Regional Expertise

Regional Expertise on display at Draper Hills event

Regional Expertise

In addition to the most pressing issues of the day, scholars at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies focus their research on many regions of the world, from Beijing to Brazil.

Research Spotlight

President Moon Jae In of South Korea during his inauguration proceedings.

South Korea's Democratic Decay

South Korea is following global trends as it slides toward a “democratic depression.” Both the spirit of democracy and actual liberal-democratic standards are under attack.
Cover of the book 'The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century"

The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century

Southeast Asian and Chinese perceptions of each other are examined using survey research and by asking whether China views the region as its “strategic backyard.”
Vincent Barletta book cover

Rhythm: Form and Dispossession

Author Vincent Barletta explores rhythm as a primordial and physical binding force that establishes order and form in the ancient world, as the anatomy of lived experience in early modern Europe, and as a subject of aesthetic and ethical questioning in the twentieth century.

Featured Faculty

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Karen Eggleston

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Karen Eggleston

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Deputy Director, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center
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Scott Rozelle

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Scott Rozelle

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Co-Director, Rural Education Action Program
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Beatriz Magaloni

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Beatriz Magaloni

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Professor of Political Science
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Yong Suk Lee

Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Yong Suk Lee

Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Deputy Director, Korea Program at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center

Upcoming Events

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Publications

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Working Papers

Chinese and Indian Engineers and their Networks in Silicon Valley

Rafiq Dossani
Shorenstein APARC, 2002 March 1, 2002

In recent years, Asian immigrants have played an important role in Silicon Valley's growth, as suppliers of both engineering and entrepreneurial talent. Given their relatively large numbers, the Indian and Chinese communities' contributions have been particularly noted.1 The Indians' presence became more marked toward the last few years of the century, bolstered by arrivals working on the Year 2000 (Y2K) problem.2 The Chinese, by contrast, had older roots set down amid long-standing political, economic, and educational links with Taiwan.

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Testimonies

U.S.-Russian Relations After September 11th

Michael McFaul, Celeste A. Wallander, Z. Blake Marshall
Sucommittee on Europe, Committee on International Relations, United States Congress, 2002 February 27, 2002

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Just about a year ago, this newly created Subcommittee opened its formal hearings with a look at the U.S.-European relationship. I said at the time I felt that the transatlantic relationship was the most important relationship this nation had. Today, in the aftermath of 911, I feel this relationship is even more important and in many respects stronger than ever.

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Policy Briefs

Weak on Warming

David G. Victor
The Washington Post, 2002 February 19, 2002

In recent years, the U.S. debate on global warming policy has been stymied by the unachievable goals of the Kyoto Protocol. Cutting U.S. emissions by one-quarter in barely a decade, as agreed at Kyoto, was never politically feasible.

Now the Bush administration, nearly a year after pulling out of the Kyoto Protocol, has finally announced its own plan for global warming. It falls far short of a grand strategy but does take a few important steps forward.

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Working Papers

People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF): Shifting Airpower Balance and Challenges to India's Security

Ramesh V. Phadke
CISAC, 2002 February 1, 2002

China is India's largest and most important neighbor, and despite recent efforts at improving relations between the two countries, the over half-century-old border dispute remains unresolved. While the prospects of a Sino-Indian border war are remote, it is essential that India understand the security implications of the rapidly modernizing Chinese military. It is in this context that this paper attempts to assess the airpower balance and the growing strength of the People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF).

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Working Papers

Okinawa's Role in the U.S.-Japan Security Arrangement

Jaques Fuqua
, 2001 December 31, 2001

This digest focuses on Okinawa's role within the larger U.S.-Japan security relationship during the second half of the twentieth century: how and why there is a strong U.S. military presence on the island, how it has become a symbol of the larger U.S.-Japan security relationship, what local issues and concerns have arisen because of U.S. military presence on the island, and what Okinawa's future prospects are in light of the U.S.-Japan security relationship.

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Books

Corporate Financing and Governance in Japan: The Road to the Future

Takeo Hoshi, Anil K. Kashyap
The MIT Press, 2001 December 31, 2001

In this book Takeo Hoshi and Anil Kashyap examine the history of the Japanese financial system, from its nineteenth-century beginnings through the collapse of the 1990s that concluded with sweeping reforms. Combining financial theory with new data and original case studies, they show why the Japanese financial system developed as it did and how its history affects its ongoing evolution.

