Governance

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Governance

Addressing issues of democracy, dictatorship, corruption and poverty, our scholars and practitioners produce expert research and train civil society activists around the world.

Research Spotlight

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Global Populisms and Their Challenges

A white paper by the Stanford Global Populisms Project finds that established mainstream political parties are the key enablers of populist challenges—and the key solution.
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Protecting Electoral Integrity In the Digital Age

Today, free and fair elections, the primary expression of democratic will for collective government, are far from guaranteed in many countries around the world. Protecting them will require a new set of policies and actions from technological platforms, governments, and citizens.
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30 Years of World Politics: What Has Changed?

Francis Fukuyama argues that sustaining democracy will require rebuilding the legitimate authority of the institutions of liberal democracy, while resisting those powers that aspire to make nondemocratic institutions central.

Featured Scholars

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Larry Diamond

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Larry Diamond

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science and Sociology
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Anna Grzymala-Busse

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Anna Grzymala-Busse

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Director of The Europe Center
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Didi Kuo

Senior Research Scholar
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Didi Kuo

Senior Research Scholar
Associate Director for Research at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law
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Stephen Stedman

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Stephen Stedman

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Deputy Director at the Center on Democracy Development and the Rule of Law

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Publications

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Journal Articles

Abiding Sovereignty

Stephen Krasner
International Political Science Review, 2001 July 1, 2001

Over the several hundred years during which the rules of sovereignty including non-intervention and the exclusion of external authority have been widely understood, state control could never be taken for granted. States could never isolate themselves from the external environment. Globalization and intrusive international norms are old, not new, phenomena. Some aspects of the contemporary environment are uniquethe number of transnational nongovernmental organizations has grown dramatically, international organizations are more prominent; cyber crime could not exist without cyber space.

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Journal Articles

"Managed Democracy" in Russia: Putin and the Press

Michael McFaul
Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, 2001 July 1, 2001

A little more than a year ago, the question Who is Vladimir Putin? was rather fashionable. And it was valid, because this former junior-level KGB officer rose to become prime minister and then president of Russia with amazing speed. After winning the March 2000 presidential election, Putin said all the right things about markets and democracy. For anyone who worked to overthrow Soviet communism, the rise to power of an ex-spy in postcommunist Russia could only be interpreted as alarming.

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Working Papers

An Analysis of U.S. Defense and Economic Adjustment Programs in Russia

Linn Schulte-Sasse
CISAC, 2001 July 1, 2001

The dissolution of the Soviet Union has presented unique opportunities as well as challenges for U.S. national interests and for U.S.-Russian relations--both in traditional security and non-security-related arenas. The last decade of transition has provided an opportunity for improved cooperation between the United States and Russia on both economic and political matters, as Russia has increasingly voiced the notion that "free-market democracy" (Russian-style) is a desired conclusion to its transitional period. Since 1991, there have been many collaborative efforts, involving the U.S.

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Working Papers

Refinement of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Quality Indicators

Sheryl M. Davies, Jeffrey J. Geppert, Mark B. McClellan, Kathryn M. McDonald, Patrick Romano, Kaveh Shojania
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2001 May 1, 2001

Healthcare quality has received heightened attention over the last decade, leading to a growing demand by providers, payers, policymakers, and patients for information on quality of care to help guide their decisions and efforts to improve health care delivery. At the same time, progress in electronic data collection and storage has enhanced opportunities to provide data related to health care quality. In 1989, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR, now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, AHRQ) initiated the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP).

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Working Papers

Growth of Freedoms in China, The

Henry S. Rowen
Shorenstein APARC, 2001 May 1, 2001

My argument in this paper is that the people of the People's Republic of China have acquired greater freedoms over the past twenty years, and that if China 's impressive rate of economic development continues,so will their liberties.

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Working Papers

Health Care 2000: Do Health Care Markets Require a New Model? Proceedings of a Conference Held May 4-5, 2000 at Stanford University

Various international speakers
Shorenstein APARC, 2001 May 1, 2001

On May 4 and 5, 2000, health care leaders, professionals, and academics convened at the Bechtel Conference Center at Stanford University for the Health Care Conference 2000. Sponsored by the Comparative Health Care Policy Research Project at the Asia/Pacific Research Center (Shorenstein APARC), in cooperation with the Center for Health Policy (CHP), the conference was held for the purpose of discussing health care policies and issues facing nations today.

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Working Papers

Creating an Environment: Developing Venture Capital in India

Rafiq Dossani, Martin Kenney
Shorenstein APARC and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, 2001 May 1, 2001

In the last decade, one of the most admired institutions among industrialists and economic policymakers around the world has been the U.S. venture capital industry. A recent OECD (2000) report identified venture capital as a critical component for the success of entrepreneurial high-technology firms and recommended that all nations consider strategies for encouraging the availability of venture capital. With such admiration and encouragement from prestigious international organizations has come various attempts to create an indigenous venture capital industry.

