Policy Analysis
Paragraphs

Content Moderation

The Twitter Files Are a Missed Opportunity
Renée DiResta, Research Manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory
The Atlantic, 12/15/22

  • Unfortunately, the Twitter Files offer little insight into how important moderation decisions are made.
  • Individual anecdotes – particularly those involving high-stakes outlier decisions, such as how to handle a president whose supporters try to keep his successor’s election from being certified – are interesting but reveal little about how platforms operate day in and day out.
  • Twitter’s most recent transparency report, published in July, shows that it took action on 4.3 million accounts in the second half of 2021 and removed 5.1 million pieces of content. You could cherry-pick a few of those decisions to fit almost any ideological narrative.
  • The current controversy is ironic because downranking emerged as an alternative to more stringent takedowns. As an enforcement option for borderline posts and accounts, reduce supports the premise of “freedom of speech, not freedom of reach.”
  • Journalists and academic researchers shouldn’t have to base their evaluations solely on anecdotes. Twitter could easily provide systematic information about its practices.
  • Because anecdotal examples do help make abstract dynamics clearer to the public, the Twitter Files authors should seek out and share more details about precisely why the high-profile and somewhat controversial accounts they highlighted were subject to specific actions.

Biosecurity Regulations

Strengthen Oversight of Risky Research on Pathogens 
David Relman, Senior Fellow at FSI
Megan Palmer, CISAC Affiliate
Science, 12/08/2022

  • The ‘dual use research of concern’ (DURC) framework should apply to all human pathogens, not just the 15 agents currently listed.
  • Improved review processes must evaluate the risk and potential consequences of accidents, theft or insider diversions.
  • Research proposals should be required to go through independent, government-led risk–benefit assessments to determine whether the work should proceed and under what conditions.
  • The U.S. government should seek nongovernmental expertise for the review process. Currently, the HHS process involves only governmental experts, and the identity of these individuals is not publicly available.
  • All U.S. agencies and institutions that fund work related to the enhancement of potential pandemic pathogens should have that work evaluated under the revised enhanced potential pandemic pathogens framework.

Ukraine and Russia

The Russia-Ukraine War and its Ramifications for Russia
Steven Pifer, Affiliate at CISAC
Brookings, 12/08/22

  • While the war has been a tragedy for Ukraine and Ukrainians, it has also proven a disaster for Russia – militarily, economically, and geopolitically.
  • Ironically for an invasion launched in part due to Kremlin concern that Ukraine was moving away from Russia and toward the West, the war has opened a previously closed path for Ukraine’s membership in the European Union.
  • In addition to coping with the loss of high-tech and other key imports, the Russian economy faces brain drain, particularly in the IT sector, that began in February as well as the departure of more than 1,000 Western companies.
  • The Kremlin has waged a two-front war, fighting on the battlefield against Ukraine while seeking to undermine Western financial and military support for Kyiv. The Russians are losing on both fronts.
  • U.S. policy should remain one of seeking a change in policy, not regime. Yet prospects for improving U.S.-Russian relations appear slim while Putin remains in charge.
  • What happens will depend on how the Russian elite and public view his performance; while some signs of disaffection over the war have emerged, it is still too early to forecast their meaning for Putin’s political longevity.

Protests in China, Iran, Russia

Why Countries That Usually Don't See Dissent Are Now Seeing Their People Protest
Larry Diamond, Mosbacher Senior Fellow in Global Democracy at FSI
NPR | All Things Considered, 12/03/22

  • One element of it is that the regimes have been performing very badly in meeting people's expectations and in governing in a way that people find acceptable and tolerable.
  • China now has such a massive and triangulated surveillance system that they have multiple ways of tracking down people who protested.
  • However, there are always leaks and cracks in the surveillance system. And when people get really angry and protests happen simultaneously in large numbers, there is a kind of surge effect that overwhelms the social and political control mechanism.
  • If Xi Jinping can succeed in instituting a more flexible and rational system for meeting the COVID challenge and if he can regrow economic growth, then he's probably going to be able to survive and restore political stability for some time to come.
  • In Russia, there's growing evidence of elite as well as public dissatisfaction with Putin's ineptitude in prosecuting the war in Ukraine and maybe starting the war. The problem is that there's also a lot of evidence that the most serious and credible opposition to Vladimir Putin is coming from the radical right.
  • Iran is the most vulnerable. They already had a national uprising in 2009, the Green movement, after massively rigged elections that looked like it might topple the regime.
  • So this is a recurrent phenomenon in Iran. And it's very clear there that, as the Iranian human rights activist and Nobel Prize winner Shirin Ebadi said, probably 80% of the country at this point is with the protesters and against the regime.

