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Stanford scholar proposes new policy to curb resource curse in Africa

News / August 21, 2013
In the coming decade new oil discoveries in Africa will leave fragile democracies vulnerable to corruption, patronage and rent seeking behavior. In a piece co-written in Foreign Affairs, CDDRL Director Larry Diamond advocates a new scheme to directly distribute oil revenue to citizens in the form of taxable income. This oil-to-cash system would strengthen accountability and increase citizens ownership of state resources.
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Book: "Weill's Musical Theater: Stages of Reform", written by Stephen W. Hinton

News / August 20, 2013
Music professor Stephen Hinton's study of the works by Kurt Weills, German music composer.
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Stanford scholars find varying quality of education in BRICs

News / August 20, 2013
In an effort to create world-class university systems, Brazil, Russia, India and China are funneling resources to higher education institutions. FSI affiliates Martin Carnoy and Prashant Loyalka look at the effects of such an expansion and whether these grads can compete in the global knowledge economy.
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Eikenberry: Counterinsurgency fails in Afghanistan

News / August 20, 2013
The counterinsurgency plan in Afghanistan hinged on the assumption that the U.S. military could protect the population, that foreign aid could make the Afghan government more accountable, and that the Karzai administration shared U.S. goals. In an article published by Foreign Affairs, Karl Eikenberry – the William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at CISAC – explains why all three assumptions were "spectacularly incorrect."
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One of the greatest nuclear nonproliferation stories never told

Q&A / August 19, 2013
CISAC's Siegfried Hecker has spent nearly two decades working with Russian and Kazakh scientists and engineers to secure the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site where fissile material was vulnerable to a rogue state or potential terrorists looking to build a bomb.
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SCPKU holds first graduate seminar on Chinese art history

News / August 19, 2013
SCPKU held its first graduate seminar in Summer 2013. Taught by Professor Richard Vinograd in Stanford's Department of Art and Art History, the seminar was entitled "Site-Based Art Historical Research in China: Issues and Opportunities." Professor Vinograd recently shared his perspectives on the course and his research on Chinese art history.
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Book: "Futurity: Contemporary Literature and the Quest for the Past", written by Amir Eshel

News / August 16, 2013
Bringing together postwar German, Israeli, and Anglo-American literature, Professor Amir Eshel (German Studies and Comparative Literature) traces a shared trajectory of futurity in world literature.
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Journal Article: "The role of oversight committees in closed rule legislation", written by Christophe Crombez and Wim Van Gestel

News / August 16, 2013
Center Consulting Professor Christophe Crombez and University of Leuven Doctoral Scholar Wim Van Gestel's article formulating a game-theoretical model of closed rule legislation is soon to be published in be published in the The Journal of Theoretical Politics.
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Journal Article: "Mass Support for Global Climate Agreements Depends on Institutional Design", written by Michael Bechtel and Kenneth Scheve

News / August 16, 2013
Political Science professors Kenneth Scheve (Stanford) and Michael Bechtel's (University of Gallen) article on global climate agreements looks at how costs and distribution, participation, and enforcement affects the public support needed to sustain international efforts over the long run.
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Book: "Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Russia", written by Nancy Kollmann

News / August 16, 2013
History professor Nancy Kollmann relates the contrast between Russian law and its pragmatic application in the 17th and early 18th centuries to the country's social and political stability and puts Russian developments in the context of early-modern European state-building strategies and practices.
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Book: "Uncivil Unions: The Metaphysics of Marriage in German Idealism & Romanticism", written by Adrian Daub

News / August 16, 2013
German Studies assistant professor Adrian Daub takes an interdisciplinary approach in this study of the development of the metaphysical concept of marriage.
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New Shorenstein APARC book analyzes the rise, policies, and fall of Japan's DPJ

News / August 16, 2013
Japan under the DPJ endeavors to explain the DPJ's rapid rise to power in 2009, examines the limited policy change that occured while the party was in power, and analyzes what led to the party's dramatic fall in 2012.
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A story of hope: CISAC and UN visit refugee camps in Rwanda

