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Journal Article

Masahiko Aoki
Socio-Economic Review, 2013

This article first provides a game-theoretic, endogenous view of institutions and then applies the idea to identify the sources of institutional trajectories of economies development in China, Japan, and Korea. It stylises the Malthusian phase of the East Asian economies as a peasant-based economies in which small conjugal families self-managed their working times between farming on small plots—leased or owned—and handcrafting for personal consumption and markets. It then compares institutional arrangements across these economies that sustained otherwise similar economies.

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Journal Article

Thomas Hegghammer
American Political Science Review, 2013

This article studies variation in conflict theater choice by Western jihadists in an effort to understand their motivations. Some militants attack at home, whereas others join insurgencies abroad, but few scholars have asked why they make these different choices. Using open-source data, I estimate recruit supply for each theater, foreign fighter return rates, and returnee impact on domestic terrorist activity. The tentative data indicate that jihadists prefer foreign fighting, but a minority attacks at home after being radicalized, most often through foreign fighting or contact with a veteran.

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Journal Article

Timothy Junio
Journal of Strategic Studies, 2013

Many well-established explanations for war suggest that cyber weapons have a greater chance of being used offensively than other kinds of military technologies. This response article introduces a research agenda for the study of cyber war, and offers an example – principal-agent problems in cyber operations – to demonstrate how rigorous theoretical and empirical work may proceed.

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Working Paper

Francis Fukuyama
2013

This paper points to the poor state of empirical measures of the quality of states, that is, executive branches and their bureaucracies. Much of the problem is conceptual, since there is very little agreement on what constitutes high-quality government. The paper suggests four approaches: (1) procedural measures, such as the Weberian criteria of bureaucratic modernity; (2) capacity measures, which include both resources and degree of professionalization; (3) output measures; and (4) measures of bureaucratic autonomy.

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Journal Article

Xiaopeng Pang, Junxia Zeng, Scott Rozelle
The China Quarterly, 2013

Officials in China claim that voting rates in rural village elections are high. Unfortunately, these rates are assumptions, not facts. The true voting rate is lower, and much lower for women. We postulate that this could be due to insufficient knowledge about their rights.

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Journal Article

Junxia Zhang, Xiaopeng Pang, Linxiu Zhang, Scott Rozelle, Alexis Medina
2013

Although almost everyone agrees that there was gender inequality in China’s education system in the 1980s, the economics of education literature in China has mixed evidence on improvements in gender inequality in educational attainment over the past three decades. Some papers suggest gender inequality is still severe; others report progress. We seek to understand the progress China has made (if any) in reducing gender inequality in education since the 1980s.

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Journal Article

Masahiko Aoki, Geoffrey Rothwell
Energy Policy, 2013

This paper analyzes the causes, responses, and consequences of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident (March 2011) by comparing these with Three Mile Island (March 1979) and Chernobyl (April 1986). We identify three generic modes of organizational coordination: modular, vertical, and horizontal. By relying on comparative institutional analysis, we compare the modes' performance characteristics in terms of short-term and long-term coordination, preparedness for shocks, and responsiveness to shocks.

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Journal Article

Daryl G. Press, Scott D. Sagan, Benjamin A. Valentino
American Political Science Review, 2013
How strong are normative prohibitions on state behavior? The authors examine this question by analyzing anti-nuclear norms, sometimes called the “nuclear taboo,” using an original survey experiment to evaluate American attitudes regarding nuclear use. The authors find that the public has only a weak aversion to using nuclear weapons and that this aversion has few characteristics of an “unthinkable” behavior or taboo. Instead, public attitudes about whether to use nuclear weapons are driven largely by consequentialist considerations of military utility. Americans’ willingness to use nuclear weapons increases dramatically when nuclear weapons provide advantages over conventional weapons in destroying critical targets. Americans who oppose the use of nuclear weapons seem to do so primarily for fear of setting a negative precedent that could lead to the use of nuclear weapons by other states against the United States or its allies in the future.
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Book

Kym Anderson
Center on Food Security and the Environment, 2013

For decades, earnings from farming in many developing countries, including in Sub-Saharan Africa, have been depressed by a pro-urban and anti-trade bias in own-country policies, as well as by governments of richer countries favoring their farmers with import barriers and subsidies. Both sets of policies reduced global economic welfare and agricultural trade, and almost certainly added to global inequality and poverty and to food insecurity in many low-income countries.

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Journal Article

Karl Eikenberry, Karl Eikenberry
The Journal of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, 2013

This article draws from the annual lecture in ‘U.S. Security in the 21st Century Series,’ sponsored by the National Committee on American Foreign Policy; it was delivered by the author on September 27, 2012, in New York City.  It explores the U.S.

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Journal Article

Thomas Fingar, Fan Jishe
The Washington Quarterly, 2013

Abstract

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Journal Article

Kenji Kushida, Kaoru (Kay) Shimizu
Socio-Economic Review, 2013

This paper examines how diversely organized capitalist societies evolve by analyzing the transformation of Japan’s financial system since the 1990s. The banking, securities and insurance, as well as the postal financial institutions changed significantly, but are hardly converging to Anglo-American or ‘liberal market’ models. The authors contend that Japan’s new financial system is best characterized as syncretic, with new, traditional and hybrid forms of practices, organizations and norms coexisting.

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Journal Article

Daniel Sneider
The International Economy, 2013

In an International Economy article, Daniel C. Sneider explores the troubling history of China-Japan tension. He concludes that China and Japan have every reason to pull back from

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Journal Article

Xinxin Chen, Yaojiang Shi, Di Mo, James Chu, Prashant Loyalka, Scott Rozelle
China & World Economy, 2013

A significant gap remains between rural and urban students in the rate of admission to senior high school. One reason for this gap may be the high levels of tuition and fees for senior high school. By reducing student expectations of attending high school, high tuition and fees can reduce student academic performance in junior high school. In this paper we evaluate the impact of a senior high tuition relief program on the test scores of poor, rural seventh grade students in China.

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Working Paper

Amanda Fielding
2013

Abstract:

The purpose of this text is to present the proposals of drug policy reform elaborated by the Beckley Foundation for the Government of Guatemala, as part of the agreement set between these two bodies. Amanda Feilding was invited by President Otto Pérez Molina to establish a Beckley Foundation Latin American Chapter in Guatemala in July 2012, and was requested to produce a rigorous, evidence-based analysis of the impact of current prohibitionist drug policies on Guatemala and the wider region.

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Journal Article

Yihua Yang, Linxiu Zhang, Junxia Zeng, Xiaopeng Pang, Fang Lai, Scott Rozelle
Computer & Education, Elsevier, 2013

Experts agree that computers and computing play an important role in education. Since the 1980s there has been a debate about gender as it relates to computers and education. However, results regarding gender differences concerning computer use in education are not consistent. In particular there is little work done in China on this issue. Therefore, the overall goal of this paper is to demonstrate whether girls and boys can gain equally from computer-based education in China’s elementary schools.

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Journal Article

Petra Moser
Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2013
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