Crypto Policy Project

Jennifer Granick, Dan Boneh 2015 - 2017

Crypto Policy Project

Encryption helps human rights workers, activists, journalists, financial institutions, innovative businesses, and governments protect the confidentiality, integrity, and economic value of their activities. However, strong encryption may mean that governments cannot make sense of data they would otherwise be able to lawfully access in a criminal or intelligence investigation. In the 1970s, and again in the 1990s, U.S. government struggled with tradeoffs between its surveillance/law enforcement missions (potentially thwarted by crypto) and its information assurance/crime prevention missions (furthered by crypto). In the main, these debates were resolved in favor of allowing the proliferation of strong crypto. Today, the crypto policy issue has resurfaced. FBI Director James Comey chides Apple and Google for using cryptography architectures that the companies are unable to decrypt for law enforcement. In secret, the intelligence community is invested in breaking popular encryption schemes, stealing encryption keys, and finding ways to circumvent communications security protocols. The Crypto Policy Project investigates and analyzes the policy and practices of the U.S. and foreign governments for forcing decryption and/or influencing crypto-related design of online platforms and services, devices, and products, both via technical means and through the courts. The project’s interdisciplinary approach includes technical analysis of policy proposals for encryption design, contributed by cryptography researchers in the Stanford Computer Science Department’s Applied Cryptography Group. The project also researches the benefits and detriments of strong encryption on free expression, political engagement, economic development, and other public interests. More information about the Crypto Policy Project can be found at https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/our-work/projects/crypto-policy-project.

Publications:

Pfefferkorn, R. The Risks of "Responsible Encryption", Whitepaper, February 2018
Pfefferkorn, R. Everything Radiates: Does the Fourth Amendment Regulate Side-Channel Cryptanalysis?, 49 Conn. L. Rev. 1393 (2017) https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3096711
Granick, J., Pfefferkorn, R. Brief of amici curiae iPhone security and applied cryptography experts in support of apple, Inc.'s motion to vacate order compelling Apple, Inc. to assist agents in search, and opposition to government's motion to compel assistance. March 2016. http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/publications/brief-amici-curiae-iphone-security-and- applied-cryptography-experts-support-apple-incs 

Researchers

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Jennifer Granick

Director of Civil Liberties, Center for Internet and Society and Affiliate, Center for International Security and Cooperation
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Jennifer Granick

Director of Civil Liberties, Center for Internet and Society and Affiliate, Center for International Security and Cooperation
Jennifer Granick started as the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society's (CIS) Director of Civil Liberties in June of 2012. She became an affiliate at the Center for International Security and Cooperation in July 2012. Jennifer returned to Stanford after stints as General Counsel of entertainment company Worldstar Hip Hop and as counsel with the internet boutique firm of Zwillgen PLLC. Before that, she was the Civil Liberties Director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Jennifer practices, speaks and writes about computer crime and security, electronic surveillance, consumer privacy, data protection, copyright, trademark and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. From 2001 to 2007, Jennifer was Executive Director of CIS and taught Cyberlaw, Computer Crime Law, Internet intermediary liability, and Internet law and policy. Before teaching at Stanford, Jennifer spent almost a decade practicing criminal defense law in California. She was selected by Information Security magazine in 2003 as one of 20 "Women of Vision" in the computer security field. She earned her law degree from University of California, Hastings College of the Law and her undergraduate degree from the New College of the University of South Florida.
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Dan Boneh

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Dan Boneh

Rajeev Motwani Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering
Professor Boneh heads the applied cryptography group and co-direct the computer security lab. Professor Boneh's research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His work includes cryptosystems with novel properties, web security, security for mobile devices, and cryptanalysis. He is the author of over a hundred publications in the field and is a Packard and Alfred P. Sloan fellow. He is a recipient of the 2014 ACM prize and the 2013 Godel prize. In 2011 Dr. Boneh received the Ishii award for industry education innovation. Professor Boneh received his Ph.D from Princeton University and joined Stanford in 1997.