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Governance

Governance

FSI's research on the origins, character and consequences of government institutions spans continents and academic disciplines. The institute’s senior fellows and their colleagues across Stanford examine the principles of public administration and implementation. Their work focuses on how maternal health care is delivered in rural China, how public action can create wealth and eliminate poverty, and why U.S. immigration reform keeps stalling. Looking more broadly at these issues, FSI’s Governance Project works on measuring the quality of governance and assessing a country’s ability to deliver public services.

FSI’s work includes comparative studies of how institutions help resolve policy and societal issues. Scholars aim to clearly define and make sense of the rule of law, examining how it is invoked and applied around the world. One project explores how authoritarian and democratic regimes can encourage or suppress economic development. Meanwhile, the European Governance project looks at governance issues on a single continent.

FSI researchers also investigate government services – trying to understand and measure how they work, whom they serve and how good they are. They assess energy services aimed at helping the poorest people around the world and explore public opinion on torture policies. The Children in Crisis project addresses how child health interventions interact with political reform. Specific research on governance, organizations and security capitalizes on FSI's longstanding interests and looks at how governance and organizational issues affect a nation’s ability to address security and international cooperation.

Recent Events

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Election Forensics Research: a Case of Russia

March 15, 2018

Abstract:Election forensics adds distinctive value to current efforts to promote the integrity of elections around the world by developing special forensic tools and techniques designed to detect...

Using Mass Media to Change Law Enforcement Norms on Human Trafficking in Nepal

March 1, 2018

Abstract:What are the e ffects of mass media campaigns on the norms and behaviors of police officers as pertains to human tra fficking?

Business associations and local taxation in the Philippines

February 22, 2018

Abstract:At their best, decentralizing reforms make government more accountable to citizens and empower local governments to invest in their own development.

Authoritarian Populism and Youth in Turkey

February 14, 2018

Abstract:While populism takes different forms in different countries, the success of populist parties and leaders comes from their ability to represent grievances.

"How's (our) Democracy? Compared to What?"

February 8, 2018

Abstract:Fukuyama (1989) was right: a centuries-old argument about government should be over. Liberal democracy is the best regime known to us.

Will Liberal Democracy Survive the 21st Century?

January 31, 2018

Sponsored by: Stanford University Libraries, Hoover Institution,Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law Even before the 2016 election campaign, political polarization and filter...

Sectarian Inclusion in Post-Conflict Policing

January 25, 2018

Abstract:Societies with deep-seated ethnic or religious divisions pose a challenge for governance: how can a single set of political institutions govern a fragmented population peacefully and...

Information, Political Accountability, and Cumulative Learning

January 18, 2018

Abstract:Throughout the world, voters lack access to information about politicians, government performance, and public services. Efforts to remedy these informational deficits are numerous.

Circles of Compensation: Economic Growth and the Globalization of Japan

January 11, 2018

Japan grew explosively and consistently for more than a century, from the Meiji Restoration until the collapse of the economic bubble in the early 1990s.

Seminar with Lars-Erik Cederman

January 11, 2018

Born in Sweden in 1963, Lars-Erik Cederman received an M.Sc. in Engineering Physics from the University of Uppsala in 1988 and an M.A.

Sectarian Inclusion in Post-Conflict Policing

January 11, 2018

Abstract:Societies with deep-seated ethnic or religious divisions pose a challenge for governance: how can a single set of political institutions govern a fragmented population peacefully and...

Seminar with James Alt

January 11, 2018

James E. Alt is the Frank G. Thomson Professor of Government.

Migration Policymaking in Japan: Does Citizenship Law Matter?

January 11, 2018

Japan is commonly regarded as a country that is closed against migrants. It does not allow their entries in a large size, granting restricted rights.

Land Rents and Vote Buying in China’s Village Elections

January 9, 2018

Susan Whiting is Associate Professor of Political Science and Adjunct Associate Professor of Law and International Studies at the University of Washington in Seattle.  She specializes in Chinese...

We Crossed A Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria

January 9, 2018

This event is co-sponsored with The Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies. ABSTRACTHow can we make sense of the tragedy in Syria?

“Thugs-for-Hire”: Subcontracting of State Coercion and State Capacity in China

December 21, 2017

This paper introduces the concept of "Thugs-For-Hire" (TFH) as a form of third-party state coercion.

Beneath the China Boom: Citizenship, Welfare, and the Making of a Rural Land Market

December 21, 2017

China has pivoted away from export-oriented development towards a strategy of domestic urban and infrastructural construction.  This pivot is especially visible in rural China, where migrant...

Cyber-Enabled Information Warfare and the End of the Enlightenment

December 18, 2017

Abstract: The West has no peer competitors in conventional military power.  But its adversaries are increasingly turning to asymmetric methods for engaging in conflict.  Cyber-enabled information...

Countering nuclear terrorism: Can the United Nations deliver?

December 18, 2017

Abstract: It has been more than a decade since the UN Security Council enacted Resolution 1540—the most far-reaching of international instruments to counter Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)...

Odd one out? The UK government’s voting behaviour in the EU Council

December 15, 2017

EU legislative politics have changed dramatically during the past decade, and the British government has been a vocal and influential voice in shaping EU policies and processes.

The Promise and Limitations of Non-Violent Civil Disobedience: Lessons from India's Struggle for Independence

December 15, 2017

Professor Jha will present an overview of a book project, joint with Rikhil Bhavnani, that examines the promise and limitations of non-violent civil disobedience as a means for peaceful political...

The Long Hangover: Putin's New Russia and the Ghosts of the Past

December 14, 2017

Shaun Walker provides new insight into contemporary Russia and its search for a new identity, telling the story through the country's troubled relationship with its Soviet past.

People

James D. Fearon Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
David Holloway, CISAC David Holloway Senior Fellow Professor, History, Professor, Political Science
Gi-Wook Shin Senior Fellow Professor, Sociology
Kathryn Stoner Deputy Director, Senior Fellow Senior Fellow
Avner Greif Senior Fellow Professor, Economics
Phillip Lipscy Center Fellow Assistant Professor, Political Science
Joseph Felter Senior Research Scholar
Karl Eikenberry Karl Eikenberry Professor of the Practice Fellow, S-APARC, Core faculty, CISAC, Affiliate, CDDRL, Affiliate, TEC
Kharis Templeman Academic Research & Program Manager, Democracy in Taiwan
Harold Trinkunas Harold Trinkunas Deputy Director, Senior Research Scholar
Saumitra Jha Senior Fellow, FSI, Associate Professor of Political Economy, GSB
Stephen J. Stedman Senior Fellow, Professor, by courtesy, Political Science