Uncommon Yet Consequential Online Harms: A discussion with authors from a special issue of the Journal of Online Trust & Safety

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Come join The Journal of Online Trust & Safety, an open access journal for cutting-edge trust and safety scholarship, as we bring together authors published in our special issue, Uncommon yet Consequential Online Harms, for a webinar, hosted on September 1, 9:30-10:30am PT. 

The Journal of Online Trust & Safety publishes research from computer science, sociology, political science, law, and more. Journal articles have been covered in The Guardian, The Washington Post, and Platformer and cited in Senate testimony and a platform policy announcement.

Articles in this special issue will include: 

Election Fraud, YouTube, and Public Perception of the Legitimacy of President Biden by James Bisbee, Megan A. Brown, Angela Lai, Richard Bonneau, Joshua A. Tucker, and Jonathan Nagler

Predictors of Radical Intentions among Incels: A Survey of 54 Self-identified Incels by Sophia Moskalenko, Naama Kates, Juncal Fernández-Garayzábal González, and Mia Bloom

Procedural Justice and Self Governance on Twitter: Unpacking the Experience of Rule Breaking on Twitter by Matthew Katsaros, Tom Tyler, Jisu Kim, and Tracey Meares

Twitter’s Disputed Tags May Be Ineffective at Reducing Belief in Fake News and Only Reduce Intentions to Share Fake News Among Democrats and Independents by Jeffrey Lees, Abigail McCarter, and Dawn M. Sarno

To hear from the authors about their new research, please register for the webinar. To be notified about journal updates, please sign up for Stanford Internet Observatory announcements and follow @journalsafetech. Questions about the journal can be sent to trustandsafetyjournal@stanford.edu.

 

 

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