News / August 14, 2013
In May 2013, CISAC traveled with UNHCR to refugee camps in Rwanda as part of the Stanford-UNHCR Project on Rethinking Refugee Communities. Learn more about their trip through this online journal.
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Irrigation waters more than crops in Africa

News / August 13, 2013

A new study by Center on Food Security and the Environment researchers finds that smallholder irrigation systems - those in which water access (via pump or human power), distribution (furrow, watering can, sprinkler, drip lines, etc.), and use all occur at or near the same location - have great potential to reduce hunger, raise incomes and improve development prospects in an area of the

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Fukushima Reinforces Worst Fears for Japanese Who Are Anti-Nuclear Power

News / August 8, 2013
How are the Japanese people reacting to the news of the continuing contamination leak and what does it mean for Japan's energy policy? In an interview with PBS NewsHour on August 8, Kenji Kushida speaks about what the government may do to stop the flow.
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Hiroshima Pledge: From Ground Zero to Global Zero

News / August 8, 2013
A survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, 68 years ago, recalls the horror of that day before a Stanford delegation led by Scott Sagan, who is helping the city reinvent itself as a beacon for Global Zero - the movement for a world without nuclear weapons.
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Kathleen Stephens, 2013–14 Koret Fellow, to join the Korean Studies Program

News / August 7, 2013
Kathleen Stephens, former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea, will join the Korean Studies Program (KSP) at Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (Shorenstein APARC) as the program’s 2013–14 Koret Fellow.
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Hecker: India's first-class nuclear program can still learn from Fukushima

News / July 30, 2013
CISAC's Sig Hecker talks to one of India's top newspapers about why he admires that country's nuclear energy program. India's world-class nuclear researchers can still learn many lessons from the Fukushima nuclear crisis.
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Commentary on "Water and Agriculture in a Changing Africa"

Commentary / July 29, 2013

I was honored and humbled to be asked to serve as a discussant for this final leg of the Gates Symposium Series, and in particular to have the opportunity to share the discussion with John Briscoe. The goal of this series is to understand how lessons from other times and places might inform an effective and sustainable effort to eliminate food insecurity in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) – the one region in the world where widespread lack of access to sufficient food is still deeply entrenched. Moreover, this series has focused on and featured speakers with extensive on-the-ground work.

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Leading journalist comments on Pakistan's historic election

Q&A / July 25, 2013
While Pakistan’s elections and smooth democratic transition have been deemed a success, reports by some observers cited irregularities, vote rigging and intimidation. Kamal Siddiqi, a 2012 Draper Hills Summer Fellow alumni, comments on the May 2013 election and what it means for Pakistan's democratic future.
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Sejong Korean Scholars Program honors U.S. high school students

News / July 25, 2013
During the second annual Hana-Stanford Conference on Korea for U.S. Secondary School Teachers, July 29-31, 2013, Sejong Korean Scholars Program (SKSP), a distance-learning program on Korea, will honor three high school students. 27 high school students representing ten states participated in the inaugural SKSP this year. The SKSP honorees will be presenting their research essays at the conference.
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Stanford is seeking Middle East faculty

News / July 24, 2013
STANFORD UNIVERSITY invites applications for a tenure-line, open-rank position in MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES to begin in the academic year 2014-15. The scholar-teacher appointed will be based in a social science department but is also expected to make contributions to the interdisciplinary study. Click on the title above for further details. The deadline to apply is October 1, 2013.
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Smallholder irrigation a development priority in sub-Saharan Africa

News / July 24, 2013
FSE study finds smallholder irrigation in sub-Saharan Africa has great potential to reduce hunger, raise incomes, and improve development prospects. But investment is needed to better understand water resources and provide financial services to farmers.
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Stuck in the mud: Stanford’s scholarly farmer on the soggy fortunes of Midwest growers

News / July 16, 2013
FSE deputy director Walter Falcon shares field notes from his farm in Iowa a year after the region experienced its worst drought in decades. Now farmers are recovering from the wettest spring on record, eclipsing the 1892 record. "The riskiness of farming is something to see in real time; it is also very instructive to listen as farmers talk about coping with uncertainty," writes Falcon.
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