Protecting Civilians During War

80 Countries Just Signed a Declaration on Protecting Civilians in War
Naomi Egel, Postdoctoral Fellow at CISAC
Washington Post, 11/29/22

  • As Russia’s war against Ukraine illustrates, civilians often bear the brunt of suffering in conflict and wars.
  • They are sometimes directly killed or saddled with lifelong injuries, and sometimes from the destruction of critical infrastructure like hospitals, power plants and sanitation systems needed to survive.
  • International laws of war prohibit targeting civilians — but often fail to protect them in practice.
  • How can this be stopped? Ireland recently organized the development of a multilateral declaration aimed at better protecting civilians from explosive weapons in populated areas.
  • While it’s not a legally binding treaty, this declaration includes new guidelines developed to improve how international humanitarian law gets put into practice.
  • Eighty countries, including the United States, signed this declaration in Dublin on Nov. 18.

Nuclear Deterrence

How Will America Deal with Three-way Nuclear Deterrence?
Rose Gottemoeller, Steven C. Házy Lecturer at CISAC
NBC News, 11/28/22

  • Russia has "unilaterally postponed" nuclear arms control negotiations with the U.S. that were to be held in Egypt in December.
  • The postponement of nuclear arms control talks between the U.S. and Russia are not ultimately concerning. They appear necessary "for technical reasons." 
  • Both the U.S. government and the Russia government often take additional time to get their work finished. If it turns out it's being postponed and turns into a long delay, then there may be something to be concerned about.
  • Both sides are also still working out new inspection methods after the spread of the coronavirus. That has kept inspections from restarting since the original suspension.
  • It's taken a while to work out the COVID protocols – such as what distance do the inspectors have to keep from others? What kind of masks do they have to wear? All those little details have to be worked out and agreed upon.

Receive updates on our policy outreach and engagement straight to your inbox.

All Publications button
0
Publication Type
Policy Briefs
Publication Date
Subtitle

Key policy takeaways from Renée DiResta on the need to understand how platforms moderate content, David Relman and Megan Palmer on strengthening regulations on risky pathogen research, Steven Pifer on the ramifications of the Ukraine-Russia war on the Kremlin, Larry Diamond on the protests in China, Iran, and Russia, Naomi Egel on protecting civilians during war, and Rose Gottemoeller on U.S. nuclear negotiations with Russia.

Authors
Clifton B. Parker
0
Stanford Affiliate, Stanford Center on China's Economy and Institutions
Assistant Professor of Political Science, Stanford University
yiqing-xu_updated_dimension.jpeg
PhD

Yiqing Xu is an Assistant Professor at Department of Political Science, Stanford University. His primary research covers methodology and comparative politics, focusing on China. He received a PhD in Political Science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2016), an MA in Economics from China Center for Economic Research at Peking University (2010) and a BA in Economics (2007) from Fudan University.

His work has appeared in American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, Political Science Research and Methods, among other peer-reviewed journals. He has won several professional awards, including the best article award from American Journal of Political Science in 2016 and the Miller Prize (2018, 2020) for the best work appearing in Political Analysis the preceding year.

Authors
Alice Wenner
News Type
News
Date
Paragraphs

The Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University is pleased to announce that Stephen Kotkin has been appointed to the position of FSI Senior Fellow, effective September 1, 2022.

Kotkin is based at FSI’s Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), and is affiliated with FSI’s Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, as well. He holds a joint appointment with the Hoover Institution as the Kleinheinz Senior Fellow.

"Stephen is a remarkable academic and public intellectual whose work has transformed our understanding of Russian history and the historical processes that have shaped today’s global geopolitics,” said APARC Director Gi-Wook Shin. “We are proud to have him as our colleague at APARC and are excited to work together to expand the center’s scholarship on the role and impact of the Eurasian powers in the era of great-power competition."

