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Daniel C. Sneider
Books

North Korea: Peace? Nuclear War?

Daniel C. Sneider, William H. Overholt (Editor), Sung-yoon Lee, Chung-in Moon, Andrei Lankov, Carter J. Eckert, Jiyong Zheng, Xingxing Wang, Eric Heginbotham, Richard Samuels, Victor Cha, Stephan Haggard, Daniel Sneider, Gary Samore
2019

The North Korean nuclear crisis presents the contemporary world’s greatest risk, not just of major war but most importantly of nuclear war. Despite its importance the crisis is being managed in a treacherous context of public ignorance and misinformation. Most Americans could not locate Korea on a map. This volume assembles the work of leading experts in the hope of dispelling the misinformation and lack of information. Every author in this volume writes from career-long study of Korea and personal experience in Korea.

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Policy Briefs

Assessing the Effectiveness of Alliance Responses to Regional and Global Threats

Michael M. Bosack and Marcus A. Morgan (with Karl W. Eikenberry, Belinda A. Yeomans, and Daniel C. Sneider)
2018

From 31 January through 1 February 2018, Stanford University’s U.S.-Asia Security Initiative (USASI) and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation (SPF), gathered in Tokyo representatives from the government, defense, and academic sectors of the United States and Japan for the second workshop of the U.S.-Japan Security and Defense Dialogue Series.

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Commentary

A Declaration Of Peace That Leads To War

Daniel C. Sneider
2018

On April 27, 2018, the leaders of the two Koreas are set to meet on the southern side of the demilitarized zone and sign a declaration of peace. In a carefully planned summit, negotiated in detail down to the dinner menu, Kim Jong Un and Moon Jae In will claim to have ended the suspended state of war between them and set the Korean peninsula firmly on the path to peace.

Do not be deceived, writes Daniel Sneider

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Commentary

In Florida, Dark Clouds Cover the Abe-Trump Summit

Daniel C. Sneider,
2018

When Prime Minister Abe Shinzo and President Donald Trump meet again in the familiar surroundings of the President’s Mar-a-Lago estate, every effort will be made to convey the impression of a gathering of two old friends, united in common purpose.

But since their previous meetings, cracks have opened up over key issues, beginning with trade but including foreign policy problems from North Korea to Russia and Iran.

For Abe, desperately trying to keep his own premiership alive, the goal is simple – to look like a leader who must be kept in place for the benefit of Japan.

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Commentary

The Peace Train Leaves The Station

Daniel C. Sneider
2018

In a flurry of developments that left experts stunned, the long-stalled Korean peace train has suddenly left the station. Sitting in the locomotive is the engineer of these events, North Korea’s young leader, Kim Jong Un.

Where is the peace train headed? No one really knows. It can easily be derailed. And it could lead not to peace, but to war, writes Sneider.

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Commentary

Is the War Danger in Korea Real?

Daniel C. Sneider
Dun Jiao Du , 2017

President Donald Trump's ominous threat to unleash “fire and fury” on North Korea succeeded at least in garnering the attention of not only Kim Jong Un but the globe. The vague assertion of readiness to carry out a preventive attack on North Korea, even to use nuclear weapons, roiled stock markets, sent Japanese to look for bomb shelters and prompted alarmed warnings against the use of force from both foes and allies, including South Korean President Moon Jae-in. The piece is available in Chinese, English and Japanese.

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Commentary

The North Korean Missile Test Pushes Xi and Putin Closer

Daniel C. Sneider
Tokyo Business Today , 2017

The most dangerous impact of North Korea’s long-range missile test this past week may not have been the one in the Sea of Japan, felt in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo. It was in Moscow where Chinese leader Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin locked arms in a united front on how to respond to the growing North Korea crisis. The target of this front was not, however, North Korea. It was the United States, who the Sino-Russian axis accused of pursuing a military “buildup” in the region.

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Commentary

Surviving the Trump-Moon Summit

Daniel C. Sneider
Toyo Keizai Online (Tokyo Business Today) , 2017

In the days leading up to the Washington summit between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and U.S. President Donald Trump, the tension in Seoul was hard to escape. Fears of an open clash between the two leaders, of a handshake that went on too long, or of a hostile early morning tweet directed at Moon were widespread. But when a senior national security advisor to Moon met a group of American visitors after the first day of talks, he was visibly relieved. The dinner between Moon and U.S.

