Rose Gottemoeller

Rose Gottemoeller

  • Steven C. Házy Lecturer at the Center for International Security and Cooperation
  • Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution

Center for International Security and Cooperation
Encina Hall
616 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-6165

Biography

Rose Gottemoeller is the Steven C. Házy Lecturer at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and its Center for International Security and Cooperation.

Before joining Stanford Gottemoeller was the Deputy Secretary General of NATO from 2016 to 2019, where she helped to drive forward NATO’s adaptation to new security challenges in Europe and in the fight against terrorism.  Prior to NATO, she served for nearly five years as the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security at the U.S. Department of State, advising the Secretary of State on arms control, nonproliferation and political-military affairs. While Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance in 2009 and 2010, she was the chief U.S. negotiator of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) with the Russian Federation.

Prior to her government service, she was a senior associate with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, with joint appointments to the Nonproliferation and Russia programs. She served as the Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center from 2006 to 2008, and is currently a nonresident fellow in Carnegie's Nuclear Policy Program. She is also a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. 

At Stanford, Gottemoeller teaches and mentors students in the Ford Dorsey Master’s in International Policy program and the CISAC Honors program; contributes to policy research and outreach activities; and convenes workshops, seminars and other events relating to her areas of expertise, including nuclear security, Russian relations, the NATO alliance, EU cooperation and non-proliferation. 

publications

Journal Articles
October 2021

The Standstill Conundrum: The Advent of Second-Strike Vulnerability and Options to Address It

Author(s)
The Standstill Conundrum: The Advent of Second-Strike Vulnerability and Options to Address It
Journal Articles
May 2020

U.S.-Russian Nuclear Arms Control Negotiations—A Short History

Author(s)
U.S.-Russian Nuclear Arms Control Negotiations—A Short History
Journal Articles
September 2020

Rethinking Nuclear Arms Control

Author(s)
Rethinking Nuclear Arms Control

In The News

Gorbachev & Reagan
Commentary

Memories of Mikhail Gorbachev - and a unique time in Russian history

So many wonderful things have been said of Mikhail Sergeevich Gorbachev in recent days that I am loath simply to repeat them. Instead, I have reached back for my own memories, those that brought home to me his unique place in Russian history.
Memories of Mikhail Gorbachev - and a unique time in Russian history
Nuclear weapon test Bravo (yield 15 Mt) on Bikini Atoll
Commentary

A current security imperative: the US role in the Marshall Islands

Rose Gottemoeller, former undersecretary of state for arms control and international security, remembers the painful history of Castle Bravo—the largest and most catastrophic US nuclear weapons test conducted in the Marshall Islands during the Cold War—and urges the United States to finish the compact extension with the three island nations to contain China’s growing influence in the Pacific.
A current security imperative: the US role in the Marshall Islands
Vladimir Putin
Commentary

What’s eating Putin?

As horrific and needless violence unfolds in Ukraine, my friends, family, colleagues, and media from around the world have all been asking the same questions: What’s eating Putin? What has driven him to start the largest war in Europe since World War II? My answer has been: It’s complicated. And, as I see it, at least eight different factors account for Putin’s erratic and dangerous behavior.
What’s eating Putin?
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