Prior to joining FSI, Kotkin was the Birkelund Professor of History and International Affairs in what was formerly known as the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, where he taught for 33 years. He now holds that title as emeritus. In addition to founding and running Princeton’s Global History Initiative, Kotkin directed the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies and served as the founding co-director of the Program in History and the Practice of Diplomacy. He chaired the editorial board of Princeton University Press.

“Joining the ranks of the phenomenal scholars at FSI is a dream come true,” Kotkin stated.

Stephen is a remarkable academic and public intellectual whose work has transformed our understanding of Russian history and the historical processes that have shaped today’s global geopolitics.
Gi-Wook Shin
Director of Shorenstein APARC

Kotkin’s scholarly contributions span the fields of Russian-Soviet, Northeast Asian, and global history. His publications include Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941, and Stalin, Vol. I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928, part of a three-volume history of Russian power in the world and of Stalin’s power in Russia.

"I am thrilled to welcome Stephen to FSI this fall,” said FSI Director Michael McFaul. “He is an excellent addition to the cutting-edge research and teaching team at APARC, and I look forward to seeing the important impact he makes in his new role."

Kotkin writes reviews and essays for The Times Literary Supplement, Foreign Affairs, and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications. He was the business book reviewer for the New York Times Sunday Business Section for a number of years. He earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Rochester in 1981 and received a Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 1988, and during that time took a graduate seminar at Stanford.

Read More

FSI Director Michael McFaul introduces President Volodymyr Zelenskyy at a live video address on May 27, 2022.
News

FSI Director Michael McFaul Honored by the Government of Ukraine with State Award

FSI Director Michael McFaul Honored by the Government of Ukraine with State Award
Jennifer Pan joins the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies as a Senior Fellow working with the Center on China's Economy and Institutions
News

Jennifer Pan to Become FSI’s Newest Senior Fellow

Pan’s research focuses on political and authoritarian politics, including how preferences and behaviors are shaped by political censorship, propaganda, and information manipulation.
Jennifer Pan to Become FSI’s Newest Senior Fellow
Peter Blair Henry
News

Peter Blair Henry Joins the Hoover Institution and Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

A former senior fellow at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, Henry is reprising his roles at FSI and the Hoover Institution to continue his groundbreaking research on economic reforms and the global economy.
Peter Blair Henry Joins the Hoover Institution and Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
All News button
1
Subtitle

Kotkin’s research interests include authoritarianism, geopolitics, global political economy, and modernism in the arts and politics.

0
Stanford Affiliate, Stanford Center on China's Economy and Institutions
Jean Hanna Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution
hanushek2.jpeg

Eric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He is internationally recognized for his economic analysis of educational issues, and his research has had broad influence on education policy in both developed and developing countries. He received the Yidan Prize for Education Research in 2021. He is the author of numerous widely-cited studies on the effects of class size reduction, school accountability, teacher effectiveness, and other topics. He was the first to research teacher effectiveness by measuring students’ learning gains, which forms the conceptual basis for using value-added measures to evaluate teachers and schools, now a widely adopted practice. His recent book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth summarizes his research establishing the close links between countries’ long-term rates of economic growth and the skill levels of their populations. His current research analyzes why some countries’ school systems consistently perform better than others. He has authored or edited twenty-four books along with over 250 articles. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Herbert Hoover Memorial Building 107
434 Galvez Mall
Stanford, CA 94305-6003

650.721.1780
0
Affiliated Scholar, Deliberative Democracy Lab
Kleinheinz Fellow, Hoover Institution
valentin_bolotnyy_-_valentin_bolotnyy.jpg

Valentin Bolotnyy is a Kleinheinz Fellow at the Hoover Institution and an Affiliated Scholar at CDDRL's Deliberative Democracy Lab. He designs and analyzes randomized experiments aimed at understanding how Americans communicate about politics and public policy, and what factors may lead to changes in public opinion on key issues. He also works on forming research partnerships with government agencies to improve public services and gain insight into social behavior. His recent studies have covered the America in One Room experiment, climate adaptation, the gender earnings gap, public infrastructure procurement, immigration policies, and graduate student mental health.

