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Cyber Systems in Healthcare Organizations

Melissa Valentine, Mohsen Bayati 2015 - 2017

Cyber Systems in Healthcare Organizations

Advanced cyber-systems hold tremendous promise for transforming modern hospitals, potentially improving their capacity, safety, and operational efficiency by extending limited human ability for memory, judgement, and situational awareness.  Yet technologies are not exogenous “interventions” into organizational systems.  Instead, they are shaped by and then in turn shape the social system, as people interpret and enact the technologies based on their professional identities or the power dynamics activated by the technology implementation process. Also, at present these systems are technically limited in their ability to support situational awareness and data-driven decision-making.  This research project aims to advance understanding of cyber-technology enactment and to advance the frontier of dynamic learning and decision-making in health care organizations. We plan to use ethnographic field research methods and operations research analytics to study and improve two health-care cyber-systems: real-time locating services (RTLS) at the Stanford South Bay Cancer Center and a new Hospital Operations Center (HOC) at the Stanford Hospital.

Publications:
Lauren Ann Destino, Melissa Valentine, Farnoosh H. Sheikhi, Amy J. Starmer, Christopher P. Landrigan, Lee Sanders. “Inpatient Hospital Factors and Resident Time With Patients and Families.” Pediatrics Apr 2017, e20163011; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2016-3011

Researchers

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Melissa Valentine

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Melissa Valentine

Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering
Melissa Valentine is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Management Science and Engineering Department, and a faculty member of the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization. She conducts multi-method studies of groups and teams in organizations, with a focus on temporary teams. Her studies use longitudinal or multi-case comparisons to identify enabling conditions of fast-paced coordination in temporary teams. Recent work has focused on how crowdsourcing platforms can be used to assemble, coordinate, and adapt flash teams and flash organizations. Prof Valentine also recently published an article on how complex organizations learn, using an in-depth field study of an academic cancer center.
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Mohsen Bayati

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Mohsen Bayati

Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology
Mohsen received a BS in Mathematics from Sharif University of Technology and a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2007. His dissertation was on algorithms and models for large-scale networks. During the summers of 2005 and 2006 he interned at IBM Research and Microsoft Research respectively. He was a Postdoctoral Researcher with Microsoft Research from 2007 to 2009 working mainly on applications of machine learning and optimization methods in healthcare and online advertising. In particular, he helped develop a system for predicting hospital patient readmissions and obtained a decision support mechanism for allocating scarce hospital resources to post-discharge care. Their system is currently used in several hospitals across US and Europe. He was a Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University from 2009 to 2011 with a research focus in high-dimensional statistical learning. In 2011 he joined Stanford University as a faculty, and since 2015 he is an associate professor of Operations, Information, and Technology at Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He was awarded the INFORMS Healthcare Applications Society best paper (Pierskalla) award in 2014 and in 2016, INFORMS Applied Probability Society best paper award in 2015, and National Science Foundation CAREER award.