Behavioral Biometrics

Russell Poldrack, David Mazières, Bahman Bahmani 2015 - 2017

Behavioral Biometrics

Authentication is one of the major problems faced by the society in interacting with cyber technology. Passwords, challenge questions, out-of-band text messages, and physiological biometrics create friction with user experience, and yet are increasingly bypassed by hackers. In this project, we will study the use of behavioral biometrics, i.e., the unique traits in user interactions with digital devices and services, for frictionless cyber authentication. We will use a principled approach based on human cognitive psychology, systems security, and data mining to design authentication schemes based on behavioral biometrics. Due to the critical importance of authentication in online and mobile banking and financial services, we will focus on and analyze the effectiveness of our authentication schemes for the use cases in this sector. Further, taking a cyber-social perspective, we will study societal aspects such as data protection legislation and policy, financial regulation compliance, and usability, as well as operational aspects such as personnel and economic impacts, deployment models, and maintenance requirements.

Publications:

  • Negi, Parimarjan & Sharma, Prafull & Sanjay Jain, Vivek & Bahmani, Bahman. (2018). K-means++ vs. Behavioral Biometrics: One Loop to Rule Them All. 10.14722/ndss.2018.23306.

Researchers

fsi_bio

Russell Poldrack

close
fsi_bio

Russell Poldrack

Albert Ray Lang Professor, Department of Psychology
Russell Alan (Russ) Poldrack (born 1967) is an American psychologist and neuroscientist. He is a professor of Psychology at Stanford University, member of the Stanford Neuroscience Institute and director of the Stanford Center for Reproducible Neuroscience. Poldrack received his bachelor's degree in Psychology from Baylor University in 1989, and his PhD in experimental psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1995, working with Neal J. Cohen. From 1995 to 1999, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, working with John Gabrieli. Prior to his appointment at Stanford in 2014, he held faculty positions at Harvard Medical School, UCLA, and the University of Texas at Austin.
fsi_bio

David Mazières

close
fsi_bio

David Mazières

David Mazières is a professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he leads the Secure Computer Systems research group. He also serves as Chief Scientist at Stellar Development Foundation, and is a founder of Intrinsic, Inc. Prof. Mazières received a BS in Computer Science from Harvard in 1994 and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2000. Prof. Mazières's research interests include Operating Systems and Distributed Systems, with a particular focus on security. Some of the projects he and his students have worked on include SFS (a self-certifying network file system), SUNDR (a file system that introduced the notion of fork linearizability), Kademlia (a widely used peer-to-peer routing algorithm), Coral (a peer-to-peer content distribution network), HiStar (a secure operating system based on decentralized information flow control), tcpcrypt (a TCP option providing forward-secure encryption), Hails (a web framework that can preserve privacy while incorporating untrusted third-party apps), Dune (a driver granting linux processes safe access to privileged CPU features), and COWL (an information-flow-control-based browser security architecture). Prof. Mazières has several awards including an Oakland distinguished paper award (2014), Sloan award (2002), USENIX best paper award (2001), NSF CAREER award (2001), MIT Sprowls best thesis in computer science award (2000).
fsi_bio

Bahman Bahmani

Research Associate Computer Science
close
fsi_bio

Bahman Bahmani

Research Associate Computer Science
Bahman did his PhD at Stanford University, supported by William R. Hewlett Stanford Graduate Fellowship, and focused on the topic of algorithms for big data applications, in which he is a well-published author in some of the best conferences and journals, including PVLDB, SIGMOD, WWW, and KDD. He was the last PhD student of the legendary late Rajeev Motwani, and has been also advised and co-advised by Ashish Goel and Prabhakar Raghavan (formerly Yahoo VP of Strategy, currently Google VP of Engineering). His industry experience during his PhD studies spans several internships and collaborations with some of the best researchers and practitioners from Twitter, Microsoft Research, Yahoo Research, AOL, and Google. He is a recipient of the Yahoo Key Scientific Challenges Award for his contributions to the area of search technologies.