Bolotnyy’s work has received national attention in outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, The Atlantic, Vox, and American Theatre Magazine. He was awarded the Padma Desai Prize in Economics in 2019.

Bolotnyy received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and a BA in Economics and International Relations, with honors and distinction, from Stanford University.

-

Image
Big Data China logo
The event will be webcast live from this page.

The Stanford Center on China’s Economy and Institutions (SCCEI) and the CSIS Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics launch the third feature of the new collaboration, Big Data China, on July 27 at 9 a.m. PDT / 12 p.m. EDT.  The feature, “The AI-Surveillance Symbiosis in China,” highlights the work of professors Noam Yuchtman (London School of Economics) and David Yang (Harvard University) and their colleagues. The feature shows how China‘s large-scale investments in surveillance technology is both enhancing the state‘s capacity to repress dissent and providing commercial advantage to Chinese AI companies operating in the facial recognition and surveillance space.


The event will feature a presentation of the key findings of the analysis and its implications for the Washington policy community by Noam Yuchtman of London School of Economics, David Yang of Harvard University, and Trustee Chair Fellow Ilaria Mazzocco. Trustee Chair Director Scott Kennedy will moderate a panel discussion which will include questions from the public and questions from the audience. The distinguished panelists for the event are: Emily Weinstein of CSET, Paul Mozur of the New York Times, and Trustee Chair non-resident senior associate Paul Triolo


WATCH THE RECORDING

FEATURING

Noam Yuchtman
Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy, London School of Economics and Political Science

David Yang
Assistant Professor of Economics, Harvard University
Emily Weinstein 
Research Fellow, Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), Georgetown University
Paul Mozur
Correspondent, New York Times
Scott Kennedy
Senior Adviser and Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics
Ilaria Mazzocco
Fellow, Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics
Paul Triolo
Senior Associate (Non-resident), Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics
 

EVENT PARTNERS
 

Image
SCCEI and CSIS logos

Virtual Livestream 

Scott Kennedy
Ilaria Mazzocco
Paul Mozur
Paul Triolo
Emily Weinstein
David Yang
Noam Yuchtman
Panel Discussions
Authors
Nora Sulots
News Type
News
Date
Paragraphs

The Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) is pleased to announce that effective July 1, 2022, the Center for Deliberative Democracy (CDD) has transitioned from the Department of Communication to CDDRL as the newly named Deliberative Democracy Lab (DDL).

For the last two decades, CDD has focused its work on the theory and practice of deliberative democracy, especially as implemented via Deliberative Polling® — a concept originated in 1988 by Professor James Fishkin, the Janet M. Peck Chair of International Communication. Sometimes called “the poll with a human face,” Deliberative Polling shows what the public would think about an issue both before and after it has considered an issue in depth under good conditions and with good information.

Under the helm of Fishkin and Associate Director Alice Siu, CDD has conducted over 100 Deliberative Polls in 34 countries at varying levels of government and on a variety of topics. In Mongolia, the Parliament passed ‘The Law on Deliberative Polling’ that requires a national Deliberative Poll prior to any amendments to the constitution. In 2019, a national Deliberative Poll was conducted for such a purpose, and the Parliament subsequently passed amendments based on the Deliberative Poll. Also in 2019, a national US Deliberative Poll called America in One Room brought together over 500 participants in-person to Dallas, TX, where participants discussed policy proposals ranging from immigration to climate to foreign policy. The project was a national controlled experiment with participants recruited by NORC at the University of Chicago and yielded immense media coverage, including a video produced by CNN, a tweet from President Barack Obama, and a front-page article in the New York Times, as well as several Op-Eds in the Times and elsewhere.

"A key tenet of CDDRL's research agenda is identifying ways to foster democracy, both domestically and around the world," said Mosbacher Director Kathryn Stoner. "The work being done by the Deliberative Democracy Lab (DDL) is intrinsically aligned with our Center's mission. The work that Jim Fishkin and his colleagues have already done is truly unique and field-defining. At CDDRL, we look forward to further building on this outstanding track record to establish the Deliberative Democracy Lab as the global hub for developing, administering, and analyzing deliberative polling. No other university has anything like it."

