Human Rights

Scholarly Publications

30 Years of World Politics: What Has Changed?

January 2020

Since the publication of the Journal of Democracy began in 1990, the political climate has shifted from one of democratic gains and optimism to what Larry Diamond labels a “democratic recession.”...

Early-Modern Rights Regimes: A Genealogy of Revolutionary Rights

January 2017

Most histories of early-modern rights focus on particular concepts of rights: for instance, notions of subjective vs.

Is There a “Modern” Natural Law Theory? Notes on the History of Human Rights

December 2016

Human rights are a complex concept with distinct parts, whose histories are often independent from one another.

Other Publications

Mining Toromocho and Resettling Morococha

March 2020

It’s August 2013, and the Mining and Metallurgical Geological Institute of Peru (INGEMMET) is considering issuance of a report declaring the Morococha district a high-risk zone.

The Papal Human Rights Discourse: The Difference Pope Francis Makes

February 2019

Religious actors and their political concepts are commonly assumed to be conservative, static, and aligned with the private contemplative world.

Can the South Asian Academic Speak from Abroad? Colonialism and Anticolonialism in Modi’s America

January 2016

Following her signing of an open letter registering concerns about potential privacy abuses with Digital India and her op-ed "How to Think About Modi's Visit to Silicon Valley," Stanford historian...

News

The Human Rights Crisis in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

November 2019

Shall I tell you why we have brought you here? To cure you! To make you sane! Will you understand, Winston, that no one whom we bring to this place ever leaves our hands uncured?

Shining Light on the Threats to Democracy and Human Rights in Asia

November 2019

Around the world, democracy is in retreat.

Shorenstein Journalism Award Winner Maria Ressa Describes Philippine Broken Information Ecosystem, Democratic Recession

October 2019

“This is an existential moment for global power structures, turned upside down by technology.

Events

CANCELED: Data-intensive Innovation and the State: Evidence from Facial Recognition AI Firms in China

March 13, 2020

IMPORTANT EVENT UPDATE: In keeping with Stanford University's March 3 message to the campus community on COVID-19 and current recommendations of the CDC, the Asia-Pacific Research Center is...

CANCELED: The Social and Economic Impact of COVID-19 in Asia and Beyond

February 25, 2020

 IMPORTANT EVENT UPDATE: In keeping with Stanford University's March 3 message to the campus community on COVID-19 and current recommendations of the CDC, the Asia-Pacific Research Center is...

The Origins of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011

February 3, 2020

This event is co-sponsored with The Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies.ABSTRACTOrganized groups with cross class networks and institutional links to different social constituencies have often been...

Projects

Program on Human Rights Winter Speaker Series

U.S. Human Rights NGOs and International Human RightsMany U.S. human rights non-government organizations, including the U.S. philanthropic sector, work on international human rights.
English

Migration

Through periods of colonial expansion, New World emigration, postcolonial immigration, and Eurozone migration, Europe has been shaped and reshaped by the constant movement of people and communities...
English

Multimedia

The Political Climate in Venezuela: A Conversation with Armando Armas and Freddy Guevara

June 2016

   CDDRL Mosbacher Director Francis Fukuyama interviews Armando Armas and Freddy Guevara, members of Venezuela's National Assembly in Buenos Aires, Argentina on the current situation of Venezuelan politics.  The interview took place on May 30,...

Burma's Transition to Democracy: A Conversation with Larry Diamond

April 2016

On April 5, Mosbacher Director of CDDRL Francis Fukuyama held an interview with FSI Senior Fellow Larry Diamond on Burma's recent elections and it's ongoing transition to democracy.

Between Cyclops and Leviathan: Violence, Order, and Legitimacy at the Urban Margins

April 2016

Abstract:Ongoing crises of urban insecurity in Central America have spurred novel forms of state engagement in high-risk neighbourhoods.

People

Jeremy M. Weinstein Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Eileen Donahoe Lecturer, CDDRL
Jenny Martinez Senior Fellow, by courtesy Professor, Law
John Meyer Professor, Sociology, Emeritus
Francisco Ramirez Professor, Education
Amr Hamzawy Senior Research Scholar, CDDRL
Jamie O'Connell Network Affiliate, CDDRL, Lecturer in Residence at Stanford Law School
Jessie Brunner Research Assistant, PHR
Rochelle Terman Rochelle Terman Affiliate
Shiri Krebs Shiri Krebs Affiliate