Regional Expertise

Regional Expertise on display at Draper Hills event

Regional Expertise

In addition to the most pressing issues of the day, scholars at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies focus their research on many regions of the world, from Beijing to Brazil.

Research Spotlight

President Moon Jae In of South Korea during his inauguration proceedings.

South Korea's Democratic Decay

South Korea is following global trends as it slides toward a “democratic depression.” Both the spirit of democracy and actual liberal-democratic standards are under attack.
Cover of the book 'The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century"

The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century

Southeast Asian and Chinese perceptions of each other are examined using survey research and by asking whether China views the region as its “strategic backyard.”
Vincent Barletta book cover

Rhythm: Form and Dispossession

Author Vincent Barletta explores rhythm as a primordial and physical binding force that establishes order and form in the ancient world, as the anatomy of lived experience in early modern Europe, and as a subject of aesthetic and ethical questioning in the twentieth century.

Featured Faculty

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Karen Eggleston

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Karen Eggleston

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Deputy Director, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center
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Scott Rozelle

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Scott Rozelle

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Co-Director, Rural Education Action Program
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Beatriz Magaloni

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Beatriz Magaloni

Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Professor of Political Science
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Yong Suk Lee

Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Yong Suk Lee

Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Deputy Director, Korea Program at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center

Upcoming Events

See all upcoming events related to our regional expertise.

Publications

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Books

How Can Trade Improve Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa?

Kym Anderson
Center on Food Security and the Environment, 2013 January 23, 2013

For decades, earnings from farming in many developing countries, including in Sub-Saharan Africa, have been depressed by a pro-urban and anti-trade bias in own-country policies, as well as by governments of richer countries favoring their farmers with import barriers and subsidies. Both sets of policies reduced global economic welfare and agricultural trade, and almost certainly added to global inequality and poverty and to food insecurity in many low-income countries.

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Working Papers

The Crumbling Edifice of Prohibition and Proposals for Reform: The case of Guatemala

Amanda Fielding
2013 January 1, 2013

Abstract:

The purpose of this text is to present the proposals of drug policy reform elaborated by the Beckley Foundation for the Government of Guatemala, as part of the agreement set between these two bodies. Amanda Feilding was invited by President Otto Pérez Molina to establish a Beckley Foundation Latin American Chapter in Guatemala in July 2012, and was requested to produce a rigorous, evidence-based analysis of the impact of current prohibitionist drug policies on Guatemala and the wider region.

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Journal Articles

Global Impact of Antiretroviral Therapy-Associated Diarrhea

Rajesh Gupta, Roxana M. Ordonez, Serena Koenig
AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 2012 December 31, 2012
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Journal Articles

HIV Development Assistance and Adult Mortality in Africa

Eran Bendavid, Charles Holmes, Jay Bhattacharya, Grant Miller
Journal of the American Medical Association, 2012 December 31, 2012

Context  The effect of global health initiatives on population health is uncertain. Between 2003 and 2008, the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the largest initiative ever devoted to a single disease, operated intensively in 12 African focus countries. The initiative's effect on all-cause adult mortality is unknown.

Objective  To determine whether PEPFAR was associated with relative changes in adult mortality in the countries and districts where it operated most intensively.

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Working Papers

Comparative analysis of data frameworks for agricultural policy analysis: The WTO-notificaitons and the OECD's PSE database

Klaus Mittenzwei, Timothy Josling
Norwegian Agriultural Economics Research Institute, 2012 December 31, 2012

The OECD and the WTO have accumulated systematic data on the magnitude of support going to farmers as a result of farm policies. The datasets are collected for different purposes, but give a detailed picture of the evolution of these policies. This paper extends recent work on the compatibility of these two classification systems with a focus on Norway, Switzerland, the US and the EU. The results show how the OECD data set, particularly with respect to the link between direct payments and production requirements, complements that of the WTO.

