Self-Incentivizing Networks

Keith Winstein, Ramesh Johari 2015 - 2016

Self-Incentivizing Networks

We are developing the engineering and economic tools to enable self-incentivizing enclaves on the Internet, where entrepreneurs can add incrementally to the network's capacity and be rewarded for their contribution, however small, to encourage the buildout of connectivity in under-served areas. This problem cuts across the domains of congestion-control, traffic engineering, and wide-area routing and settlement on the Internet.

Publications:
Matt V. Leduc, Matthew O. Jackson, Ramesh Johari, Pricing and referrals in diffusion on networks, In Games and Economic Behavior, Volume 104, 2017, Pages 568-594, ISSN 0899-8256, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geb.2017.05.011.

Researchers

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Keith Winstein

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Keith Winstein

Assistant Professor of Computer Science Assistant Professor of Law (by courtesy)
I am an assistant professor at Stanford University. From 2011–2014, I did my Ph.D. at MIT, advised by Hari Balakrishnan. Previously, I spent a year at Ksplice, Inc., a startup company (now part of Oracle Corp.) where I was the vice president of product management and business development and also cleaned the bathroom. Before that, I worked for three years as a staff reporter at The Wall Street Journal, covering health care, medicine, science and technology. I did my undergraduate work at MIT, where I received a B.S. (2004) and M.Eng. (2005) in electrical engineering and computer science. I also received an E.E. degree in 2014.
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Ramesh Johari

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Ramesh Johari

Associate Professor Management Science and Engineering Computer Science (by courtesy) and Electrical Engineering (by courtesy)
Ramesh Johari is an Associate Professor at Stanford University, with a full-time appointment in the Department of Management Science and Engineering (MS&E), and courtesy appointments in the Departments of Computer Science (CS) and Electrical Engineering (EE). He is a member of the Operations Research group and the Social Algorithms Lab (SOAL) in MS&E, the Information Systems Laboratory in EE, the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, the steering committee of the Stanford Cyber Initiative, and the Stanford Bits and Watts Initiative. He received an A.B. in Mathematics from Harvard, a Certificate of Advanced Study in Mathematics from Cambridge, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT.