Publications

fsi books

Publications

Browse FSI scholarship on geopolitics, global health, energy, cybersecurity and more.

Publications

Filter:

Filter results Close
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
  • expanded
Book

Patterns of Impunity

Robert R. King
2021
Human Rights in North Korea and the Role of the U.S. Special Envoy
Show body
White Paper

Reversing the Tide: Towards a New US Strategy to Support Democracy and Counter Authoritarianism

Task Force on US Strategy to Support Democracy and Counter Authoritarianism
2021
Report of the Task Force on US Strategy to Support Democracy and Counter Authoritarianism
Show body
Journal Article

Making the Internet Safe for Democracy

Francis Fukuyama
2021
Journal of Democracy from Volume 32, Number 2, April 2021 | Johns Hopkins University Press
Show body
White Paper

Self-harm Policies and Internet Platforms

Shelby Perkins, Elena Cryst, Shelby Grossman
2021
Show body
Journal Article

Health, Psychosocial, and Economic Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on People With Chronic Conditions in India

Kavita (Singh), Dimple Kondal, Sailesh Mohan, Suganthi Jaganathan, Mohan Deepa, Nikhil Srinivasapura Venkateshmurthy, Prashant Jarhyan, Ranjit Mohan Anjana, K. M. Venkat Narayan, Viswanathan Mohan, Nikhil Tandon, Mohammed K. Ali, Dorairaj Prabhakaran, Karen Eggleston
BMC Public Health , 2021
A Mixed Methods Study
Show body
Book

Blood and Diamonds

Steven Press
2021
Germany’s Imperial Ambitions in Africa
Show body
Journal Article

Publishing and Assessing the Research of Economists: Lessons from Public Health

Sean Sylvia, Scott Rozelle
2021
We highlight a growing concern in the economics profession that young scholars face incentives that are misaligned with conducting research that furthers knowledge and addresses pressing policy problems. The premium given to publication in top journals leads to an emphasis on exhaustive treatment of narrow questions. Detailed, robustly identified studies of novel questions are of undeniable value; however, the opportunity cost of producing such studies is large in terms of research quantity and policy relevance. For economists who aim to achieve what we view as the ultimate goals of academic research (enhancing understanding of the world, solving social problems, and building foundational knowledge to enable future breakthroughs), we offer some insights from publication philosophy in the field of public health. We discuss how public health has developed norms around publishing that are more successful in meeting these ultimate goals. We then offer thoughts on potential lessons for young economists in China and the economics discipline.
Show body
Policy Brief

Tracking China's Economic Path

Hongbin Li, Scott Rozelle
2021
Stanford scholars are setting and expanding research agendas to analyze China’s economic development and its impact on the world. The newly launched Stanford Center on China’s Economy and Institutions — co-directed by SIEPR senior fellows Hongbin Li and Scott Rozelle — is supporting their work. In this SIEPR Policy Brief, Li and Rozelle outline the research underway by the new center's affiliates.
Show body
Book

From Mandate to Blueprint

Thomas Fingar
2021
Lessons from Intelligence Reform
Show body
Commentary

Why federal regulation is not the answer

Frank Wolak
Austin American Statesman , 2021
Show body
Journal Article

Variations in the Home Language Environment and Early Language Development in Rural China

Yue Ma, Laura Jonsson, Tianli Feng, Tyler Weisberg, Teresa Shao, Zixin Yao, Dongming Zhang, Sarah-Eve Dill, Yian Guo, Yue Zhang, Dimitris Friesen, Scott Rozelle
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2021
The home language environment is critical to early language development and subsequent skills. However, few studies have quantitatively measured the home language environment in low-income, developing settings. This study explores variations in the home language environment and child language skills among households in poor rural villages in northwestern China. Audio recordings were collected for 38 children aged 20–28 months and analyzed using Language Environment Analysis (LENA) software; language skills were measured using the MacArthur–Bates Mandarin Communicative Developmental Inventories expressive vocabulary scale. The results revealed large variability in both child language skills and home language environment measures (adult words, conversational turns, and child vocalizations) with 5- to 6-fold differences between the highest and lowest scores. Despite variation, however, the average number of adult words and conversational turns were lower than found among urban Chinese children. Correlation analyses did not identify significant correlations between demographic characteristics and the home language environment. However, the results do indicate significant correlations between the home language environment and child language skills, with conversational turns showing the strongest correlation. The results point to a need for further research on language engagement and ways to increase parent–child interactions to improve early language development among young children in rural China.
Show body
Journal Article

Choices In a Crisis - Individual Preferences Among SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines

Daniel B. Kremer, Douglas J. Opel, Efthimios Parasidis , Michelle Mello
The New England Journal of Medicine , 2021
Now that a third COVID-19 vaccine has been given emergency-use authorization, Michelle Mello and colleagues ask whether individuals should be able to choose which vaccine they receive.
Show body
Journal Article

Skill Levels and Gains in University STEM Education in China, India, Russia, and the United States

