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Assessing the Impact of Digital Technologies on the Labor Market

Yong Lee, Chuck Eesley, Stephen Zoepf 2017 - 2018

Assessing the Impact of Digital Technologies on the Labor Market

There is increasing concern that the wave of new technologies, such as robotics, digital platform economy, big data analytics, artificial intelligence, and so forth, will disrupt jobs and workers in the near future. While technology can increase productivity of workers and create jobs, it could also directly replace workers. This project examines the net impact of technology on jobs and labor markets. In particular, we examine how digital platform economy in transportation, big data analytics in finance, and robotics in manufacturing will impact workers in each sector. Based on our findings we propose policies that can help alleviate the impact of technology on labor and help prepare future labor for the digital economy. Finally, through this project we will create a platform where scholars and students at Stanford interested in the impact of digital technology on labor markets can exchange ideas, collaborate, and continue to pursue this research objective.

Researchers

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Yong Suk Lee

Deputy Director, Korea Program, Asia - Pacific Research Cente and The SK Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
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Yong Suk Lee

Deputy Director, Korea Program, Asia - Pacific Research Cente and The SK Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Faculty Affiliate, Stanford Center for International Development
Yong Suk Lee is the SK Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) and deputy director of the Korea Program at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC) at Stanford University. Lee's research intersects the fields of labor, international, and urban economics with focuses on entrepreneurship and firm growth, globalization and inequality, and economic sanctions. For example, his research examines the effect of university entrepreneurship initiatives on innovation, and the impact of entrepreneurship on urban economic growth. His research relating to globalization examines how inequality in South Korea evolved after the Asian Financial Crisis, how China’s competition affects firm dynamics in Korea, and how economic sanctions effect the regional distribution of economic activity in North Korea. Prior to joining Stanford, Lee was an assistant professor of economics at Williams College in Massachusetts. He received his bachelor's degree and master's degree in architecture from Seoul National University, a master of public policy from Duke University, and a doctorate in economics from Brown University. Lee also worked as a real estate development consultant and architecture designer as he transitioned from architecture to economics.
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Charles (Chuck) Eesley

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Charles (Chuck) Eesley

Assistant Professor and Morgenthaler Faculty Fellow in the Department of Management Science and Engineering
Chuck Eesley is an Assistant Professor and Morgenthaler Faculty Fellow in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. As part of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, his research focuses on the role of the institutional and university environment in high-growth, technology entrepreneurship. Prof. Eesley was selected in 2015 as an Inaugural Schulze Distinguished Professor. His National Science Foundation of China and Kauffman award supported research focuses on rethinking how the educational and policy environment shapes the economic and entrepreneurial impact of university alumni. Over the past three years, Prof. Eesley has been playing a growing role in national and international meetings on fostering high-tech entrepreneurship, including advising the U.S. State Department in the Global Innovation through Science and Technology (GIST) program, Chile (CORFO), Taiwan (ITRI), and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. He is a member of the Editorial Board for the Strategic Management Journal. Before coming to Stanford, Prof. Eesley completed his Ph.D. at the M.I.T. Sloan School of Management in 2009 where he won BPS Division and Kauffman Dissertation Awards for his work on high-tech entrepreneurship in China.
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Stephen Zoepf

Executive Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford
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Stephen Zoepf

Executive Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford
Dr. Stephen Zoepf is the Executive Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford. He holds a Ph.D., M.Sc. and B.Sc. from MIT. His interests are in future mobility, shared vehicle systems, transportation energy usage and policy. He has eight years of experience in the automotive industry as an engineer and product manager at BMW and Ford, and previously led U.S. Department of Transportation efforts to integrate confidential data submissions efforts into national vehicle energy policy modeling efforts. He was an ENI Energy Initiative Fellow and a Martin Energy Fellow at MIT and a recipient of the Barry McNutt award from the Energy and Alternative Fuels Committees of the Transportation Research Board. He also won the Singapore Global Challenge, Global Young Scientists Summit@one-north in 2013 and was a recipient of MIT's Infinite Mile Award for Outstanding Service to the Institute.