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Protests demonstrate against Vladimir Putin outside a Russian-owned international investment bank in Budapest, Hungary.

President Zelenskyy Speaks to Stanford Students in Special Video Address

Lyubov Sobol, an activist and visiting scholar at CDDRL, explains why the success of Russia's pro-democracy movement is important for geopolitical stability.
The Supreme Court

Protecting Reproductive Health Information Health Information Post-Roe v. Wade

Michelle Mello warns that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and end federal protections for abortion could also expose women's' personal health data in court.
Shinzo Abe speaking from a lectern

Reflections on the Assassination of Former Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe

Abe was one of the most transformative political leaders in modern Japanese history, and his passing will unquestionably shake-up Japanese politics, says Kiyoteru Tsutsui

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Marshall Burke
People gather at the UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, 2021.

Lawmakers are Slowly Warming Up to Policy on Climate Change

News / February 17, 2022
Climate expert Marshall Burke joins the World Class podcast to talk through what’s going right, what’s going wrong, and what more needs to be done to translate data on the climate crisis into meaningful policy.
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Orange smokey skies over San Francisco

Wildfire smoke exposure during pregnancy increases preterm birth risk, Stanford study finds

News / August 23, 2021
Smoke from wildfires may have contributed to thousands of additional premature births in California between 2007 and 2012. The findings underscore the value of reducing the risk of big, extreme wildfires and suggest pregnant people should avoid very smoky air.
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Aerial view of dry brown crop fields

Global warming increased U.S. crop insurance losses by $27 billion in 27 years, Stanford study finds

News / August 4, 2021
Higher temperatures attributed to climate change caused payouts from the nation’s biggest farm support program to increase by $27 billion between 1991 and 2017, according to new estimates from Stanford researchers. Costs are likely to rise even further with the growing intensity and frequency of heat waves and other severe weather events.
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An orange smokey sky behind a dark bridge over water

Stanford researchers offer practical tips to mitigate harm from wildfire smoke

News / July 7, 2021
Warnings of another severe wildfire season abound, as do efforts to reduce the risk of ignition. Yet few are taking precautions against the smoke. Stanford experts advise on contending with hazardous air quality.
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Graphic highlighting the cost of carbon

Stanford explainer: Social cost of carbon

Q&As / June 7, 2021
Marshall Burke and Lawrence Goulder explain the economic impacts of carbon emissions.
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 A man walks through a sandstorm in Chad

Air Pollution's Connection to Infant Mortality

News / June 29, 2020
The study of sub-Saharan Africa finds that a relatively small increase in airborne particles significantly increases infant mortality rates. A cost-effective solution may lie in an exotic-sounding proposal.
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What we need to know about the economics of climate change

News / April 14, 2016

Scientists have made huge strides in understanding the physical and biological dimensions of climate change, from deciphering why climate has changed in the past to predicting how it might change in the future.

As the body of knowledge on the physical science of climate grows, a missing link is emerging: What are the economic and social consequences of changes in the climate and efforts to control emissions of greenhouse gases?

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Human conflict heats up with global warming

News / April 6, 2015

A chance course at Stanford and a study-abroad trip to Nepal changed the trajectory of Marshall Burke's career, leading him to a human-focused approach studying climate change. His latest work deals with the link between rising temperatures and human violence. 

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