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Journal Articles

Correspondence: Responding to Chemical and Biological Threats

Scott D. Sagan
International Security, 2001 April 1, 2001

The official U.S. government policy is to maintain "calculated ambiguity" about whether the United States would retaliate with nuclear weapons in response to an adversary's use of chemical weapons (CW) or biological weapons (BW) against U.S. allies, U.S. armed forces overseas, or the U.S. homeland. Since the 1991 Gulf War, numerous civilian and military leaders have stated that the United States might use nuclear weapons in response to CW and BW threats or attacks, and some have even stated that the United States will use nuclear weapons in such circumstances.

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Journal Articles

Biological Terrorism and Public Health

Christopher F. Chyba
Survival, 2001 April 1, 2001

A biological terrorist attack probably would first be detected by doctors or other health-care workers. The speed of a response would then depend on their rapid recognition and communication that certain illnesses appeared out of the ordinary. For this reason, preparing for biological terrorism has more in common with confronting the threat of emerging infectious diseases than with preparing for chemical or nuclear attacks. Defense against bioterrorism, like protection against emerging diseases, must therefore rely on improved national and international public-health surveillance.

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Policy Briefs

Verifying the Agreed Framework

Michael M. May, Chaim Braun, George Bunn, Zachary Davis, James Hassberger, Ronald Lehman, Wayne Ruhter, William Sailor, Robert Schock, Nancy Suski
Center for Global Security Research; CISAC, 2001 April 1, 2001

A joint Stanford University-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory team of scientists, nuclear engineers and arms control experts has concluded in a new study that North Korea's compliance with the 1994 Agreed Framework can be verified to a satisfactory degree of accuracy. Special effort, however, will be needed from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), as well as support from the US, the Republic of Korea (ROK), Japan and perhaps other countries. Most importantly, cooperation and openness from North Korea are essential.

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Policy Briefs

Policy Reforms and Mexican Agriculture: Views from the Yaqui Valley

Rosamond L. Naylor, Walter P. Falcon, Arturo Puente Gonzalez
CIMMYT, 2001 April 1, 2001

The overall effects of policy reforms enacted during the 1990s in Mexico on financial and economic profitability of Yaqui Valley agriculture are assessed in this study, which describes the reforms,examines how exogenous shocks affected the reform process,and documents how rural people and institutions adjusted to the changed circumstances. Virtually all of the reforms affected Yaqui Valley farmers because of the commercial character of their agriculture (relatively large, irrigated wheat farms), their close proximity to the US,and the new "openness" of Mexico's economy.

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Journal Articles

Prospects for Improved Decision Making about Medical Necessity

Sara J Singer, Linda A. Bergthold
Health Affairs, 2001 January 1, 2001

With the backlash against managed care, medical necessity has become the focus of increasing controversy. California's health care marketplace has provided some unique opportunities to understand the role of medical necessity in managed care decisionmaking, as the legislature and stakeholders have discovered how little consensus there is on itsmeaning, ownership, and application. Nevertheless , many decisionmakers agree that medical necessity decisions generally involve authorizing treatment for an individual patient.

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Working Papers

Foreign Direct Investment in New Electricity Generating Capacity in Developing Asia: Stakeholders, Risks, and the Search for a New Paradigm

Robert Thomas Crow
Shorenstein APARC, 2001 January 1, 2001

The rate of investment sufficient to provide developing Asia with a reasonably adequate supply of electricity is immense, ranging from a World Bank estimate of 2000 megawatts (MW) each month (which translates into an annual investment of about $35 billion per year) to even higher estimates. All of the larger countries of developing Asia have been looking for foreign direct investment (FDI) to provide a significant amount of the needed capital.

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Journal Articles

How People View Democracy: Halting Progress in Korea and Taiwan

Yun-han Chu, Larry Diamond, Doh Chull Shin
Journal of Democracy, 2001 January 1, 2001

Judging from their citizens middling levels of support for and satisfaction with democracy, both Korea and Taiwan are still far from democratic consolidation.

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Books

Managing the Pentagon's International Relations

Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, Christiana Briggs, Anja Manuel
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, 2000 December 31, 2000

Book abstract:

This book addresses the organization and management of the national security establishment, and especially the Department of Defense, to implement the policies the nation's leaders choose for it, to manage the programs they direct, and to adapt to a changing world.

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Journal Articles

Simple Model for Calculating Ballistic Missile Defense Effectiveness, A

Dean Wilkening
Science and Global Security, 2000 December 31, 2000

This paper develops a probabilistic model that can be used to determine the technical performance required for a defense to meet specific political/military objectives. The defense objective is stated as a certain probability that no warheads leak through the defense. The technical performance is captured by the interceptor single-shot probability of kill and the warhead detection, tracking, and classification probability. Attacks are characterized by the number of warheads and undiscriminated decoys.

