Political Framing and its Propagation in Media

Dan Jurafsky, Matthew Gentzkow, Jure Leskovec, Jennifer Pan 2017 - 2018

Political Framing and its Propagation in Media

We propose to investigate political framing in digital media, using a novel combination of computational linguistics and machine learning tools to investigate key areas crucial for preserving democracy in the post-industrial world. These include the ability of governments or non-state actors to influence or undermine the democratic process through propaganda or agenda-setting, the way new media distinguish (or don’t distinguish) subjective opinions from objective data, how minority and majority groups are portrayed, and the way partisan frames emerge and diffuse. Our research makes use of data spanning different media, time periods, and content creators (e.g., journalists, ordinary citizens, politicians), including our own corpus of 50 billion news media articles and social media posts, as well as historical collections of media in multiple languages. Our project has the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the effect of cyber media on the political landscape as well as developing novel computational tools to help detect these latent influences on media.

Publications:
Pan, J. “How Market Dynamics of Domestic and Foreign Social Media Firms Shape Strategies of Internet Censorship.” Problems of Post-Communism Vol. 64 , Iss. 3-4,2017
Srijan Kumar, William L. Hamilton, Jure Leskovec, and Dan Jurafsky. "Community Interaction and Conflict on the Web." Proceedings of the 2018 World Wide Web Conference (WWW '18). International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, Republic and Canton of Geneva, Switzerland, 933-943. 2018. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3178876.3186141

Researchers

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Dan Jurafsky

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Dan Jurafsky

Professor and Chair of Linguistics and Professor of Computer Science
I study computational linguistics (natural language processing) and its application to the behavioral and social sciences. I am a past MacArthur Fellow and also write and teach about the language of food.
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Matthew Gentzkow

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Matthew Gentzkow

Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research
Matthew Gentzkow is Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He studies empirical industrial organization and political economy, with a specific focus on media industries. He received the 2014 John Bates Clark Medal, given by the American Economic Association to the American economist under the age of forty who has made the most significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, and the recipient of the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, several National Science Foundation grants for research on media, and a Faculty Excellence Award for teaching. He was educated at Harvard University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1997, a master's degree in 2002, and a PhD in 2004.
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Jure Leskovec

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Jure Leskovec

Associate Professor of Computer Science
I am Associate Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. My research focuses on mining and modeling large social and information networks, their evolution, and diffusion of information and influence over them. Problems I investigate are motivated by large scale data, the Web and on-line media. I am also Chief Scientist at Pinterest, leading Pinterest Labs.
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Jennifer Pan

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Jennifer Pan

Assistant Professor of Communication, Assistant Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science, and Assistant Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology
Jennifer Pan is an Assistant Professor of Communication, Assistant Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science, Assistant Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology at Stanford University. Her research examines information control and communication in authoritarian regimes to reveal political choices and outcomes in these opaque societies. Much of Pan’s work focuses on China and employs computational methods with large-scale digital data as well as field experiments for causal inference. Pan’s work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, and Science. Pan received the 2014 Kellogg/Notre Dame Award for the best paper in comparative politics by the Midwest Political Science Association.