Publications

fsi books

Publications

Browse FSI scholarship on geopolitics, global health, energy, cybersecurity and more.

Featured Publications

image of a bowl of cartoon frogs with the word Gab on the front

Gabufacturing Dissent: An In-depth Analysis of Gab

Gab was founded in 2016 as an uncensored alternative to mainstream social media platforms. Stanford Internet Observatory’s latest report looks at behaviors and dynamics across the platform.
Liberalism and Its Discontents by Francis Fukuyama

Liberalism and Its Discontents

It's no secret that liberalism hasn't always lived up to its own ideals. But in this short, clear account, Francis Fukuyama offers an essential defense of a revitalized liberalism for the twenty-first century.
Everything Counts: Building a Control Regime for Nonstrategic Nuclear Warheads in Europe

Building a Control Regime for Nonstrategic Nuclear Warheads in Europe

A new report led by Rose Gottemoeller on non-strategic nuclear warhead policies in Europe, particulary in light of Russia's changing status in the global nuclear community.

Publications

Filter:

Filter results Close
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
James D. Fearon
Working Papers

Pragmatic Engagement Amidst Global Uncertainty

Amy Zegart, Stephen D. Krasner, Karl Eikenberry, James D. Fearon, Frank Fukuyama, David M. Kennedy, Abraham D. Sofaer
Hoover Institution Press, 2016 February 2, 2016
The Hoover Institution’s Working Group on Foreign Policy and Grand Strategy has produced a national security strategy that acknowledges this uncertainty and hedges as well as engages, recognizing that resources are not limitless. This strategy also endeavors to lay out the conceptual and policy road map for success
Show body
Books

Ethnicity, Insurgency, and Civil War

David Laitin, James D. Fearon
The Contemporary Conflict Resolution Reader, edited by Hugh Miall, Tom Woodhouse, Oliver Ramsbotham, and Christopher Mitchell, 2015 March 23, 2015

"Ethnicity, Insurgency, and Civil War" is chapter 25 of the book The Contemporary Conflict Resolution Reader, edited by Hugh Miall, Tom Woodhouse, Oliver Ramsbotham, and Christopher Mitchell and published by Polity.

Show body
Journal Articles

Can Development Aid Contribute to Social Cohesion after Civil War? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Post-Conflict Liberia

Jeremy M. Weinstein, James D. Fearon, Macartan Humphreys
American Economic Review, 2009 May 1, 2009

Civil war is very common in the developing world, with harmful welfare effects when it occurs. Many fear that the devastation wrought by violent conflict destroys social capital, impedes economic development, and leads to the recurrence of violence (Paul Collier et al. 2003).

Show body
Journal Articles

Iraq's Civil War

James Fearon
Foreign Affairs, 2007 March 1, 2007

The White House still avoids the label, but by any reasonable historical standard, the Iraqi civil war has begun. The record of past such wars suggests that Washington cannot stop this one -- and that Iraqis will be able to reach a power-sharing deal only after much more fighting, if then. The United States can help bring about a settlement eventually by balancing Iraqi factions from afar, but there is little it can do to avert bloodshed now.

Show body
Testimonies

Iraq: Democracy or Civil War?

James D. Fearon
U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Government Reform, Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging Threats, and International Relations, 2006 September 15, 2006

James D. Fearon testified on 15 September 2006 before the U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Government Reform, Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging Threats, and International Relations, on the topic, "Iraq: Democracy or Civil War?"

 

Congressman Christopher Shays (R-CT), Chairman of the Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging Threats, and International Relations, convened a three-day oversight hearing entitled "Iraq: Democracy or Civil War?"

Fearon testified in the third of the following sessions that comprised the hearing:

Show body
Journal Articles

Primary Commodity Exports and Civil War

James D. Fearon
Journal of Conflict Resolution, 2005 December 31, 2005

Paul Collier and Anke Hoeffler at Oxford University have reported that countries with a higher percentage of national income from primary commodity exports have been more prone to civil war, an interesting finding that has received much attention from policy makers and the media. In this paper, James Fearon shows that this result is quite fragile, even using Collier and Hoeffler's data. Minor changes in the sample framing and the recovery of missing data undermine it.

Show body
Journal Articles

Separatist Wars, Partition, and World Order

James D. Fearon
Security Studies, 2004 July 1, 2004

Should ethnonationalist wars be resolved by formally partitioning states? The answer can't be decided case by case, because two incentive problems imply that ad hoc partitions have effects that extend across cases.

Show body
Journal Articles

Why Do Some Civil Wars Last So Much Longer Than Others?

James D. Fearon
Journal of Peace Research, 2004 May 1, 2004

Five factors are shown to be strongly related to civil war duration. Civil wars emerging from coups or revolutions tend to be short. Civil wars in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union have also tended to be relatively brief, as have anti-colonial wars. By contrast, 'sons of the soil' wars that typically involve land conflict between a peripheral ethnic minority and state-supported migrants of a dominant ethnic group are on average quite long-lived. So are conflicts in which a rebel group derives major funding from contraband such as opium, diamonds, or coca.

Show body
Journal Articles

Neotrusteeship and the Problem of Weak States

James Fearon, David Laitin
International Security, 2004 April 1, 2004

George W. Bush and his administration came into office with a self-consciously realist orientation in foreign policy. The president and his advisers derided the Clinton administration's multilateralism as mere form without national security substance. They viewed Russia and China as the main potential threats or sources of danger, and regarded Bill Clinton as a naïve idealist for neglecting these great powers in favor of "foreign policy as social work"--humanitarian ventures in areas peripheral to U.S. national security concerns.

Show body
Journal Articles

Ethnicity, Insurgency, and Civil War

James D. Fearon, David Laitin
American Political Science Review, 2003 February 1, 2003

An influential conventional wisdom holds that civil wars proliferated rapidly with the end of the Cold War and that the root cause of many or most of these has been ethnic and religious antagonisms. We show that the current prevalence of internal war is mainly the result of a steady accumulation of protracted conflicts since the 1950s and 1960s rather than a sudden change associated with a new, post-Cold War international system.

Show body