Publications

fsi books

Publications

Browse FSI scholarship on geopolitics, global health, energy, cybersecurity and more.

Publications

Filter:

Filter results Close
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
Thomas Fingar
Books

China's Vision of World Order

Thomas Fingar, Thomas Fingar
National Bureau of Asian Research , 2012

China has benefited from the liberal international order led by the United States. However, China is uncomfortable with aspects of the current system and will seek to change them as part of a broader effort to reform global institutions to reflect its perception of 21st-century realities. One set of shaping factors—China’s assessment of the current world order—identifies much that Chinese leaders would be reluctant to change because they want to continue to reap benefits without assuming greater burdens.

Show body
Journal Articles

Intelligence as a Service Industry

Thomas Fingar
The American Interest , 2012

First paragraph of the article:

Show body
Journal Articles

Global Implications of China's Challenges – Part I

Thomas Fingar
YaleGlobal Online , 2012

For the past two decades China has been a poster child of successful globalization, integrating with the world and in the process lifting millions of citizens out of poverty. But China’s integration into the world economy and global trends drive and constrain Beijing’s ability to manage growing social, economic and political challenges. 

Show body
Journal Articles

Intelligence and Grand Strategy

Thomas Fingar
Orbis , 2012

Abstract:


Elegant strategies can be constructed without reference to intelligence but persuading policymakers to implement them without knowing what intelligence might have to say about their likely efficacy and unintended consequences would be exceedingly difficult. Intelligence-derived information and insights should not dictate the goals of grand strategy, but they should inform decisions about what to do, how to do it, and what to look for in order to assess how well or badly the strategy is working.

Show body
Books

Global Trends 2025: Implications for South Korea and the US-ROK Alliance

Thomas Fingar
Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center , 2011
Show body
Books

Alternate Trajectories of the Roles and Influence of China and the United States in Northeast Asia and the Implications for Future Power Configurations

Thomas Fingar, L. Gordon Flake
Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation, in One Step Back? Reassessing an Ideal Security State for Asia 2025 , 2011

"Whether China and the United States maintain basically cooperative or fundamentally antagonistic relations obviously has very different implications for the region and for the prospects and policies of others in—and beyond—NEA," states Thomas Fingar in the chapter "Alternate Trajectories of the Roles and Influence of China and the United States in Northeast Asia and the Implications for Future Power Configurations" (One Step Back? Reassessing an Ideal Security State for Asia 2025, 2011).

Show body
Books

Analysis in the U.S. Intelligence Community: Missions, Masters, and Methods

Thomas Fingar
National Research Council of the National Academies , 2011
Show body
Books

Reducing Uncertainty: Intelligence Analysis and National Security

Thomas Fingar
Stanford University Press , 2011

Description from Stanford University Press:

The US government spends billions of dollars every year to reduce uncertainty: to monitor and forecast everything from the weather to the spread of disease. In other words, we spend a lot of money to anticipate problems, identify opportunities, and avoid mistakes. A substantial portion of what we spend—over $50 billion a year—goes to the U.S. intelligence community.

Show body
Commentary

How China views US nuclear policy

Thomas Fingar
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists , 2011

Article Highlights

  • Although Chinese academics and military officers praised some aspects of the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review, they continue to view US nuclear policy with suspicion.
  • The factors responsible for negative Chinese reactions include bad timing, concerns about China's deterrent capability, a lack of consultation, and cultural differences.
  • Improved dialogue between the US and China on security issues can help reduce the potential for misperception and mistrust.
Show body
Books

Office of the Director of National Intelligence: Promising Start Despite Ambiguity, Ambivalence, and Animosity

Thomas Fingar, Roger Z. George, Harvey Rishikof
Georgetown University Press in "The National Security Enterprise: Navigating the Labyrinth" , 2011

Recent breakdowns in American national security have exposed the weaknesses of the nation's vast overlapping security and foreign policy bureaucracy and the often dysfunctional interagency process. In the literature of national security studies, however, surprisingly little attention is given to the specific dynamics or underlying organizational cultures that often drive the bureaucratic politics of U.S. security policy.

Show body
Working Papers

Global Trends and Security in the Muslim World: Dilemmas for U.S. and Regional Policy

Stephen R. Grand, Tamara Cofman Wittes, Thomas Fingar, Jamal al Suwaidi
The Brookings Institution , 2009

In this U.S.-Islamic World Forum discussion paper, Stephen Grand, Tamara Wittes, Thomas Fingar and Jamal al Suwaidi investigate new and non-traditional security challenges and how they are likely to affect U.S.-Muslim world relations.

Show body

Pages