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Books

Building a World of Liberal Democracies

Larry Diamond
Hoover Institution Press in "Foreign Policy for America's Third Century: Alternative Perspectives", Thomas Henriksen, ed., 2001 December 31, 2001

Since the disintegration of the Soviet Union, questions have arisen as to which course the United States should sail in the new international order. In this volume, some of the nation's foremost foreign policy experts present carefully crafted and bold perspectives of what America's global role should be. All contributors, leading authorities in the fields of economics, history, international relations, and political science, offer alternative viewpoints.

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Journal Articles

Measuring the Dynamic Gains from Trade

Romain Wacziarg
The World Bank Economic Review, 2001 December 31, 2001

This article investigates the links between trade policy and economic growth in a panel of 57 countries between 1970 and 1989. It develops a new measure of trade policy openness based on the policy component of trade shares, using it in a simultaneous equations system to identify the effect of trade policy on several determinants of growth.

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Books

State-Building and State Breakdown in Russia

Gail W. Lapidus, Archie Brown
Oxford University Press in "Contemporary Russian Politics: A Reader", 2001 December 31, 2001

The book chapter is a revised and updated version of "Asymmetrical Federalism and State Breakdown in Russia," which originally was published in 1999 in Post-Soviet Affairs.

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Books

Costs and Benefits of Imperfect HIV Vaccines: Implications for Vaccine Development and Use

Douglas K. Owens, D.M. Edward, Ross D. Shachter
Yale Press in "Quantitative Evaluation of HIV Prevention Programs", Kaplan EH, Brookmeyer R, eds., 2001 December 31, 2001

How successful are HIV prevention programs? Which HIV prevention programs are most cost effective? Which programs are worth expanding and which should be abandoned altogether? This book addresses the quantitative evaluation of HIV prevention programs, assessing for the first time several different quantitative methods of evaluation.

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Books

Belarus and the Flight from Sovereignty

Coit D. Blacker, Condoleezza Rice, Stephen D. Krasner
Columbia University Press in "Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities", 2001 December 31, 2001

Some of the most pressing issues in the contemporary international order revolve around a frequently invoked but highly contested concept: sovereignty. To what extent does the concept of sovereignty -as it plays out in institutional arrangements, rules, and principles -inhibit the solution of these issues? Can the rules of sovereignty be bent? Can they be ignored? Do they represent an insurmountable barrier to stable solutions or can alternative arrangements be created?

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Working Papers

Potential Sources of Financing for U.S. Ventures in Russia

Askar Askarov, Katharine Reed
CISAC, 2001 December 1, 2001

Following the end of the Cold War, the United States and its allies recognized that it was in their vital security interests to promote stable transitions in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the New Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union. For the most part, such transitions would depend on the efforts of the states in transition themselves, including many that had been newly formed. However, one way in which the Western nations could help was by economic assistance -- both financial and technical.

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Books

Anatomy of an Earthquake: How the KMT Lost and the DPP Won the 2000 Presidential Election

Larry Diamond
M.E. Sharpe in "Taiwan's Presidential Politics: Democratization and Cross-Strait Relations in the 21st Century", Muthiah Alagappa, ed., 2001 November 1, 2001

The March 2000 presidential election was an important milestone in the democratic development of Taiwan, with the Kuomintang turned out of power after five decades of control and replaced by the Democratic Progressive Party.

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Commentary

Patriot Act--A Remedy for an Unidentified Problem

Laura K. Donohue, Jim Walsh
San Francisco Chronicle, 2001 October 31, 2001

President Bush signed the Patriot Act last week. The new anti-terrorism law has its critics. Some object to the law's intrusions on civil liberties. They cite the provisions for extended detention, new powers to spy on Americans, a lack of controls on use of information, a greater ability to freeze and seize assets and an overly broad definition of domestic terrorism.

Others express concern about the process. The Patriot Act represents the most radical change in police powers in decades, and codifies counterterrorist measures previously rejected by Congress as too intrusive.

