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First Principles for Governing Academic Records in the Digital Era

Mitchell Stevens, Dan Boneh, Tom Black 2015 - 2016

First Principles for Governing Academic Records in the Digital Era

Digital learning environments and data analytics have dramatically expanded what might count as academic records, raising questions about the viability of inherited record systems predicated on paper or paper-equivalent documents and institutionally based verification systems.  Engineers and student services professionals at Stanford and worldwide are actively developing academic record systems more appropriate for a digital era.  Because academic credentials are increasingly fateful for people’s life chances, all of those who produce and purvey them must do so with careful attention to the privacy and discretion of learners and to the integrity of the human relationships inherent in any instructional process.  Our project specifies first principles for the ethical governance of these new technologies.

Publications:

Researchers

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Mitchell Stevens

Director, Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research and Director, Center for Advanced Research through Online Learning
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Mitchell Stevens

Director, Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research and Director, Center for Advanced Research through Online Learning
Associate Professor of Sociology (by courtesy)
Stevens is an organizational sociologist with longstanding interests in the quantification of educational processes, alternative educational forms, and the formal organization of knowledge.
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Dan Boneh

Co-director of the Stanford Computer Security Lab and Co-director of the Stanford Cyber Initiative
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Dan Boneh

Co-director of the Stanford Computer Security Lab and Co-director of the Stanford Cyber Initiative
Rajeev Motwani Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering
Professor Boneh heads the applied cryptography group and co-direct the computer security lab. Professor Boneh's research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His work includes cryptosystems with novel properties, web security, security for mobile devices, and cryptanalysis. He is the author of over a hundred publications in the field and is a Packard and Alfred P. Sloan fellow. He is a recipient of the 2014 ACM prize and the 2013 Godel prize. In 2011 Dr. Boneh received the Ishii award for industry education innovation. Professor Boneh received his Ph.D from Princeton University and joined Stanford in 1997.