Prashant Loyalka, Ou Lydia Liu, Guirong Li, Elena Kardanova, Igor Chirikov, Shangfeng Hu, Ningning Yu, Liping Ma, Fei Guo, Tara Beteille, Namrata Tognatta, Lin Gu, Guangming Ling, Denis Federiakin, Huan Wang, Saurabh Khanna, Ashutosh Bhuradia, Zhaolei Shi, Yanyan Li
Nature Human Behavior , 2021
Universities contribute to economic growth and national competitiveness by equipping students with higher-order thinking and academic skills. Despite large investments in university science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, little is known about how the skills of STEM undergraduates compare across countries and by institutional selectivity. Here, we provide direct evidence on these issues by collecting and analysing longitudinal data on tens of thousands of computer science and electrical engineering students in China, India, Russia and the United States. We find stark differences in skill levels and gains among countries and by institutional selectivity. Compared with the United States, students in China, India and Russia do not gain critical thinking skills over four years. Furthermore, while students in India and Russia gain academic skills during the first two years, students in China do not. These gaps in skill levels and gains provide insights into the global competitiveness of STEM university students across nations and institutional types.
Show body
Journal Article

It All Starts at Home: 'Home Reading Environment and Reading Outcomes in Rural China'

Quifeng Gao, Yang Zhang, Wei Nie, Han Liu, Huan Wang, Yaojiang Shi
Journal of Research in Reading , 2021
Background: The educational resources that parents provide at home are crucial to their children’s development. In this study, we focused on home reading environment, a key contributor to success rates regarding the mastery of reading skills. We aimed to investigate students’ home reading environments and examine its effect on the reading development of primary school students in rural China. Methods: We draw on a dataset composed of 10,740 randomly selected primary school students and their households in rural areas of Jiangxi province in China. Surveys were administered by trained enumerators in May 2015. Results: The results show that students exhibited quite poor reading environments and reading outcomes. Specifically, we found the majority of the rural students lacked reading and learning resources in the context of their families and their parents did not enjoy reading or support their children’s reading. Moreover, our regression analysis documented students with poorer home reading environments are more likely to have worse reading performance. Conclusion: Our study supports the significance of the home reading environment in the reading development of students in the upper elementary grades in rural China. Furthermore, the results suggest that the home reading environments of rural Chinese students must be improved.
Show body
Journal Article

Improving Learning by Improving Vision: Evidence from Two Randomized Controlled Trials of Providing Vision Care in China

Xiaochen Ma, Huan Wang, Yaojiang Shi, Sean Sylvia, Lei Wang, Yiwei Qian, Scott Rozelle
Journal of Development Effectiveness , 2021
This paper examines the external validity of health intervention by comparing the impacts of providing free eyeglasses on the educational performance of nearsighted children in two settings: rural public schools in Western China and urban private migrant schools in Eastern China. The intervention significantly improves educational outcomes by 0.14 standard deviations in math in rural public schools but not in private migrant schools. The difference in measured impacts is due in part to lower quality schooling in migrant schools in Eastern China. Our findings show that only when school is providing a quality education, health interventions might increase student learnings.
Show body
Journal Article

Socio-technical multi-criteria evaluation of long-term spent nuclear fuel management strategies: A framework and method

François Diaz-Maurin, Jerold Yu, Rodney C. Ewing
Science of The Total Environment , 2021
In the absence of a federal geologic repository or consolidated, interim storage in the United States, commercial spent fuel will remain stranded at some 75 sites across the country. Currently, these include 18 “orphaned sites” where spent fuel has been left at decommissioned reactor sites.
Show body
Working Paper

Government Quality and State Capacity: Survey Results from Brazil

Ana Karine Pereira, Raphael Amorim Machado, Pedro Luiz Costa Cavalcante, Alexandra de Avile Gomide, Amanda Gomes Magalhaes, Isabella de Araujo Goellner, Roberto Rocha Coelho Pires, Katherine Bersch, Alan Ricardo da Silva
2021
Show body
Working Paper

A quarter century of ‘The Proper Scope of Government’: Theory and Applications

Oliver Hart
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 64 , 2021

A quarter century ago in a seminal paper, Hart, Shleifer and Vishny (NBER1996, QJE1997) developed a theory of the ‘Proper Scope of Government.’ Oliver Hart, 2016 Nobel Laureate, reflects on that framework and its place in economics, as well as the inspiration for his more recent work on norms, guiding principles, and contracts as reference points.

Show body
Book

The Dragon, the Eagle, and the Private Sector

Karen Eggleston, John D. Donahue, Richard J. Zeckhauser
2021
Public-Private Collaboration in China and the United States
Show body
Working Paper

The Effects of Chronic Disease Management in Primary Health Care: Evidence from Rural China

Hui Ding, Yiwei Chen, Min Yu, Jieming Zhong, Ruying Hu, Xiangyu Chen, Chunmei Wang, Kaixu Xie, Karen Eggleston
Asia Health Policy Program working paper # 62 , 2021

Health systems globally face increasing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases, yet many - especially in low- and middle-income countries - lack strong chronic disease management in primary health care (PHC). We provide evidence on China’s efforts to promote PHC management using unique five-year panel data in a rural county, including health care utilization from medical claims and health outcomes from biomarkers.

Show body

Pages