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Health and Medicine

Health and Medicine

FSI’s researchers assess health and medicine through the lenses of economics, nutrition and politics. They’re studying and influencing public health policies of local and national governments and the roles that corporations and nongovernmental organizations play in providing health care around the world. Scholars look at how governance affects citizens’ health, how children’s health care access affects the aging process and how to improve children’s health in Guatemala and rural China. They want to know what it will take for people to cook more safely and breathe more easily in developing countries.

FSI professors investigate how lifestyles affect health. What good does gardening do for older Americans? What are the benefits of eating organic food or growing genetically modified rice in China? They study cost-effectiveness by examining programs like those aimed at preventing the spread of tuberculosis in Russian prisons. Policies that impact obesity and undernutrition are examined; as are the public health implications of limiting salt in processed foods and the role of smoking among men who work in Chinese factories. FSI health research looks at sweeping domestic policies like the Affordable Care Act and the role of foreign aid in affecting the price of HIV drugs in Africa.

Recent News

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Shorenstein APARC Names 2019-20 Postdoctoral Fellows

February 2019

Shorenstein APARC is pleased to announce the selection of two scholars as postdoctoral fellows for the 2019-20 academic year.

A student reflects on matrix multiplication

November 2018

A matrix with m rows and n columns looks like a rectangle filled with tiny boxes: m times n boxes, to be exact.

Facing the Demographic Tidal Wave: Collaborative Solutions for an Aging World

October 2018

In Beijing’s bustling Chaoyang District stands a multi-story building known as the Gonghe Senior Apartments: a 400-bed nursing home for middle-income seniors who are disabled or suffer from...

Subsidizing private insurance plans to provide Medicare and Medicaid benefits. Is it working?

October 2018

U.S. social insurance programs traditionally have been paid out to beneficiaries directly by the federal government.

Poisonous Pandas: New Book Unravels the Proliferation of Cigarette Consumption and Production

September 2018

*/ A common mythology is that cigarette smoking is yesterday’s problem.

Marshall Burke Interview: "The Future of Everything with Russ Altman"

September 2018

Marshall Burke, assistnat professor of Earth system science and deptuy director at the Center on Food Security and the Enviroment shares his insights on how climate change is already impacting...

Indirect child casualties of conflict far outnumber direct combatant deaths in Africa

August 2018

More children die from the indirect impact of armed conflict in Africa than those killed in the crossfire and on the battlefields, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Global health for global classrooms

August 2018

“Super Science High School” (SSH) and “Super Global High School” (SGH) are designations awarded by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) to upper...

Saving the world’s food and water supplies with Ertharin Cousin

August 2018

The Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University is pleased to announce that former U.S.

Podcast: Matthew Kohrman on China’s Tobacco Industry

August 2018

Tune in to SupChina Sinica Podcast with Matthew Kohrman about his book Poisonous Pandas: Chinese Cigarette Manufacturing in Critical Historical Perspectives.Listen on the SupChina's website.

Legal US immigrants may be scared to sign up for benefits

August 2018

The Trump administration's immigration crackdown may be leading to an unintended consequence: a drop-off in benefits enrollment among legal Hispanic immigrants, according to new research by...

A better way to measure progress toward the UN Sustainable Development Goals

July 2018

A new calculation that combines health and economic well-being at the population level could help to better measure progress toward the U.N.

Stanford researchers find warming temperatures could increase suicide rates across the U.S. and Mexico

July 2018

Suicide rates are likely to rise as the earth warms, according to new research published July 23 in Nature Climate Change. The study, led by Stanford economist Marshall Burke, finds that projected...

Rosenkranz Prize winner hopes to develop malaria vaccine targeting pregnant women

July 2018

Pregnant women and their unborn children are more susceptible to the adverse consequences of malaria.

Stanford scholars discuss the benefits and risks of using talking software to address mental health

July 2018

Interacting with a machine may seem like a strange and impersonal way to seek mental health care, but advances in technology and artificial intelligence are making that type of engagement more and...

More C02 in the air could lead to more human disease

July 2018

The rising level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere means that crops are becoming less nutritious, and that change could lead to higher rates of malnutrition that predispose people to various...

Stanford scholars examine causes and consequences of people dropping ACA plans

June 2018

The health insurance marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could unravel because its enrollees strategically drop in and out of coverage, Stanford scholars write in a new working...

Millions could have incorrect statin, aspirin & blood pressure prescriptions

June 2018

More than 11 million Americans may have incorrect prescriptions for aspirin, statins and blood pressure medications, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of...

APARC Says Farewell to 2017-2018 Corporate Affiliate Visiting Fellows

June 2018

 On May 24, Shorenstein APARC hosted the final three research presentations by this year’s Corporate Affiliate Visiting Fellows.

New Stanford study suggests climate mitigation could yield trillions in economic benefits

May 2018

Failing to meet climate mitigation goals laid out in the U.N.

Reducing tapeworm infection could improve academic performance, reduce poverty, Stanford research suggests

May 2018

A Stanford-led study in China has revealed for the first time high levels of a potentially fatal tapeworm infection among school-age children.

Cuts to Medicaid hurt all kids, rich and poor

May 2018

Cuts to Medicaid hurt all children — rich and poor.

New Policy Brief Looks at Life Expectancy and Inequality in Life Expectancy in the United States

May 2018

A new SIEPR policy brief examines the growing life expectancy gap between low-income and high-income Americans. Coauthored by Victor R.

People

Kathryn M. McDonald Senior Research Scholar Executive Director, CHP/PCOR, Senior Scholar, CHP/PCOR
Grant Miller Senior Fellow Associate Professor, Medicine (CHP/PCOR)
David Relman Senior Fellow Professor, Medicine, Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
Douglas K. Owens Senior Fellow Professor, Medicine (CHP/PCOR)
Scott Rozelle Senior Fellow, Helen F. Farnsworth Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Stephen P. Luby Senior Fellow Professor, Medicine (CHP/PCOR)
Rosamond L. Naylor Senior Fellow William Wrigley Professor of Earth System Science, Senior Fellow, Stanford Woods Institute and Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Professor, by courtesy, Economics, Senior Fellow and Founding Director, Center on Food Security and the Environment
Paul H. Wise Senior Fellow Professor, Pediatrics (CHP/PCOR)
Matthew Kohrman Senior Fellow, by courtesy Associate Professor, Anthropology
Pascaline Dupas Senior Fellow Associate Professor, Economics, Senior Fellow, SIEPR
Jay Bhattacharya Senior Fellow, by courtesy Professor, Medicine (CHP/PCOR)
Alberto Díaz-Cayeros Senior Fellow Professor, by courtesy, Political Science