News

Afghani women protest

FSI Newsroom

FSI scholars offer expert analysis and commentary on contemporary global issues.

FEATURED NEWS

Protests demonstrate against Vladimir Putin outside a Russian-owned international investment bank in Budapest, Hungary.

President Zelenskyy Speaks to Stanford Students in Special Video Address

Lyubov Sobol, an activist and visiting scholar at CDDRL, explains why the success of Russia's pro-democracy movement is important for geopolitical stability.
The Supreme Court

Protecting Reproductive Health Information Health Information Post-Roe v. Wade

Michelle Mello warns that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and end federal protections for abortion could also expose women's' personal health data in court.
Shinzo Abe speaking from a lectern

Reflections on the Assassination of Former Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe

Abe was one of the most transformative political leaders in modern Japanese history, and his passing will unquestionably shake-up Japanese politics, says Kiyoteru Tsutsui

News

Filter:

Filter results Close
Ex: author name, topic, etc.
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded

Japan-Korea Relations: Time for U.S. Intervention?

Commentary / January 7, 2014
Daniel Sneider writes that relations between South Korea and Japan have noticeably deteriorated in the past few months. Sneider suggests a more active U.S. mediation role, such as appointing a special envoy or negotiating reparations, may better encourage reconciliation and normalization of relations.
Show body Show body

Challenges in 2014: peace and security issues in Northeast Asia

News / January 2, 2014
In an interview with the Korean media, Gi-Wook Shin, director of Shorenstein APARC, and Kathleen Stephens, 2013-14 Koret Fellow, emphasize the increased role of the United States in peace and security issues in Northeast Asia, and suggest Park administration implement its "Peace Process" through humanitarian projects engaging North-South Korean cooperation.
Show body Show body

North Korea's strange, bloody mistake

Commentary / December 20, 2013
Gi-Wook Shin and David Straub analyze North Korea’s execution of Jang Song-taek and its implications on nuclear negotiation channels. They point out how Kim Jong Un’s leadership purge may prompt China to align more closely with the U.S. and South Korea on their likely push for heightened sanctions in the coming months.
Show body Show body

New paper examines democratic development in Africa

News / December 19, 2013
In a new CDDRL working paper, Banting Post-Doctoral Fellow Landry Signé examines political regime changes in Africa to assess why democratic development occurs in some states, while others remain authoritarian. Signé’s findings reveal that foreign intervention and economic conditions are important determinants of democratization in the post-Cold War era.
Show body Show body

Stanford scholars introduce new measure of state power

News / December 19, 2013
A new working paper released by Stanford political science doctoral candidates Melissa Lee and Nan Zhang disentangles rival theories of civil conflict by introducing a new way to measure the concept of state presence over people and territory. The authors argue that their new approach provides a better measure of the extent to which state institutions, agents and rules influence the decision-making of citizens.
Show body Show body

Elimination of Jang Song-taek contradicts usual narrative in North Korea

Commentary / December 19, 2013
In this op-ed, Gi-Wook Shin and David Straub discuss North Korea’s puzzling execution of Jang Song-taek and the social, economic, and political problems facing Kim Jong Un’s regime. They suggest that Jang’s execution may be an attempt to consolidate power and to shore-up support within the country. Shin and Straub point out that the revelations made to justify the purge and execution also act to delegitimize the regime by sending confused signals to the international community, in particular to China and South Korea over their recent economic engagement. They propose that the U.S., South Korea, and China may be able to use this as an opportunity to influence Kim and convince him to relinquish North Korea’s nuclear stockpile, among other goals.
Show body Show body

Unlocking Big Data: Search, Social, Mobile

News / December 18, 2013
A group of data scientists from Baidu, Foursquare, and LinkedIn engaged in a wide-ranging discussion at the annual China 2.0 conference. Moderated by Susan Athey, Professor of Economics at Stanford Graduate School of Business, the conversation spanned the three-waves of Big Data: search, social, and mobile.
Show body

REAP Research Highlighted in CNN Article - Mind the Gap: China's Great Education Divide