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Commentary

South Korea Votes for Change: What It Means for the United States

Daniel C. Sneider
The National Bureau of Asian Research , 2017

President-elect Moon has gained office riding a wave of demand for social justice and a reform of democratic governance in South Korea. These are the issues that are certain to consume his attention and that of voters. U.S. policymakers need to be mindful that the domestic factors that led to this shift in power in South Korea will remain paramount. That said, the return to power of South Korea’s progressives augurs a significant shift in several areas of policy that will have a clear impact on alliance relations with the United States.

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Commentary

Trump's North Korea Policy: Let China Do It

Daniel C. Sneider
Toyo Keizai Online (Tokyo Business Today) , 2017

Donald Trump continues to unnerve capitals and feed a media drumbeat about impending war in Korea with his vague warnings, in interviews and tweets, of “major, major conflict” on the horizon. But the reality of American policy is best captured in a comment by the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, to her Chinese counterpart at a White House gathering last week. Haley turned to the Chinese Ambassador, an attendee told a reporter, and said “something like, ‘We look to you to solve this for us.’”

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Commentary

Changing the Script at Mar-a-Lago

Daniel C. Sneider
Toyo Keizai Online (Tokyo Business Today) , 2017

Two events - the U.S. airstrike on an airbase in Syria following the regime's chemical weapons attack and the leaked reports about tensions between White House staff - shifted the agenda of the summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, and sidelined, at least for now, talk of a trade war between China and the United States.

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Policy Briefs

President Trump's Asia Inbox

Gi-Wook Shin, Michael H. Armacost, Takeo Hoshi, Karl Eikenberry, Thomas Fingar, Kathleen Stephens, Daniel C. Sneider, Donald K. Emmerson
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center , 2017

Scholars at Stanford's Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies assess the strategic situation in East Asia to be unsettled, unstable, and drifting in ways unfavorable for American interests. These developments are worrisome to countries in the region, most of which want the United States to reduce uncertainty about American intentions by taking early and effective steps to clarify and solidify U.S. engagement. In the absence of such steps, they will seek to reduce uncertainty and protect their own interests in ways that reduce U.S.

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Commentary

Donald Trump's Trade Policy: Back to The Future

Daniel C. Sneider
Toyo Keizai Online (Tokyo Business Today) , 2017

If you want to understand the trade and industrial policy that President Donald Trump is now going to pursue, simply jump into a DeLorean time machine with Marty McFly and go back to 1985. As the title of that iconic film, released that year, proclaimed – it is Back to the Future, Sneider writes.

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Commentary

The Repudiation of American Internationalism and What It Means for Japan

Daniel C. Sneider
Toyo Keizai Online , 2016

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has apparently decided to hold an urgent meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in New York, on his way to the Asia Pacific Economic summit in Peru. It is far from clear what the Prime Minister hopes to accomplish, or whether such a meeting will even be a good idea, so early in the transition process. But one thing is surely true – the Prime Minister needs to go into that meeting with a clear understanding of what has happened in the U.S. and what it could mean for U.S.-Japan relations, Sneider writes.

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Policy Briefs

Japan's Evolving Defense Policy and U.S.-Japan Security Cooperation: Expectations versus Reality

Belinda A. Yeomans, Executive Summary by Daniel C. Sneider
Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center , 2016

The inaugural U.S.-Japan security workshop, held in Tokyo, Japan, on May 19, 2016, convened senior Japanese and American policymakers, scholars and regional experts to discuss Japan's security policy and alliance between Japan and the United States, hosted by Stanford's U.S.-Asia Security Initiative at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

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Commentary

The Logic of North Korea's Nuclear Test

Daniel C. Sneider
Toyo Keizai Online , 2016

It is tempting to characterize the recent round of North Korea missile and nuclear tests as only the latest example of the provocative behavior of its brash young leader, Kim Jong Un. A simultaneous launch of three medium-range missiles, mounted on mobile launchers, was defiantly timed to coincide with China’s hosting of the G20 summit in Hangzhou. And the latest nuclear test, the fifth carried out by North Korea, seemed designed to assert its status as a nuclear weapons power ahead of the U.S. presidential vote, Sneider writes.

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Policy Briefs

U.S.-ROK-Japan Trilateralism: Building Bridges and Strengthening Cooperation

Daniel C. Sneider, Yul Sohn, Yoshihide Soeya
National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) , 2016

In this three-part NBR Special Report, experts from the United States, South Korea, and Japan offer critical insights into both the past and future of trilateral cooperation and provide recommendations for leaders in all three nations to move the relationship forward.

