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Sherri Rose

AI algorithms often are trained on adult data, which can skew results when evaluating children. A new perspective piece by SHP's Sherri Rose and several Stanford Medicine colleagues lays out an approach for pediatric populations.

Rose was recognized for treating diversity and inclusion as investments in Stanford’s future and conducting research that exposes how medical and health policy decision have the power to exacerbate disadvantage and equity.

The School of Medicine's AHEaD program provides training and experience in population health research for college students who are from underrepresented and historically excluded groups in the health sciences. This summer's co-director Sherri Rose, an associate professor of health policy, says the program is intended to empower students from underrepresented populations.

The five year, $5.5 million award will be used by Rose — an associate professor of health policy — to develop a framework to investigate the social impacts of algorithms on health care.

Sherri Rose illustrates ways to improve payments to health-care plans, making them more efficiently and fairly distributed.

It's the second recognition this year for Sherri Rose, whose work is making significant contributions to health statistics.

The award recognizes a statistician in early to mid-career who has made significant contributions to one or more of the areas of applied statistics in which Gertrude Cox worked: survey methodology, experimental design, biostatistics, and statistical computing.

Sherri Rose comes to us from Harvard Medical School, where she co-founded the Health Policy Data Science lab.