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Books

Knowledge Perspectives of New Product Development: A Comparative Approach

Dimitris G. Assimakopoulos, Elias G. Carayannis, Rafiq Dossani
Springer, 2012 December 31, 2012

New product and service development is the lifeblood of any enterprise. Beyond the obvious need for organizations to innovate in order to compete, embedded in any new product development (NPD) program are knowledge, technological expertise, and the social networks that convert these capabilities into marketable offerings. Recent research has focused on the NPD as dynamic and iterative, as opposed to linear. The pressure to reduce costs is forcing many companies to outsource operations.

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Journal Articles

Public Diplomacy 2.0

Lina Khatib, William Dutton, Michael Thelwall
Middle East Journal, 2012 December 31, 2012
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Working Papers

South Korea and the Global Economy in Transition

Gi-Wook Shin, Byongwon Bahk, Taeho Bark, Thomas F. Cargill, Joon Nak Choi, Eun Mee Kim, Ji Hyun Kim
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, 2012 December 31, 2012

These working papers on the South Korean economy are the product of an annual conference series on Korean affairs hosted by Stanford University's Korean Studies Program (KSP), and made possible by the generous support of the Koret Foundation. KSP's 2009–2010 Koret Fellow, Byongwon Bahk, a former vice finance minister and chief economic adviser to Korean president Lee Myung-bak, played a leading role in organizing the 2010 conference, authored a major paper, and co-edited this volume.

From Byongwon Bahk's preface:

The editors believe that the study of the South Korean economy holds, or should hold, interest not only for Koreans but also for Americans and the international community as a whole. Korea has become a major player in the global economy, ranking thirteenth in GDP and seventh in exports among the world's nearly 200 countries. This should no longer come as much of a surprise to consumers across the globe who use Korean cell phones, drive Korean cars, and, increasingly, enjoy Korean pop music and movies.

The Korean economy is also important as a leading model of development. In only two generations and despite national division and the devastation of civil war, South Korea has transformed itself from a largely agricultural economy to a world leader in manufacturing, which in turn facilitated its emergence as a dynamic democracy. The Korean experience holds many lessons for countries throughout the world as they also struggle to modernize in a highly competitive, globalized economy.

Korea's success in navigating the turmoil caused by the global financial crisis and recession of 2008–2009 is yet another reason for studying its economy. Despite its economy being an astounding 85 percent dependent on international trade, Korea has been among the world's leaders in recovering from the crisis. Korea owes that success in part to the very hard lessons it learned from the Asian financial crisis of 1997–1998.

The five chapters selected for this compendium focus on some of the timeliest and most important issues involving the Korean economy.

Papers included in this volume:

  1. "The Changing Global and Korean Economies" by Taeho Bark
  2. "An Odyssey of the Korean Financial System and the September 2008 Financial Shock" by Thomas F. Cargill
  3. "South Korea’s Official Development Assistance Policy Under Lee Myung-bak: Humanitarian or National Interest?" by Eun Mee Kim and Ji Hyun Kim
  4. "Policy Recommendations for the Korean Economy" by Byongwon Bahk
  5. "Economic Globalization and Expatriate Labor in Korea" by Gi-Wook Shin and Joon Nak Choi
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Commentary

Transportation SNAFU Administration

Amy Zegart
Foreign Policy, 2012 December 19, 2012

Foreign Policy blogger and CISAC Faculty Member Amy Zegart explains the good, the bad, and the ugly of aviation security. She notes that the increased use of bomb-sniffing dogs and LAX's ARMOR program, which uses an algorithm to conduct random times and locations for searches, are two examples of positive developments in the TSA's airline security measures. 

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Commentary

Spooks, Incorporated

Amy Zegart
Foreign Policy, 2012 December 5, 2012

Foreign Policy blogger and CISAC Faculty Member Amy Zegart explains how major private companies are increasingly developing their own intelligence that conduct surveillance and analyze information that places the reputation, personnel or business interests of their company. These units look and act like government intelligence agencies, and are staffed with former CIA, FBI, and military professionals that maintain their government ties. Companies operating globally cannot afford to ignore political events, natural disasters, and other risks. 