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Books

Divergent Memories: Opinion Leaders and the Asia-Pacific War

Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider
Stanford University Press , 2016

No nation is free from the charge that it has a less-than-complete view of the past. History is not simply about recording past events—it is often contested, negotiated, and reshaped over time. The debate over the history of World War II in Asia remains surprisingly intense, and Divergent Memories examines the opinions of powerful individuals to pinpoint the sources of conflict: from Japanese colonialism in Korea and atrocities in China to the American decision to use atomic weapons against Japan.

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Policy Briefs

Advancing U.S.-Japan-ROK Trilateral Cooperation: A U.S. Perspective

Daniel C. Sneider
National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) , 2016

An analysis of the foundations and future of the trilateral relationship from a U.S. perspective, highlighting the critical role the United States has played in mediating tensions between the Republic of Korea and Japan.

The essay is also part of an expanded NBR Special Report with co-authors Yul Sohn and Yoshihide Soeya that offers insights into both the past and future of trilateral cooperation and provides recommendations for leaders in all three nations to move relations foward.

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Commentary

Behind the Comfort Women Agreement

Daniel C. Sneider
Toyo Keizai Online , 2016

The breakthrough agreement on the comfort women issue between Japan and South Korea on Dec. 28, 2015, was the culmination of at least four years of negotiations between the two governments. South Korean President Park Geun-hye and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pushed for the agreement; the Obama administration provided persistent pressure while resisting a mediation role.

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Policy Briefs

Shinzo Abe and the Reality of Japanese Democracy

Daniel C. Sneider
The National Bureau of Asian Research , 2015

Writing for the National Bureau of Asian Research, Daniel Sneider examines Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s recent attempts to revise Japan’s defense guidelines. He considers how these attempts may affect the Japanese domestic political landscape and the implications that Abe’s actions may have for key issues in the U.S.-Japan alliance, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership and U.S. military interests in Okinawa.

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Books

Reflections on the Seventieth Anniversary of the End of the Pacific War: Eight Stanford Scholars Write Their Own August Statement

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Peter Duus, Thomas Fingar, David Holloway, Takeo Hoshi, Yong Suk Lee, Henry S. Rowen, Daniel C. Sneider
2015

On August 15, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will publish a short statement to commemorate the seventieth anniversary of the end of World War II.  This follows similar practices of his predecessors.  Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama started by delivering a short statement on the fiftieth anniversary in 1995.  Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi followed in 2005 with the statement on the sixtieth anniversary.

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Books

太平洋戦争終結70周年に考える:8人のスタンフォード研究者による終戦の日の談話

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Peter Duus, Thomas Fingar, David Holloway, Takeo Hoshi, Yong Suk Lee, Henry S. Rowen, Daniel C. Sneider
2015

8月15日、安倍首相は第2次大戦終結70周年を記念する談話を発表する。戦後50周年(1995年)の村山談話、そして60周年(2005年)の小泉談話に続くものだ。

ショーレンスタイン・アジア太平洋研究センター (APARC) とフリーマン・スポグリ国際研究所 (FSI) に所属する8人の学者が、自分が日本の首相だったら発表するであろう談話を書き上げた。

英語版はこちらをご覧ください。

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Books

Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies

Daniel Chirot, Gi-Wook Shin, Daniel C. Sneider
University of Washington Press, Jackson School Publications in International Studies , 2014

The legacy of the Second World War has been, like the war itself, an international phenomenon. In both Europe and Asia, common questions of criminality, guilt, and collaboration have intersected with history and politics on the local level to shape the way that wartime experience has been memorialized, reinterpreted, and used.

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Policy Briefs

Japan-Korea Relations: Time for U.S. Intervention?

Daniel C. Sneider
National Bureau of Asian Research , 2014

Daniel Sneider writes that relations between South Korea and Japan have noticeably deteriorated in the past few months. After a recent trip to Seoul, Sneider postures that diplomatic ties may be at their lowest since 1965.  While the United States has attempted to promote dialogue, its hesitant intervention is unlikely to change the overall dynamic of the Japan-Korea relationship. Sneider suggests a more active U.S. mediation role, such as appointing a special envoy or negotiating reparations, may better encourage reconciliation and normalization of relations.

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