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Books

Foreword, "Organizations, Policy, and the Natural Environment"

John Meyer
Stanford University Press, 2000 December 31, 2000

This book brings together emerging perspectives from organization theory and management, environmental sociology, international regime studies, and the social studies of science and technology to provide a starting point for discipline-based studies of environmental policy and corporate environmental behavior. Reflecting the book's theoretical and empirical focus, the audience is two-fold: organizational scholars working within the institutional tradition, and environmental scholars interested in management and policy.

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Books

Electoralism: Why Elections Are Not Democracy

Terry Karl
Congressional Quarterly Press, in "The International Encyclopedia of Elections", 2000 December 31, 2000

The first-ever encyclopedic examination of elections and electoral concepts worldwide. Written by a distinguished international team of scholars.

Elections are of fundamental importance in countries around the world, especially as democracy continues to spread. As more and more of the world's people are winning the right to select their leaders in free and competitive elections, many elections are poorly understood by the electorate, as well as by the world at large and electoral institutions vary greatly from country to country.

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Books

Institutional Reform and Democratic Consolidation in Korea

Larry Diamond, Doh Chull Shin
Hoover Institution Press, 2000 December 31, 2000

Having undergone a transition from military authoritarian rule in 1987, Korea quickly became the most powerful democracy in East Asia other than Japan. But the onset of a major economic crisis revealed the dark side of the Korean model of democracy. With that crisis, and the subsequent election of the country's most determined opposition figure as president, serious questions have arisen about the new democracy's vitality.

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Books

Foreword to "China and Democracy: The Prospect for a Democratic China"

Larry Diamond
Routledge in "China and Democracy: The Prospect for a Democratic China", Suisheng Zhao, ed., 2000 December 31, 2000

This timely collection brings together many well-known scholars to systematically explore China's current government and assess that transition toward democracy. The contributors seek to bridge the gap between normative theories of democracy and empirical studies of China's political development by providing a comprehensive overview of China's domestic history, economy, and public political ideologies.

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Books

Russia on the Eve of the 1999 Duma Elections

Michael A. McFaul, Andrei Ryabov, Nikolai Petrov
Moscow Carnegie Center, 2000 December 31, 2000

The first product of the Carnegie Moscow Center's research on the 1999 Duma elections. It includes an analysis of the political situation and allignment of electoral forces on the eve of the elections, descriptions of the campaigns and policy platforms of the main electoral associations and blocs, and analysis of the electorate's fluctuating political preferences. Separate chapters are devoted to the electoral campaigns in the following regions: Saint Petersburg, Altai and Stavropol Krais, and the Samara and Tverskoi regions.

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Journal Articles

Is Travel Distance a Barrier to Veterans' Use of VA Hospitals for Medical-Surgical Care

C Mooney, J Zwanziger, Ciaran S. Phibbs, S Schmitt
Social Science and Medicine, 2000 December 31, 2000

Lengthy travel distances may explain why relatively few veterans in the United States use VA hospitals for inpatient medical/surgical care. We used two approaches to distinguish the effect of distance on VA use from other factors such as access to alternatives and veterans' characteristics. The first approach describes how disparities in travel distance to the VA are related to other characteristics of geographic areas. The second approach involved a multivariate analysis of VA use in postal zip code areas (ZCAs).

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Books

Russia's Second Chechen War: Ten Assumptions in Search of a Policy

Gail Lapidus
The Swedish Institute of International Affairs (Stockholm), 2000 December 31, 2000

The military campaign unleashed in Chechnya in September 1999 was portrayed by the Russian leadership as a limited and carefully targeted counter-terrorist operation aimed at eliminating the threat to Russia posed by "international terrorism." In a 14 November article in the New York Times, then Prime Minister Putin sought to deflect American criticism of Russian actions and to win acquiescence, if not sympathy, by likening Russias effort in Chechnya to U.S. anti-terrorist actions.

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Books

Origins of Military Doctrines and Command and Control Systems; and Conclusions: Planning the Unthinkable, The

Scott D. Sagan, Peter R. Lavoy, Lewis A. Dunn
Cornell University Press in "Planning the Unthinkable: How New Powers Will Use Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Weapons", 2000 December 31, 2000

The proliferation of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons is now the single most serious security concern for governments around the world. Peter R. Lavoy, Scott D. Sagan, and James J. Wirtz compare how military threats, strategic cultures, and organizations shape the way leaders intend to employ these armaments. They reveal the many frightening ways that emerging military powers and terrorist groups are planning the unthinkable by preparing to use chemical, biological, or nuclear weapons in future conflicts.

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Books

Institutional Change and Healthcare Organizations: From Professional Dominance to Managed Care

W. Richard Scott, M Ruef, P Mendel, CA Caronna
University of Chicago Press, 2000 December 31, 2000

Few large institutions have changed as fully and dramatically as the U.S. healthcare system since World War II. Compared to the 1930s, healthcare now incorporates a variety of new technologies, service-delivery arrangements, financing mechanisms, and underlying sets of organizing principles.

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