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All FSI News News November 1, 2021

Beatriz Magaloni Appointed Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations

The professorship is named in honor of Stanford’s first faculty member in international relations and was previously held by former CDDRL Director Steve Krasner.
Beatriz Magaloni
Professor Beatriz Magaloni

The Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) is delighted to share the news that Beatriz Magaloni has been named the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations, an endowed professorship established at the Stanford School of Humanities and Sciences (H&S) most recently held by former CDDRL Director Steve Krasner since 1991. Professor Magaloni is a professor in the Department of Political Science and a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI). She is also director of CDDRL’s Poverty, Violence and Governance Lab, which she founded in 2010. Most of her current work focuses on state repression, police, human rights, and violence.

“I am thrilled that my friend and colleague Beatriz Magaloni has been named the Graham Stuart Chair,” said Kathryn Stoner, Mosbacher Director of CDDRL. “I can think of no one more deserving to hold the chair following the retirement this year of Steve Krasner, who like Beatriz, is a giant in the field of international studies. We are extraordinarily lucky at CDDRL and Stanford to have them as colleagues.”

I can think of no one more deserving to hold the chair following the retirement this year of Steve Krasner, who like Beatriz, is a giant in the field of international studies. We are extraordinarily lucky at CDDRL and Stanford to have them as colleagues.
Kathryn Stoner
Moshbacher Director of CDDRL

The Graham H. Stuart Professorship in International Relations is named in honor of Stanford’s first faculty member in international relations. It was established in 1978 with a gift from Mrs. Flora Hewlett, a former Stanford trustee who died in 1977.

From the time he joined the Stanford political science faculty in 1923 until his retirement in 1952, Professor Stuart was one of the university’s most prominent scholars. His books include the classic Latin America and the United States, which has been reprinted many times since its publication in 1922; The Department of State; The International City of Tangier; and American Diplomatic and Consular Practice, which became the standard textbook for professional diplomats and college coursework in the field.

Professor Stuart administered the State Department’s war history unit during World War II and served the department in an advisory capacity for many years afterward. In 1952 his colleagues and former students established the Graham H. Stuart Award for outstanding seniors in political science, and in 1961 the Graham H. Stuart Fund was endowed to support the awards and the development of the political science library. Professor Stuart died in 1983 at the age of 97.

Mrs. Hewlett was born in Berkeley and received her degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1935. In addition to serving on the Stanford Board of Trustees, she was a trustee of the San Francisco Theological Seminary and a member of the World Affairs Council of Northern California executive committee.

Reacting to her appointment, Professor Magaloni shared, “I feel deeply honored to be named to this chair held for 30 years by my colleague and friend Steve Krasner, whose scholarship and public service I have long admired and learned from.”

I feel deeply honored to be named to this chair held for 30 years by my colleague and friend Steve Krasner, whose scholarship and public service I have long admired and learned from.
Beatriz Magaloni
Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations

In June 2021, Professor Magaloni was awarded the Heinz I. Eulau Award for the best article published in American Political Science Review. The award-winning article entitled “Killing in the Slums: Social Order, Criminal Governance and Police Violence in Rio de Janeiro," co-authored with Edgar Franco-Vivanco and Vanessa Melo, explores the conditions that allow criminal organizations to establish local governance structures and the mechanisms that enable the police to regain territorial control and legitimacy.

Her first book, Voting for Autocracy: Hegemonic Party Survival and its Demise in Mexico (Cambridge University Press, 2006), won the Best Book Award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association and the 2007 Leon Epstein Award for the Best Book published in the previous two years in the area of political parties and organizations. Her second book, The Political Logic of Poverty Relief (co-authored with Alberto Diaz Cayeros and Federico Estévez), also published by Cambridge University Press, studies the politics of poverty relief. Why clientelism is such a prevalent form of electoral exchange, how it distorts policies aimed at aiding the poor, and when it can be superseded by more democratic and accountable forms of electoral exchange are some of the central questions that the book addresses.

Prior to joining Stanford in 2001, Professor Magaloni was a visiting professor at UCLA and a professor of Political Science at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM). She earned a Ph.D. in Political Science from Duke University. She also holds a law degree from ITAM.

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Professor Beatriz Magaloni Wins the 2021 Heinz I. Eulau Award for Best Article Published in American Political Science Review

The award-winning article is entitled “Killing in the Slums: Social Order, Criminal Governance and Police Violence in Rio de Janeiro.” Professor Magaloni coauthored the article with Edgar Franco-Vivanco, who earned his Ph.D. from Stanford and is now at the University of Michigan; and with Vanessa Melo, a graduate student in Anthropology at UCLA.
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