“We believe the methods of deliberative democracy can help cure the ills of our current politics — in the US and around the world,” shared Fishkin. “This partnership with CDDRL and FSI will give us a new basis for trying to make this happen. We are proud to join the impressive collection of scholars already at work here on issues of democracy and political reform.”

We believe the methods of deliberative democracy can help cure the ills of our current politics — in the US and around the world.
James S. Fishkin
Janet M. Peck Chair of International Communication and Director of the Deliberative Democracy Lab

Fishkin, who has been named a Senior Fellow at FSI, will continue to serve as the Lab’s Director alongside Siu as Associate Director, now a Senior Research Scholar at CDDRL. Larry Diamond, the Mosbacher Senior Fellow in Global Democracy at FSI, will also continue to be affiliated with the Lab as a faculty collaborator.

“In the United States and around the world, democracies must find new ways to elicit citizen engagement, deeper public participation in policy-making, and reduce toxic levels of political polarization,” said Diamond. “The method of Deliberative Polling that Jim Fishkin and Alice Siu have developed and applied worldwide has demonstrated impressive progress toward these goals, and it has been my honor to collaborate with them.”

Group of people deliberating around a table
A group deliberating during the America in One Room national Deliberation Poll in Dallas, TX, 2019

Rounding out the team for the newly formed Lab, Tom Schnaubelt, currently Director of the Haas Center for Public Service, will join DDL in a new role as Lecturer and Senior Advisor on Civic Education, effective August 1, 2022. “The Deliberative Democracy Lab is an exciting addition to the work of CDDRL, and as Senior Advisor, Tom Schnaubelt will greatly advance our efforts to promote deliberation and civic engagement among college students,” Diamond added.

Schnaubelt began his tenure at the Haas Center for Public Service at Stanford University in April 2009 and has been actively involved in developing innovative community engagement programs in higher education settings for nearly two decades. Prior to assuming the role of executive director at the Haas Center for Public Service, Tom served as dean for community engagement and civic learning at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside and was the founding executive director of Wisconsin Campus Compact, where he provided leadership for a coalition of thirty-four college and university presidents and chancellors committed to the civic purposes of higher education.

“I’ve been increasingly concerned about the fragility of our democracy,” shared Schnaubelt. “I believe that sustaining, strengthening, and perhaps even saving our democracy is a prerequisite to creating a more just and sustainable world. I also believe that universities have a distinct and important role to play in advancing liberal democracy, particularly through the cultivation of democratic knowledge, habits, skills, and dispositions. As I begin this next chapter, I am grateful for the opportunity, and I am thrilled to be able to be a part of Stanford University’s efforts to build a more perfect union.”

“I believe that sustaining, strengthening, and perhaps even saving our democracy is a prerequisite to creating a more just and sustainable world, and that universities have a distinct and important role to play in advancing liberal democracy."
Tom Schnaubelt

As political polarization becomes a more urgent challenge to democracy in the United States and elsewhere, and as a growing number of democratic jurisdictions look for innovative ways to involve the public more meaningfully in decision-making, the demand for Deliberative Polls is increasing. In its new home at CDDRL, the Lab will be able to enhance its capacity to meet growing demands and expand the contributions it can make to both the study and the practice of deliberative democracy.

Read More

Climate change activists march down a street carrying banners and signs.
Q&As

Together For Our Planet: Americans are More Aligned on Taking Action on Climate Change than Expected

New data from the Center for Deliberative Democracy suggests that when given the opportunity to discuss climate change in a substantive way, the majority of Americans are open to taking proactive measures to address the global climate crisis.
Together For Our Planet: Americans are More Aligned on Taking Action on Climate Change than Expected
monument 2501317 1920 1
Commentary

Presidential candidates advance by being divisive. We can do better than that.

Presidential candidates advance by being divisive. We can do better than that.
meeting 152506 1280
Commentary

What if There’s a Better Way to Handle Our Democratic Debate?

What if There’s a Better Way to Handle Our Democratic Debate?
Hero Image
All News button
1
Subtitle

The Deliberative Democracy Lab (formerly the Center for Deliberative Democracy) is devoted to research about democracy and public opinion obtained through Deliberative Polling® and related democratic processes.

