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The seventh issue features four peer-reviewed articles and four commentaries

A failure by the United States to continue military aid to Ukraine would put that country in the gravest peril and embolden Russia to launch more aggression against other European countries, Ukrainian leaders said last week during a discussion hosted by the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law.

How do democracies arise, and what conditions promote their survival? In a CDDRL seminar series talk, Professor of Political Science and Classics Josiah Ober addressed this question, drawing on his latest book, “The Civic Bargain: How Democracy Survives” (Princeton University Press), co-authored with Brook Manville.

During her tenure at Stanford, Dr. Richardson will embark on individual research endeavors while focusing on completing her forthcoming book project, titled "Great Changes Unseen in a Century: How to Save Democracy and Human Rights from Xi Jinping."

Open for enrollment now through Stanford Continuing Studies, "Modern Israel: Insights and Analysis from Stanford Scholars and Guests" will run online for ten weeks on Wednesdays, from April 3 through June 5.

Scholars from the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies share their memories and perspectives of Navalny, who died while incarcerated in a Russian penal colony.

Stanford Associate Professor of Political Science Vicky Fouka shares her research on how public recognition of collective culpability has affected German national identity.

A number of factors have led to political parties getting weaker. Stanford political scientist Didi Kuo explains why and what implications this could have for 2024 and beyond.

Michelle Mello and colleagues argue that state legal reforms have exacerbated rather than improved weaknesses in U.S. emergency powers revealed by COVID-19, jeopardizing future responses.

In a new interview, Southeast Asia Program Director Donald K. Emmerson discusses the history and politics that have shaped great power competition in Southeast Asia and how the intensifying rivalry between China and the United States might affect ASEAN member states.

The launch events hosted by CDDRL's new research initiative invited undergraduates, graduate associates, and members of the public to discuss the future of multiracial democracy.

In her testimony before the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, Mello emphasized the need for federal guardrails and standards regarding the use of artificial intelligence in health care.

During a visit to the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Slovak President Zuzana Čaputová reminded the Stanford community that the stakes of the war in Ukraine are high and will impact democracies far beyond Eastern and Central Europe.

In a webinar for the Stanford community, an expert on Jewish-Arab relations in Israel shared what he and other scholars have found works – and doesn’t – in advancing peace between the two communities.

Miriam Golden argues that a decline in patronage appointments to state bureaucracies due to civil service legislation increased reelection rates in state legislatures.

Learning how to handle conflict, says Michele Gelfand, “is just as important as any medical training.”

During the 2024 Payne Distinguished Lecture Series presentation, Kumi Naidoo highlighted how creative storytelling blended with scientific evidence can inspire profound human change and move societies toward longer-term solutions for climate change, economic deprivation, social injustice, and war.

The Academy Award-winning actor and filmmaker visited Stanford to screen and discuss his documentary, Superpower, about Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and his country’s war with Russia.

Professor Tal’s expertise in sustainability and public policy will offer students valuable insight into the intersection of climate change issues and politics in the Middle East.

Professor of Political Science Pauline Jones explored how Russia’s renewed aggression in Ukraine will affect Moscow’s relations with its Eurasian neighbors in a recent REDS Seminar talk, co-sponsored by CDDRL and TEC.