Skip to:

Governance

Governance

FSI's research on the origins, character and consequences of government institutions spans continents and academic disciplines. The institute’s senior fellows and their colleagues across Stanford examine the principles of public administration and implementation. Their work focuses on how maternal health care is delivered in rural China, how public action can create wealth and eliminate poverty, and why U.S. immigration reform keeps stalling. 

FSI’s work includes comparative studies of how institutions help resolve policy and societal issues. Scholars aim to clearly define and make sense of the rule of law, examining how it is invoked and applied around the world. 

FSI researchers also investigate government services – trying to understand and measure how they work, whom they serve and how good they are. They assess energy services aimed at helping the poorest people around the world and explore public opinion on torture policies. The Children in Crisis project addresses how child health interventions interact with political reform. Specific research on governance, organizations and security capitalizes on FSI's longstanding interests and looks at how governance and organizational issues affect a nation’s ability to address security and international cooperation.

Recent Other Publications

Records 48 / 300

It's Not Too Late to Prevent a Russia-China Axis

September 2018

Chinese tanks splashed through the mud, while a few dozen helicopters flew in formation overhead in eastern Russia, and a young Chinese military recruit explained, “I have never experienced an...

Taiwan's Place in the Evolving Security Environment of East Asia

July 2018

In March 2018 the Taiwan Democracy and Security Project, a part of the U.S.-Asia Security Initiative at Stanford University’s Shorenstein Asia- Pacific Research Center, convened a workshop that...

The Self-Inflicted Demise of American Power

July 2018

NATO leaders have a lot to worry about. The U.K. government is a Brexit hot mess.

Atomic Homefront: a film about struggling to live with Manhattan Project radioactive waste

June 2018

Abstract: This commentary reviews and discusses HBO’s new documentary, Atomic Homefront, which shows how communities are still struggling to live with radiation from radioactive waste generated...

Andrew Grotto Testimony on "Cybersecurity and California Elections"

March 2018

To assess the threat to California's elections systems, the Assembly and Senate elections committees held a joint informational hearing on cybersecurity. The hearing discussed steps California...

Offensive Cyber Capabilities: To What Ends?

January 2018

Abstract: There is a growing interest in the use of offensive cyber capabilities (OCC) among states.

Global Europe: Rethinking migration, democracy, and what sustains Europe at home at abroad

December 2017

The "Brexit" has been seen as a major blow that changes the future of Europe, at the time when nationalist and separatist movements seem most ascendant, and the EU seems to be the toxic subject for...

Who Leads the West and Why: Trump or Merkel? Constitutional Cultures in the United States and Germany

September 2017

Theodor Fontane, the master of German realist fiction, published his first novel, Before the Storm, in 1876.

Is the War Danger in Korea Real?

August 2017

President Donald Trump's ominous threat to unleash “fire and fury” on North Korea succeeded at least in garnering the attention of not only Kim Jong Un but the globe.

Why deciding to ‘move forward’ with Putin is a big mistake

July 2017

In his readout of the first meeting between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson praised the desire of both presidents to forget about the past —...

The North Korean Missile Test Pushes Xi and Putin Closer

July 2017

The most dangerous impact of North Korea’s long-range missile test this past week may not have been the one in the Sea of Japan, felt in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo.

Surviving the Trump-Moon Summit

July 2017

In the days leading up to the Washington summit between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and U.S. President Donald Trump, the tension in Seoul was hard to escape.

The Trump Tower Peace Theory

June 2017

President Donald Trump ascended to office with an estimated $3.5 billion of personal wealth tied up in his global real estate empire.

Social Media, New Technologies and the Middle East

June 2017

It is a global story, a new industrial revolution.

 The Illusions of Disillusion

June 2017

 Three-quarters of 1 percent: that was the vote tally
 that Jean-Marie Le Pen managed to eke out the first time he ran for the presidency of France in the early 1970s.

Celebrating the First 10 Years of the China Program

June 2017

The China Program at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center marks its 10th anniverary in 2017.

A German chancellor like no other

June 2017

Helmut Kohl, the long-serving German leader who reunified his country after the fall of the Berlin Wall and championed Europe’s integration, died on Friday at 87.

South Korea Votes for Change: What It Means for the United States

May 2017

President-elect Moon has gained office riding a wave of demand for social justice and a reform of democratic governance in South Korea.

Nationalism, Populism, Islamism

May 2017

Not that long ago, debates over politics were anchored in a clear opposition between universalism and relativism.

Changing the Script at Mar-a-Lago

April 2017

Two events - the U.S.

France Isn't Good For The Jews

April 2017

Born into a Jewish family in Algeria in 1948, Bernard-Henri Lévy was raised in Paris, where he enrolled in the elite Ecole Normale in the embattled year of 1968.

Womenomics, the Workplace, and Women Final Report

March 2017

The Japan Program at Stanford’s Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), with the generous support of the United States-Japan Foundation and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science,...

This is why Democrats lose in ‘rural’ postindustrial America

February 2017

In my earlier post I suggested that voters in rural areas and small industrial towns are often two rather distinct demographic groups that should not be conflated.

‘Red’ America is an illusion. Postindustrial towns go for Democrats.

February 2017

Media professionals and intellectuals in the large coastal cities have long struggled to understand the white, non-metropolitan counties in the middle of the country.

People

Herb Lin Herbert Lin Senior Research Scholar
thumbnail ddo photo Joseph Felter Lecturer
Didi Kuo Didi Kuo Senior Research Scholar, CDDRL, Associate Director for Research, CDDRL Academic Research & Program Manager, American Democracy in Comparative Perspective
dinsha headshot Dinsha Mistree Research Affiliate, CDDRL
rsd19 072 0081a Harold Trinkunas Senior Research Scholar
Dr. Jean C. Oi Jean C. Oi Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
2015 eileen donahoe 04 web Eileen Donahoe Lecturer, CDDRL
Martha Crenshaw Martha Crenshaw Senior Fellow, Emerita, Professor, by courtesy, Political Science, Emerita
Marisa Kellam Marisa Kellam Visiting Scholar, CDDRL
Jamie O'Connell headshot Jamie O'Connell Affiliate, CDDRL Lecturer in Residence at Stanford Law School
fishkin 2 James S. Fishkin Affiliated Faculty, CDDRL
Jacquelyn Schneider Jacquelyn Schneider Hoover Fellow