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FSI scholars offer expert commentary and convene thought leadership events on contemporary global issues.

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Wondering what's really going on in North Korea or Russia? Or how climate change or the health-care debate could affect your life? On FSI's Medium blog, faculty give context for the latest global issues and help us understand what's likely to happen next. Looking ahead, Stanford students tell us about their research and internships and give a glimpse of tomorrow's global policy landscape.

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Totalitarianism as a Mindset Can Be Anywhere

Commentary / March 27, 2020

The authors of “The End of History” and “Reading Lolita in Tehran” discuss coronavirus, Iran, James Baldwin, campus culture, and why imagination and literature are essential to combatting authoritarianism. Read here

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How We Can Manage the Pandemic and Preserve our Democracy

Commentary / March 27, 2020

COVID-19 presents us with both our worst public health crisis in a century and the greatest challenge to our democracy since World War II. Here is a national strategy to address both challenges, writes Larry Diamond. Read here

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Doctrinal Confusion and Cultural Dysfunction in the Pentagon Over Information and Cyber Operations

Commentary / March 27, 2020

In a Lawfare post earlier this year, I questioned the wisdom of referring to cyber operations as psychological operations. These campaigns are the bread and butter of U.S. Cyber Command’s operational activities.

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NATO’s 30th Member, At Last: Republic of North Macedonia

Blog / March 27, 2020

In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, good news often goes missing.  It’s worth highlighting that today, March 27, NATO has a new member, the Republic of North Macedonia.   Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg tweeted the news from NATO HQ in Brussels, and Skopje, the capital, was ecstatic: "The Republic of North Macedonia is officially the new, 30th NATO member," the government said in a statement. "We have fulfilled the dream of generations."

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When COVID-19 Delays a Nuclear Non-Proliferation Conference, Is There a Silver Lining?

Blog / March 26, 2020

Rose Gottemoeller is the Payne Distinguished Lecturer at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Center for Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, and was formerly the Deputy Secretary General of NATO

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Nuclear waste disposal: Why the case for deep boreholes is … full of holes

Commentary / March 26, 2020

In the budding days of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Trump idled his days away, launching random tweets about unrelated issues. One such issue was nuclear waste disposal: “Nevada, I hear you on Yucca Mountain…my Administration is committed to exploring innovative approaches – I’m confident we can get it done!”

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‘Just Say No’ Is Not a Strategy for Supply Chain Security

Commentary / March 25, 2020

On Feb. 12, White House National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien announced that the U.S. government has “evidence that Huawei has the capability secretly to access sensitive and personal information in systems it maintains and sells around the world.” This represents the latest attempt by the Trump administration to support an argument that allied governments—and the businesses they oversee—should purge certain telecommunications networks of Huawei equipment.

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Is the Coronavirus as Deadly as They Say?

Commentary / March 25, 2020
Current estimates about the Covid-19 fatality rate may be too high by orders of magnitude, Stanford Health Policy's Eran Bendavid and Jay Bhattacharya write in this editorial published in the Wall Street Journal.
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Winners Announced for the Fall 2019 Stanford e-Japan Award

News / March 24, 2020

Stanford e-Japan is an online course that teaches Japanese high school students about U.S. society and culture and U.S.–Japan relations. The course introduces students to both U.S. and Japanese perspectives on many historical and contemporary issues. It is offered biannually by the Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE). Stanford e-Japan is currently supported by the Yanai Tadashi Foundation.

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Anna Grzymala-Busse named CASBS 2020-2021 Fellow

News / March 24, 2020

Five Stanford scholars will be among 38 fellows in residence at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) during the 2020-21 academic year.

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SHP faculty to Teach Students How To Build COVID-19 Mathematical Projection Models for Policymakers

News / March 24, 2020
Stanford Health Policy's Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert and Stanford Medicine's Jason Andrews will be teaching a class for Stanford undergrads and graduate students on how to build mathematical models to help combat global infectious diseases like the COVID-19.
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As US-Russian Arms Control Faces Expiration, Sides Face Tough Choices

Commentary / March 23, 2020

The Trump administration’s proposal for trilateral arms control negotiations appears to be gaining little traction in Moscow and Beijing, and the era of traditional nuclear arms control may be coming to an end just as new challenges emerge. This is not to say that arms control should be an end in it itself. It provides a tool that, along with the right combination of deterrence and defense forces and proper doctrine, can enhance U.S. and allied security and promote stability.

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Blurring the lines of media authenticity: Prigozhin-linked group funding Libyan broadcast media

Blog / March 20, 2020

The Stanford Internet Observatory has been investigating new facets to the manipulation of the local media environment in Libya: Russian actors who are known to have previously created and sponsored online news media fronts and associated Facebook pages, now appear to be expanding into similar activities in broadcast media.

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Examining the Value of Pharmacy Benefit Managers

News / March 20, 2020
Most Americans don’t realize there are silent brokers helping to fix the price of their prescription drugs — or that it’s a $100 billion annual business accounting for half of Big Pharma sales.
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Pandemics & Propaganda: How Chinese State Media Shapes Conversations on The Coronavirus

Blog / March 19, 2020

The perception of China’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic has been a significant challenge for the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) over the past two months. The CCP has been attempting to control the narrative and deflect blame since the start of the outbreak, both domestically and abroad.

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A Perfect Storm: Victor Cha Talks COVID-19 Threat to North Korea, Nuclear Deadlock

Q&A / March 19, 2020

North Korea continues to declare that it has not had a single case of COVID-19, but health experts find it inconceivable that the infectious disease would not be in the country given its proximity to China and South Korea, two early victims of the pandemic. A coronavirus outbreak in the North could be devastating, says Asian affairs and security expert Victor Cha, as it would act on an extremely vulnerable population with already-compromised immune systems and outdated health care infrastructure.

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Now It Gets Much Harder: Thomas Fingar and Jean Oi Discuss China’s Challenges in The Washington Quarterly

News / March 19, 2020

In the last forty years, China has reemerged as a tremendous geopolitical, economic, and technological power on the world stage. But the easy phases of China’s quest for wealth and influence are over, argue Shorenstein APARC Fellow Thomas Fingar and China Program Director Jean Oi in a new article published by The Washington Quarterly.

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Stanford e-Kawasaki: Arches and Pillars of Support During an Unstable Time

Blog / March 18, 2020

Following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, I recall being astounded that the iconic arches and pillars of Stanford University—though damaged—didn’t collapse or fall during the powerful earthquake. Wooden supports were inserted below the arches and remained for years while retrofitting took place. Since then, the arches and pillars have symbolized for me the stability and the security of the foundation of Stanford University. During yet another unstable time in 2020, this symbolism has once again taken on critical significance here and abroad.

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Crimea:  Six Years after Illegal Annexation

Commentary / March 16, 2020

March 18 marks the sixth anniversary of Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea.  Attention now focuses on the Russian-Ukrainian conflict in Donbas, a conflict that has taken some 14,000 lives, but Moscow’s seizure of Crimea—the biggest land-grab in Europe since World War II—has arguably done as much or more damage to Europe’s post-Cold War security order.

 

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Zelensky’s Government Reshuffle in Ukraine Could Put Reforms at Risk

Commentary / March 13, 2020

In the most sweeping reshuffle of his government since he took office last May, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky fired his Cabinet and appointed a new prime minister earlier this month. The announcement comes at a tricky time, as the government is considering several reform measures that are seen as important to winning much-needed investor confidence.

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