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Health economist Maria Polyakova conducts detailed analysis of the first-year impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among people based on their race and ethnicity, employment and education.

Adrienne Sabety is an assistant professor at Stanford Health Policy. Her work includes a large, 14-month study in collaboration with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in New York City targeting barriers to accessing health care for uninsured, undocumented immigrants. The Center for Innovation in Global Heath spoke with her about this work, and how undocumented immigrants—and society more broadly—benefit when access to primary, preventive care is expanded.

Research by Petra Persson and Maya Rossin-Slater on health inequality finds wealthy Black mothers and infants fare worse than the poorest white mothers and infants.

Steven Pifer and Francis Fukuyama join Michael McFaul on the World Class podcast to discuss Ukraine’s progress in the war, Crimea’s strategic importance, and the ongoing need for Western support in the conflict.

Statin-associated muscle symptoms are common and may lead to discontinuation of indicated statin therapy. So cardiologist Mark Hlatky and colleagues conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial of vitamin D supplementation.

The Suntory Foundation recognizes Tsutsui, the Henri H. and Tomoye Takahashi Professor and Senior Fellow in Japanese Studies at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, for his book 'Human Rights and the State.'

Moderated Content host Evelyn Douek discusses Twitter’s data security problems and what this says about privacy regulation more generally with Whitney Merrill, the Data Protection Officer and Privacy Counsel at Asana and long-time privacy lawyer including as an attorney at the FTC, and Riana Pfefferkorn, a Research Scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory.

Co-organized by Stanford’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and the Ban Ki-moon Foundation for a Better Future, the inaugural Trans-Pacific Sustainability Dialogue brought together a new network of social science researchers, scientists, policymakers, and practitioners from Stanford University and across the Asia-Pacific region to accelerate action on the United Nations-adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

A new article co-authored by Health Policy PhD candidate Vincent Jappah reveals that the modern drivers of child servitude in Liberia are largely social vulnerability and cultural acceptance of the practice, rather than traditional factors based on race and ethnicity.

New research shows that older men who live alone are at greater risk of managing chronic conditions and medications —a social conundrum that could lead to higher levels of cardiovascular disease.

In this National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Stanford Health Policy's David Chan and Yiqun Chen consider the productivity of emergency room physicians vs. nurse practitioners.

In political conspiracy theories, as in television shows, the plot elements are always the same. (From The Atlantic)

The NIH is funding a Stanford Medicine-led study, "Sexual harassment Training Of Principal investigators," or STOP. Through virtual, multimodal trainings that incorporate interactive gaming elements, the goal of the five-year study is to decrease sexual harassment and improve the retention of women in science.
SHP Director Douglas Owens is one of the collaborators and notes, "It's crucially important that we create inclusive, welcoming environments, especially for people training in T32 programs."

Published in the International Association of Privacy Professionals

Commentary

Renee DiResta of the Stanford Internet Observatory writes about the growing body of research suggesting human behavior on social media is strikingly similar to collective behavior in nature. Published in Noema Magazine.

Twitter’s new owner faces a difficult regulatory landscape around the world. Published in The Atlantic.

A new study by PhD student Melissa Franco finds that screening for depression via patient portals offers hope for wider detection.

Research using data from residents and staff in the California prison systems show that vaccinations offer good protection against infection with Omicron, even among patients who had previous infections.

David Studdert, a professor of health policy and professor of law, writes in this New England Journal of Medicine commentary that while clinicians face the specter of medical malpractice lawsuits, the number of paid claims against physicians has actually decreased by 75% in the past 20 years and looks at the the medical malpractice system and its impact on medical decision making.

Despite obstacles and risks, there are good reasons why South Korea should want to increase deterrence against China. In a new article, Center Fellow Oriana Skylar Mastro and co-author Sungmin Cho chart an optimal strategy for Seoul to navigate the U.S.-China rivalry and support efforts to defend Taiwan.

A research team led by Beatriz Magaloni and Melanie Morten is gathering new data on how H-2A visas impact the economic and social outcomes of families in Mexico and small farm owners in the United States.

The 2024 class of the Ford Dorsey Master’s in International Policy has arrived at Stanford eager to learn from our scholars and tackle policy challenges ranging from food security to cryptocurrency privacy.

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