-

Image
NKDB Korean translated version of North Korean Conundrum

 

The North Korean Conundrum: Balancing Human Rights and Nuclear Security 
북한의 난제: 인권과 핵안보의 균형
한국어 번역판 발간 행사 북토크

In association with the Database Center for North Korean Human Rights (NKDB), a book talk on the Korean translated version of The North Korean Conundrum: Balancing Human Rights and Nuclear Security is held in Seoul, Korea. 

For more information about the book, please visit the publication webpage.

<Consecutive Korean-English interpretation is provided at the book talk event>

Presenters:

Gi-Wook Shin, Director of Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University

Robert R. King, former Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Issues

Joon Oh, former South Korean Ambassador to the UN

Minjung Kim, Associate Executive Director, Save North Korea

Discussants:

Yeosang Yoon, Chief Director, Database Center for North Korean Human Rights

Haley Gordon, Research Associate, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University

Sookyoung Kim, Assistant Professor, Hanshin University

In-Person event in Korea
June 8, 2PM-5PM, Korea Time
Schubert Hall, Hotel President, Seoul

Seminars
-

Image
Big Data China logo
Join the CSIS Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics and the Stanford Center on China’s Economy and Institutions (SCCEI) for the launch of the second feature of their collaboration, Big Data China, on May 27, 12:00-1:15 pm ET. Our latest digital report, “How Inequality Is Undermining China’s Prosperity,” written by CSIS Fellow Ilaria Mazzocco, highlights the path-breaking work of Stanford scholars Scott Rozelle, Hongbin Li, and their colleagues. By analyzing data on inequality and its sources, the feature shows how trends in China’s labor market, educational attainment, automation, and rural employment are conspiring to harden inequality, which could hurt prospects for growth and undermine political stability. These developments will complicate how the United States should address the China challenge in the years ahead.

Following a presentation by Scott Rozelle of Stanford University on the key findings of the analysis and its implications for the Washington policy community, Trustee Chair Fellow Ilaria Mazzocco will moderate the panel discussion and questions from the audience. The distinguished panelists for the event include Mary Gallagher of the University of Michigan, Mary E. Lovely of the Peterson Institute and Syracuse University, and Martin K. Whyte of Harvard University.


Watch the Recording:

FEATURING

Scott Rozelle
Helen F. Farnsworth Senior Fellow, FSI and SIEPR,
& Co-director, SCCEI, 
Stanford University

Mary Gallagher
Professor, Democracy, Democratization, and Human Rights, University of Michigan
Mary E. Lovely
Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute
for International Economics;
Professor Emeriturs, Department
of Economics, Syracuse University
Martin K. Whyte
Professor Emeritus, International Studies and Sociology, Harvard University
Ilaria Mazzocco
Fellow, Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics
 

 

EVENT PARTNERS
 

Image
SCCEI and CSIS logos

Virtual Livestream 

Mary Gallagher
Mary Lovely
Ilaria Mazzocco
Scott Rozelle
Martin Whyte
Panel Discussions
Authors
Nora Sulots
News Type
News
Date
Paragraphs

Congratulations to Carson Smith, a graduate of CDDRL's 2018-19 Fisher Family Honors Program, on her selection as a 2022 Knight-Hennessy Scholar. Knight-Hennessy Scholars cultivates and supports a multidisciplinary and multicultural community of graduate students from across Stanford University, and delivers engaging experiences that prepare graduates to be visionary, courageous, and collaborative leaders who address complex challenges facing the world.

At CDDRL, Smith wrote her thesis on Conflict Resolution in Tribal Societies: The Community Impact of Non-Indians in Peacemaking Processes. When asked what initially attracted her to the Fisher Family Honors Program, she shared at the time: "I really enjoy the interdisciplinary approach of this program. For example, CDDRL gave me an opportunity to work with professors at the law school, who have the most expertise in my area of research. Additionally, because we all study separate subjects, I have learned about a wide range of methodologies and areas of research from my peers."

The Knight-Hennessy Scholars press release is available here, and the announcement from the Stanford Report is below.

All News button
1
Subtitle

Carson Smith (honors class of 2018-19) is among 70 scholars in the Knight-Hennessy Scholars' fifth cohort.

Subscribe to Policy Analysis
Top