News / December 17, 2013
Once again, 15-year-olds in Shanghai have scored at the top of the PISA global education assessment, ranking number one in the world in reading, math and science -- but is it the same across China? CNN cites data from REAP to paint a stark picture of how Shanghai's education success is not repeated in China's less wealthy, rural interior.
Show body Show body

CHP/PCOR’s three new faculty members bring a varied background in behavioral health economics, law and children’s health outcomes

News / December 16, 2013
Three researchers, whose work spans the globe as well as disciplines, have joined CHP/PCOR. They include a health law professor, a physician economist interested in how behavioral issues influence patient outcomes, and another physician economist who will focus on health economic issues among children in developing countries.
Show body

Suspicion and mutual distrust may threaten U.S.-China relationship

News / December 16, 2013
Thomas Fingar and former CISAC Visiting Scholar Fan Jishe write that the U.S.-China relationship is stronger and more interdependent than ever, but mutual suspicion and distrust persists. They argue that four decades of stability have taught Beijing and Washington how to manage their relationship.
Show body Show body

Caixin Column 4: Behind Before They Start - The Preschool Years (Part 2)

News / December 16, 2013
REAP co-director Scott Rozelle builds on a ten-part series for Caixin Magazine titled, "Inequality 2030: Glimmering Hope in China in a Future Facing Extreme Despair." In his fourth column, Rozelle explains what can be done to help increase rural kids' educational readiness.
Show body Show body

Climate Change Threatens Food Security, Warns FSE Director

News / December 13, 2013
Director Roz Naylor spoke to the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting, attended by Governor Jerry Brown, on how climate change affects crop yields and food prices.
Show body Show body

Child health in Kenya improves with access to clean water

News / December 13, 2013

Children in rural Kenya are more susceptible to disease and death the farther away they live from clean drinking water, according to Stanford researchers.

Show body Show body

Award-winning social entrepreneurs to join Stanford this winter

News / December 13, 2013
CDDRL's Program on Social Entrepreneurship is proud to introduce its fourth class of Social Entrepreneurs-in-Residence at Stanford who will be joining the academic community in January. Tackling complex social justice issues in the Bay Area and globally, this group is working to raise literacy rates in public schools, hold international institutions accountable for their abuses, and defend the rights of women and girls across the state of California.
Show body

FSI scholar weighs in on political protests in Kiev

News / December 12, 2013
In an interview on KQED’s Forum, FSI’s Kathryn Stoner analyzes the political turmoil surrounding President Viktor Yanukovych’s refusal to sign an economic agreement with the European Union. Stoner, a senior fellow at FSI and director of the Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies, discusses what led to the protests in Kiev and the split between the country’s pro-Russian and Western-leaning factions.
Show body

SCPKU's new immersive classrooms connect Stanford globally

News / December 10, 2013
In collaboration with Stanford's Graduate School of Business, SCPKU has unveiled two new immersive classrooms at the center which enrich the overall student experience and increase Stanford's online and distance education's impact.
Show body Show body

Shorenstein APARC releases Annual Center Overview for 2012-13

News / December 9, 2013
As we begin year 2014, Shorenstein APARC looks back at highlights from the 2012-13 academic year. The latest edition of the Center overview, entitled "Engaging Asia," includes special research, people, events, and outreach features, and is now available for download online.
Show body Show body

Detention and release of Palo Alto retiree by North Korea prompts media interest – APARC scholars offer expertise

News / December 7, 2013
APARC's Daniel Sneider and David Straub closely followed the case of Merrill Newman, the Palo Alto grandfather detained and eventually released by North Korea. In several media interviews, the Korea experts offered their insights.
Show body Show body

South Korea has made huge strides by focusing on middle of fuel cycle

News / December 5, 2013
A team of CISAC researchers, led by Senior Fellow Siegfried Hecker, advises South Korea on how to keep its nuclear energy program robust and safe.
Show body Show body

Perry honored by Department of Defense for national security work

News / December 4, 2013
Former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry was conferred the Medal for Distinguished Public Service (Silver Palm) in recognition of his groundbreaking work in national and international security issues.
Show body Show body

Pages