 6, 2019

 

By 1978, after the “epic impoverishment” borne of Mao’s non-market, ideologically-driven economy, China was almost like “a hot air balloon [that had been held] ten feet underwater” and suddenly let go, described Daniel Rosen, founding partner of the Rhodium Group, before an audience at a recent colloquium organized by Shorenstein APARC’s China Program.

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Michael McFaul Discusses Montana, His First Trip Abroad, and the Importance of Empathy

News / May 6, 2019

Michael McFaul, director of the Freeman Spogli Institute, recently talked about growing up in Montana, his experience living in Russia, and the values that he hopes to instill in his children, as part of the Office for Religious Life’s “What Matters to Me and Why” speaker series. The series is designed to spark conversation between Stanford faculty, administrators and the larger university community on topics including values, beliefs and motivations. Below are highlights from McFaul’s interview with Sughra Ahmed, Stanford’s associate dean for religious life.

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Forum Discusses Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Determining Regional Order

News / May 3, 2019

On Thursday, the third Asia-Pacific Geo-Economic Strategy Forum (APGEO) saw discussion on issues of international strategic cooperation in the Asia-Pacific with a particular focus on the U.S.-Japan relationship. Speakers included experts on defense and foreign affairs, including former U.S. National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster and former Japanese Ministers of Defense.

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MIP Feature Friday: Julia Nuesner

Blog / May 3, 2019

Did you knkow MIP has a joint degree program with Stanford Law? Find out why our graduate student, Julia Neusner, decided to add on the MIP program to her studies on our FSI blog. #MIPFeatureFriday

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How to Keep the Ball Rolling on North Korean Negotiations

Commentary / May 2, 2019

The current stalemate should not be taken as a restless waiting game or a prelude to dejected failure. The situation is frustrating and nerve-wracking to some, but the good news is that neither side is willing to close the window of talks and jump off the lurching — but still running — train of diplomacy.

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MIP Feature Friday: Maho Sugihara

Blog / May 1, 2019

"Being at Stanford is a unique experience... Over time I just became interested in how cyberspace is very realistically connected to our everyday life, and on a larger scale, national security." Read more on our FSI blog on how our MIP student, Maho Sugihara, is focusing on cyber policy and its security implications. #MIPFeatureFriday

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At Carleton College, APARC Scholars Lay Out North Korea's Economic Quandary

Commentary / May 1, 2019

Scholar Andray Abrahamian organized many projects to promote economic change in North Korea over the past decade, including that country’s first two ultimate frisbee tournaments. So when he spoke at Carleton College in Northfield last week, the first thing Abrahamian did was acknowledge the school’s prominence in the sport. [Its intercollegiate team is a perennial power and most of the school’s students play in intramural leagues.]

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The Stanford EPIC fellowship for community college instructors

News / April 30, 2019

Since 2012, SPICE has been proud to collaborate with Stanford Global Studies (SGS) on Title VI-funded initiatives aimed at internationalizing community college curricula. Initially conceived as the Stanford Human Rights Education Initiative (SHREI)—which focused strictly on international human rights issues—in 2014 the initiative evolved into the Education Partnership for Internationalizing Curriculum (EPIC) with a broader focus on international topics relevant to the community college classroom.

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China's Risky Middle East Bet

Commentary / April 29, 2019

China is making a risky bet in the Middle East. By focusing on economic development and adhering to the principle of noninterference in internal affairs, Beijing believes it can deepen relations with countries that are otherwise nearly at war with one another—all the while avoiding any significant role in the political affairs of the region. This is likely to prove naive, particularly if U.S. allies begin to stand up for their interests.

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Nuclear Security, Arms Control and the U.S.-Russia Relationship

Commentary / April 26, 2019

For nearly five decades, Washington and Moscow have engaged in negotiations to manage their nuclear competition. Those negotiations produced a string of acronyms—SALT, INF, START—for arms control agreements that strengthened strategic stability, reduced bloated nuclear arsenals and had a positive impact on the broader bilateral relationship.

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Q&A with Postdoctoral Fellow Sarita Panday

Q&A / April 23, 2019

Sarita Panday’s personal and professional journey from a childhood in a small village in Nepal to an academic career that has taken her across the globe to Australia, Europe, and now Stanford is a story that speaks to the power of education as a life-transforming and world-changing force. Sarita is our 2018-19 postdoctoral fellow in Asia health policy and her research focuses on improving maternal health service provision in Nepal.

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Thurber launches book, talks coal in Germany

News / April 23, 2019

In no other developed country is the role of coal in the energy mix more hotly debated than in Germany. The country has been a leader in renewable energy development, but it also continues to mine and burn substantial quantities of coal, which has thus far blunted its efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Germany hopes to phase out all coal use by 2038, though this target is made more challenging by its concurrent effort to phase out nuclear energy.

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Spring session of Stanford e-Japan online course begins

News / April 22, 2019

The Stanford University Scholars Program for Japanese High School Students or “Stanford e-Japan” is an online course sponsored by the Yanai Tadashi Foundation and the Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE), Stanford University. This online course teaches Japanese high school students about U.S. society and underscores the importance of U.S.–Japan relations.

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A Team of Decision-Scientists Tackles Opioid Epidemic’s Inroads on HIV with NIH MERIT Award

News / April 22, 2019

The opioid epidemic is threatening the hard-fought gains in the prevention and control of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Stanford Health Policy's Douglas K. Owens leads a team of decision scientists who received a highly prestigious NIH MERIT award to tackle the issue.

 

 
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PODCAST: China and the Global Challenges to Democracy: A Conversation with Larry Diamond

Commentary / April 19, 2019

In this episode of the Power 3.0 podcast, Larry Diamond discusses the Chinese Communist Party's range of influence and interference in activities that target the public, civic, and social institutions of democracies.

 

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How Ukraine’s Comedian-Candidate Could Disappoint the Kremlin

Commentary / April 19, 2019

If voters in Ukraine elect television star Volodymyr Zelensky president Sunday, as seems almost certain, that should please the Kremlin, which in the course of supporting rebels in the eastern regions of Ukraine has made clear its dislike for incumbent Petro Poroshenko.

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