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Journal Articles

Strengthening Nuclear Security against Terrorists and Thieves Through Better Training

George Bunn, Fritz Steinhausler, Lyudmila Zaitseva
The Nonproliferation Review, 2001 October 1, 2001

The September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon have shown that well-organized global terriorist groups bent on causing mass murder and destruction are no longer hypothetical. There can now be little doubt that if such terrorists could acquire weapons-usable nuclear materials across a city, they would likely attempt that as well. Under these circumstances, measures to further strengthen the protection of nuclear materials and muclear installations are urgently needed.

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Journal Articles

Organized Hypocrisy in nineteenth-century East Asia

Stephen Krasner
International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, 2001 August 1, 2001

Every international system or society has a set of rules or norms that define appropriate behaviors. These norms are, however, never obeyed in an automatic fashion. Perhaps more than any other setting the international environment is characterized by organized hypocrisy. Actors violate rules in practice without at the same time challenging their legitimacy. In nineteenth-century East Asia this was true for countries embracing the European sovereign state system of formal equality and autonomy, and the Sinocentric Confucian system of hierarchy and dependency.

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Journal Articles

Abiding Sovereignty

Stephen Krasner
International Political Science Review, 2001 July 1, 2001

Over the several hundred years during which the rules of sovereignty including non-intervention and the exclusion of external authority have been widely understood, state control could never be taken for granted. States could never isolate themselves from the external environment. Globalization and intrusive international norms are old, not new, phenomena. Some aspects of the contemporary environment are uniquethe number of transnational nongovernmental organizations has grown dramatically, international organizations are more prominent; cyber crime could not exist without cyber space.

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Journal Articles

Biological Terrorism and Public Health

Christopher F. Chyba
Survival, 2001 April 1, 2001

A biological terrorist attack probably would first be detected by doctors or other health-care workers. The speed of a response would then depend on their rapid recognition and communication that certain illnesses appeared out of the ordinary. For this reason, preparing for biological terrorism has more in common with confronting the threat of emerging infectious diseases than with preparing for chemical or nuclear attacks. Defense against bioterrorism, like protection against emerging diseases, must therefore rely on improved national and international public-health surveillance.

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Policy Briefs

Verifying the Agreed Framework

Michael M. May, Chaim Braun, George Bunn, Zachary Davis, James Hassberger, Ronald Lehman, Wayne Ruhter, William Sailor, Robert Schock, Nancy Suski
Center for Global Security Research; CISAC, 2001 April 1, 2001

A joint Stanford University-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory team of scientists, nuclear engineers and arms control experts has concluded in a new study that North Korea's compliance with the 1994 Agreed Framework can be verified to a satisfactory degree of accuracy. Special effort, however, will be needed from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), as well as support from the US, the Republic of Korea (ROK), Japan and perhaps other countries. Most importantly, cooperation and openness from North Korea are essential.

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Journal Articles

Think Again: Sovereignty

Stephen Krasner
Foreign Policy, 2001 January 1, 2001

Full article available with subscription.

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Working Papers

Foreign Direct Investment in New Electricity Generating Capacity in Developing Asia: Stakeholders, Risks, and the Search for a New Paradigm

Robert Thomas Crow
Shorenstein APARC, 2001 January 1, 2001

The rate of investment sufficient to provide developing Asia with a reasonably adequate supply of electricity is immense, ranging from a World Bank estimate of 2000 megawatts (MW) each month (which translates into an annual investment of about $35 billion per year) to even higher estimates. All of the larger countries of developing Asia have been looking for foreign direct investment (FDI) to provide a significant amount of the needed capital.

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Books

Managing the Pentagon's International Relations

Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, Christiana Briggs, Anja Manuel
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, 2000 December 31, 2000

Book abstract:

This book addresses the organization and management of the national security establishment, and especially the Department of Defense, to implement the policies the nation's leaders choose for it, to manage the programs they direct, and to adapt to a changing world.

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Books

Reflections on Education as Transcendence

John Meyer
Stanford University Press, in "Reconstructing the Common Good in Education", 2000 December 31, 2000

For almost two centuries, Americans expected that their public schools would cultivate the personal, moral, and social development of individual students, create citizens, and bind diverse groups into one nation. Since the 1980s, however, a new generation of school reformers has been intent on using schools to solve the nations economic problems. An economic justification for public schoolsequipping students with marketable skills to help the nation compete in a global, information-based workplaceoverwhelmed other historically accepted purposes for tax-supported public schools.

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