Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies Stanford University


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John Everard  
2010-2011 Pantech Fellow (former)

Shorenstein APARC
Stanford University
Encina Hall, Room E316
Stanford, CA 94305-6055


Research Interests
North Korean life and society


John Everard, a retired British diplomat, is now a consultant for the UN.

In October 2006, only a few short months after Everard arrived in Pyongyang to serve as the British ambassador, North Korea conducted its first-ever nuclear test. Everard spent the next two-and-a-half years meeting with North Korean government officials and attending the official events so beloved by the North Korean regime. During this complicated period he provided crucial reports back to the British government on political developments.

He also traveled extensively throughout North Korea, witnessing scenes of daily life experienced by few foreigners: people shopping for food in Pyongyang’s informal street markets, urban residents taking time off to relax at the beach, and many other very human moments. Everard captured such snapshots of everyday life through dozens of photographs and detailed notes.

His distinguished career with the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office spanned nearly 30 years and four continents (Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America), and included a number of politically sensitive posts. As the youngest-ever British ambassador when he was appointed to Belarus (1993 to 1995), he built an embassy from the ground up just a few short years after the fall of the Soviet Union. He also skillfully managed diplomatic relations as the UK ambassador to Uruguay (2001 to 2005) during a period of economic crisis and the country’s election of its first left-wing government.

From 2010 to 2011 Everard spent one year at Stanford University’s Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, conducting research, writing, and participating in major international conferences on North Korea.

He holds BA and MA degrees in Chinese from Emmanuel College at Cambridge University, and a diploma in economics from Beijing University. Everard also earned an MBA from Manchester Business School, and is proficient in Chinese, Spanish, German, Russian, and French.

An avid cyclist and volunteer, Everard enjoys biking whenever he has the opportunity. He has been known to cycle from his London home to provincial cities to attend meetings of the Youth Hostels Association of England and Wales, of which he was a trustee from 2009 to 2010.

Everard currently resides with his wife in New York City.


Pantech Fellowships, generously funded by Pantech Group of Korea, are intended to cultivate a diverse international community of scholars and professionals committed to and capable of grappling with challenges posed by developments in Korea. We invite individuals from the United States, Korea, and other countries to apply.


News around the web

As North Koreans struggle, the Party keeps its grip
"The gap between the elite and the rest of the country has probably never been wider," said John Everard, a former British ambassador to North Korea who is now a fellow at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford. But at the same time, ...
February 25, 2011 in Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Hardships Fail to Loosen Regime's Grip in North Korea
"And grindingly poor," in the words of John Everard, the former British ambassador to North Korea. As the envoy from 2006 to 2008, Mr. Everard saw firsthand that the North was on a "precipitous descent into levels of poverty we more normally associate ...
February 24, 2011 in New York Times

NK ruling class offspring wants to live a life of South Korean dramas
“South Korean culture has deeply infiltrated North Korea like a magic,” said John Everard, a former British Ambassador to North Korea.
October 9, 2010 in Korea Times

Inside North Korea: Talk by John Everard
... John Everard, former British Ambassador to North Korea, 2006-2008, brings extensive knowledge of North Korea, China and South America to Stanford.
October 6, 2010 in Stanford Report