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Commentary

Focus on Officers, Not the Media

Amy Zegart
The New York Times, 2012 December 3, 2012

CISAC Faculty Member Amy Zegart explains the politics behind leading the CIA: winning trust and support within the organization and with outsiders. David Petraeus excelled at maintaining outside support for the CIA, but could not win over the intelligence community. 

Thee next CIA director will need to address major problems such as the military's increasing influence over the "spying business" and the agency's role in the tactical operations, all while the DoD increases its own intelligence activity.  

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Working Papers

Remittances, Informal Loans, and Assets as Risk-Coping Mechanisms: Evidence from Agricultural Households in Rural Philippines

Marjorie C. Pajaron
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 32, 2012 November 30, 2012

This paper investigates whether agricultural households in the rural Philippines insure their consumption against income shocks and whether they use migration, remittances, informal loans, or assets as ex post risk-coping mechanisms. Since these households have limited access to formal insurance and credit markets, any shocks to their volatile income can have substantial impacts. Using panel data, and rainfall shocks as the instrumental variable for income shocks, this paper finds little evidence of effective risk-sharing within the networks of family and friends.

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Commentary

King David

Amy Zegart
Foreign Policy, 2012 November 21, 2012

In this blog post for Foreign Policy, Zegart discusses how the military's organizational and operational culture clashes with that of intelligence agencies. When military leaders are tasked with running an intelligence agency, three distinct concerns arise. The first is that a military leader will focus on short-term tactical operations over long-term strategic assessments. Military leaders are also accustomed to a hierarchical structure where orders from leaders are rarely questioned-- this clashes directly with the CIA's analytical culture.

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Commentary

Reaction Time

Martha Crenshaw
Foreign Policy, 2012 November 12, 2012

In this post for Foreign Policy, Martha Crenshaw outlines the difficulties that U.S. presidents have had in forming and maintaining a counterterrorism strategy. From Jimmy Carter to Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama, all have had their foreign policy reputations tarnished by terrorism. The challenge is in forming a consistent, logical counterterrorism policy.

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Journal Articles

After Obama's Victory at the U.S. Presidential Elections 2012: What Are the Perspectives? An Analysis from a European View

Prof. Dr. Raimund Krämer, Prof. Dr. Lutz Kleinwächer, Prof. Dr. Andrzey Sakson, Roland Benedikter
WeltTrends, 2012 November 1, 2012
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Commentary

Failing History

Amy Zegart
Foreign Policy, 2012 October 10, 2012

CISAC Faculty Member Amy Zegart outlines how the CIA's mindset has not changed since the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962. Fifty years since the crisis, the CIA and other intelligence agencies still operate in an organizational and psychological mindset that favors consensus and consistency. Zegart argues that these "invisible pressures" led to intelligence failures in Cuba in 1962 and Iraq in 2002, where dissenting opinions or internal disagreements were downplayed.

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Commentary

Torture Creep

Amy Zegart
Foreign Policy, 2012 September 25, 2012

According to Amy Zegart, CISAC faculty member, Americans have become more hawkish on counterterrorism policy since Barack Obama took office. In a blog post for Foreign Policy, Zegart conducted an online poll and found that 25 percent of Americans would stop a terrorist attack by using a nuclear weapon. Support for harsh interrogation techniques and assassination have also increased since similar polls were conducted in 2005 and 2007.

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Books

Will Threats Deter Nuclear Terrorism?

Martha Crenshaw
Stanford Security Studies, 2012 September 19, 2012

Book description:

During the Cold War, deterrence theory was the cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, however, popular wisdom dictated that terrorist organizations and radical fanatics could not be deterred—and governments shifted their attention to combating terrorism rather than deterring it.

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Commentary

The Debt Crisis Consummates the End of the European Nation States

Roland Benedikter
Financial Times Germany, 2012 September 18, 2012

The debt crisis is clear: Smaller areas can be managed better than large nations. Therefore they should be autonomous - under the umbrella of the European Union.

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Journal Articles

Making China's Nuclear War Plan

John W. Lewis, Xue Litai
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 2012 September 1, 2012
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